ian-mcEwan

                BOOK STARTERS VOL.24     ( ATONEMENT )    ( Ian McEwan )   ( NSFW THEMES )

  1. ❛ A person is, among all else, a material thing, easily torn and not easily mended. ❜
  2. ❛ It isn’t only wickedness and scheming that make people unhappy, it is confusion and misunderstanding. ❜
  3. ❛ Falling in love can be achieved in a single word—a glance. ❜
  4. ❛ Though you think the world is at your feet, it can rise up and tread on you. ❜
  5. ❛ I’ve never had a moment’s doubt. I love you. I believe in you completely. You are my dearest one. My reason for life. ❜
  6. ❛ It might hurt, it is horribly inconvenient, no good might come of it, but it is what it is to be in love. ❜
  7. ❛ It was always an impossible task, and that was precisely the point. ❜
  8. ❛ Come back, come back to me. ❜
  9. ❛ In my thoughts I make love to you all day long. ❜
  10. ❛ The truth is I feel rather light headed and foolish in your presence and I don’t think I can blame the heat. ❜
  11. ❛ Beauty occupies a narrow band. Ugliness, on the other hand, has infinite variation. ❜
  12. ❛ Is there any meaning in my life that the inevitable death awaiting me does not destroy? ❜
  13. ❛ However, withered, I still feel myself to be exactly the same person I’ve always been. ❜
  14. ❛ Hate is a feeling as pure as love, but dispassionate and icily rational. ❜
  15. ❛ I’m going mad. Let me not be mad. ❜
  16. ❛ Is everyone really as alive as I am? ❜
  17. ❛ Every now and then, quite unintentionally, someone teaches you something about yourself. ❜
  18. ❛ Something has happened, hasn’t it? ❜
  19. ❛ I like to think that it isn’t weakness or evasion, but a final act of kindness. ❜
  20. ❛ Is it possible that I am, in the modern term, in denial? ❜
  21. ❛ How could anyone presume to know the world through the eyes of an insect? ❜
  22. ❛ Not everything has a cause. Some things are simply so. ❜
  23. ❛ I’ll be quite honest with you. I’m torn between breaking your neck here and throwing you down the stairs. ❜
  24. ❛ How old do you have to be before you know the difference between right and wrong? ❜
  25. ❛ It was never meant to be read. ❜
  26. ❛ If I fell in the river, would you save me? ❜
  27. ❛ That was an incredibly bloody stupid thing to do. ❜
  28. ❛ I want to thank you for saving my life. I’ll be eternally grateful to you. ❜
  29. ❛ I’m very, very sorry for the terrible distress that I have caused. I’m very, very sorry. ❜
  30. ❛ Don’t call me that! – Please don’t call me that. ❜
Finally he spoke the three simple words that no amount of bad art or bad faith can ever quite cheapen. She repeated them, with exactly the same slight emphasis on the second word, as though she were the one to say them first. He had no religious belief, but it was impossible not to think of an invisible presence or witness in the room, and that these words spoken aloud were like signatures on an unseen contract.
—  Ian McEwan, “Atonement”
Pinker: I say it’s in the great academic tradition of knowing more and more about less and less until you know everything about nothing. Which perhaps is a good antidote to my other books, which I suppose could be criticised for knowing less and less about more and more, until you know nothing about everything.
—  Dating, swearing, sex, and language: A conversation with questions between Steven Pinker and Ian McEwan. Areté: The Arts Tri-Quarterly, 24, Winter 2007, pp. 81-100

I read a book, yo! I picked up Atonement while I was vacationing last year at a rental property. One of the best parts of staying in rentals as opposed to hotel rooms is checking out the cool book and music collections (the puzzles are great too!) I always bring a book or two to leave. 

This reminds me, I just noticed on my walk last week that one of my neighbors put up a Little Free Library in the their front yard. I’m going to have to check it out today (I was walking with Scott who stops for no book–just cats and dogs). I LOVE this idea.

And another side note, I watch The Middle on a regular basis, and in this week’s episode book nerd Brick discovers the library is closing one of its wings and is having a sale. So he buys an old microfiche, and it’s the best day of his life. Ahhh, libraries. But I digress.

From Amazon: Ian McEwan’s symphonic novel of love and war, childhood and class, guilt and forgiveness provides all the satisfaction of a brilliant narrative and the provocation we have come to expect from this master of English prose. On a hot summer day in 1935, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment’s flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant and Cecilia’s childhood friend. But Briony’ s incomplete grasp of adult motives–together with her precocious literary gifts–brings about a crime that will change all their lives. As it follows that crime’s repercussions through the chaos and carnage of World War II and into the close of the twentieth century, Atonement engages the reader on every conceivable level, with an ease and authority that mark it as a genuine masterpiece.

Atonement is a lovely novel. The movie is great too. But you probably already know that.