ic-410

Star formation in the Tadpole nebula

Dusty emission in the Tadpole nebula, IC 410, lies about 12,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Auriga. The cloud of glowing gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted bystellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright cluster stars are seen all around the star-forming nebula. Notable near the image center are two relatively dense streamers of material trailing away from the nebula’s central regions. Potentially sites of ongoing star formation in IC 410, these cosmic tadpole shapes are about 10 light-years long. The featured image was taken in infrared light by NASA’s Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite.

Image credit: WISE, IRSA, NASA; Processing & Copyright : Francesco Antonucci

IC 410

Most stars form close together in nebulae – large cosmic clouds of gas and dust that act as stellar nurseries. The nebula IC 410 is located 13,000 light-years from Earth and spans 15 light-years. This visible-light photograph was taken with the Megacam instrument on the MMT telescope atop Mount Hopkins, Arizona.


Credit: Harvard-Smithsonian CfA

IC 410 AND ITS TADPOLES

This image is a composite of images taken through broad and narrow band filters, and is a close up of the emission nebula IC 410 in false colours. The narrow band data traces atoms in the nebula, showing different gases in different colours: emission from sulphur atoms is in red, hydrogen is in green and oxygen in blue. IC 410 is over 100 light years across and lies 12,000 light years distant, toward the constellation Auriga.

The tadpoles of IC 410 can be seen above and left of centre; they are composed of denser and cooler gas and dust and are 10 light years long. The tadpoles are potentially sites of ongoing star formation; their tails trail away from the cluster’s central region.

The nebula surrounds NGC 1893, which is a young galactic cluster of stars energising the glowing gas about 4 million years old.

-TEL

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Image Credit & Copyright: Mark Hanson

The Tadpoles of IC 410 

Image Credit & Copyright: Mark Hanson

This telescopic close-up shows off the otherwise faint emission nebula IC 410 in striking false-colors. It also features two remarkable inhabitants of the cosmic pond of gas and dust above and left of center, the tadpoles of IC 410. The picture is a composite of images taken through both broad and narrow band filters. The narrow band data traces atoms in the nebula, with emission from sulfur atoms in red, hydrogen atoms in green, and oxygen in blue. Partly obscured by foreground dust, the nebula itself surrounds NGC 1893, a young galactic cluster of stars that energizes the glowing gas. Composed of denser cooler gas and dust the tadpoles are around 10 light-years long, potentially sites of ongoing star formation. Sculpted by wind and radiation from the cluster stars, their tails trail away from the cluster’s central region. IC 410 lies some 12,000 light-years away, toward the constellation Auriga.

The Spider and The Fly

Space is an exciting place in around the constellation of Auriga. Here you can see the open star cluster M38, the emission nebula IC 410 with Tadpoles. You can see the Flaming Star Nebula (IC 405), and an interesting pair in the lower left: IC 417 and NGC 1931, which with an imaginative mind resemble a cosmic spider and fly.

Image courtesy of Troy Tsounis

NEB-OOOOH-LA   This photo, a composite of images taken through both broad and narrow band filters, shows off the otherwise faint emission nebula IC 410 in striking false-colors. It also features two remarkable inhabitants of the cosmic pond of gas and dust above and left of center, the tadpoles of IC 410. The narrow band data traces atoms in the nebula, with emission from sulfur atoms in red, hydrogen atoms in green, and oxygen in blue. Partly obscured by foreground dust, the nebula itself surrounds NGC 1893, a young galactic cluster of stars that energizes the glowing gas. Composed of denser cooler gas and dust the tadpoles are around 10 light-years long, potentially sites of ongoing star formation. Sculpted by wind and radiation from the cluster stars, their tails trail away from the cluster’s central region. IC 410 lies some 12,000 light-years away, toward the constellation Auriga. (Photo: Mark Hanson via NASA APOD)

The Tadpoles of IC 410 
Image Credit & CopyrightMartin Pugh

Explanation: This telescopic close-up shows off the otherwise faint emission nebula IC 410 in striking false-colors. It also features two remarkable inhabitants of the cosmic pond of gas and dust below and right of center, the tadpoles of IC 410. The picture is a composite of images taken through narrow band filters. The narrow band image data traces atoms in the nebula, with emission from sulfur atoms in red, hydrogen atoms in green, and oxygen in blue. Partly obscured by foreground dust, the nebula itself surrounds NGC 1893, a young galactic cluster of stars that energizes the glowing gas. Composed of denser cooler gas and dust the tadpoles are around 10 light-years long, potentially sites of ongoing star formation. Sculpted by wind and radiation from the cluster stars, their tails trail away from the cluster’s central region. IC 410 lies some 12,000 light-years away, toward the constellation Auriga.

Aurigae nebulae

Rich in star clusters and nebulae, the ancient constellation of Auriga, the Charioteer, rides high in northern winter night skies. Composed from narrow and broadband filter data and spanning nearly 8 Full Moons (4 degrees) on the sky, this deep telescopic view recorded in January shows off some of Auriga’s celestial bounty. The field includes emission region IC 405 (top left) about 1,500 light-years distant. Also known as the Flaming Star Nebula, its red, convoluted clouds of glowing hydrogen gas are energized by hot O-type star AE Aurigae. IC 410 (top right) is significantly more distant, some 12,000 light-years away. The star forming region is famous for its embedded young star cluster, NGC 1893, and tadpole-shaped clouds of dust and gas. IC 417 and NGC 1931 at the lower right, the Spider and the Fly, are also young star clusters embedded in natal clouds that lie far beyond IC 405. Star cluster NGC 1907 is near the bottom edge of the frame, just right of center. The crowded field of view looks along the plane of our Milky Way galaxy, near the direction of the galactic anticenter.

Image credit: Steve Cannistra

Astronomy Photo of the Day: 11/18/18 — The Tadpole Nebula

Dust reigns supreme in this stunning portrait of the Tadpole Nebula (otherwise known as IC 410); a star forming region that lurks about 12,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Auriga.

In this newly-processed image (taken at infrared wavelengths by NASA’s Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer [WISE] satellite), the Tadpole nebula is seen as never before. First and foremost is its gargantuan size. Throughout the 100 light-years of spacetime it encompasses, are numerous notable stars and miniature objects, like a bright, but quaint, open cluster known as NGC 1893. These stars are just 4 million years old, which means they are virtually newborns, They are, however, extremely powerful. Their energetic radiation, along with their fast-moving stellar winds, shape the Tadpole and give it character.
Also worth noting are the streams of material that sweep beneath and to the left of the brightest region, kind of like a cradle. Of course, we can’t forget the tadpoles themselves either. It’s believed that both dense arcs of gas and dust are places of ongoing star formation, each spanning a little over 10 light-years across.

Sources & Other Resources: http://bit.ly/1vm51oo

Image Credit: WISE, IRSA, NASA; (Processing Francesco Antonucci)

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IC 410 the Tadpole in Hubble Palette

IC 410 an emission nebula about 12,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Auriga. Near the center of the nebulous region is a star cluster ( NGC 1893) and just to the bottom right of this cluster lies two structures that resemble tadpoles. These structures are made of leftover hydrogen and dust from the formation of the star cluster and the “tails” are from the solar wind coming from the stars of NGC 1893.

Image Credit: Steve Coates

Astronomy Photo of the Day: 5/10/14 - The Aurgae Nebulae

These are the Aurgae nebulae. While both seemingly interconnected nebulae are located in the constellation Auriga, each can be found at different distances from Earth; thus they are two separate regions, instead of one. The appearance of unity is given due to the fact that this is a wide-field view of the region; spanning an impressive 4 degrees in our sky (which is roughly equivalent to 8 full moons).

On the top left, you see IC 405 (also known as the Flaming Star Nebula); an emission nebula that is located about 1,500 light-years from Earth. On the top right, we have IC 410. This one is much farther away, with astronomers estimating that this region can be found some 12,000 light-years away from Earth.
Moreover, you can even see a star cluster, called NGC 1893, tucked away within the nebulae’s clouds.

Finally, you have IC 417 and NGC 1931. They are pictured near the bottom right.

References: http://goo.gl/i2rkdA

Image Credit: Steve Cannistra (Starry Wonders Astrophotography)