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24 April 2014 - Bucharest, Romania - Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide, also known as the Armenian Holocaust, the Armenian Massacres and, traditionally by Armenians, as Medz Yeghern was the Ottoman government’s systematic extermination of its minority Armenian subjects from their historic homeland in the territory constituting the present-day Republic of Turkey. It took place during and after World War I and was implemented in two phases: the wholesale killing of the able-bodied male population through massacre and forced labor, and the deportation of women, children, the elderly and infirm on death marches to the Syrian Desert. The total number of people killed as a result has been estimated at between 1 and 1.5 million.

It is acknowledged to have been one of the first modern genocides, as scholars point to the organized manner in which the killings were carried out to eliminate the Armenians, and it is the second most-studied case of genocide after the Holocaust. The word genocide was coined in order to describe these events.

The starting date of the genocide is conventionally held to be 24 April 1915, the day Ottoman authorities rounded up and arrested some 250 Armenian intellectuals and community leaders in Constantinople.

Text source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Genocide

Photos: http://iardphoto.tumblr.com/

The Kilometre Zero monument (Romanian: Kilometrul Zero) located in central Bucharest, Romania, in front of Saint George’s Church, was created by Constantin Baraski in 1938.

The distances from Bucharest to other cities in Romania are measured from this monument. It is divided into eight sections, each representing a Romanian historical province: Muntenia, Dobrogea, Bessarabia, Moldavia, Bucovina, Transylvania, Banat and Oltenia. Among the cities inscribed on it are also Chişinău, Orhei, Tighina, which are currently in the Republic of Moldova, as well as Silistra and Dobrich (Bazargic) in Bulgaria, which were part of Greater Romania from 1913 to 1940.

Text source: Wikipedia

Image: IARD Photography