i13

I have the worst friends
  • PARAG:dude
  • PARAG:I want
  • PARAG:cookies
  • PARAG:or something delicious
  • PARAG:but: all i ahve is this indian food
  • PARAG:FUCK
  • MATTIAS:dude
  • MATTIAS:my sisters
  • MATTIAS:made
  • MATTIAS:a
  • MATTIAS:CAKE
  • PARAG:FUCK
  • MATTIAS:sheeit ima get some right now
  • PARAG:YOU
  • PARAG:NO
  • PARAG:NO
  • PARAG:NO
  • MATTIAS:hahahahahahaha
  • PARAG:YOU CANNOT EAT THAT CAKE
  • PARAG:NO
  • PARAG:I REFUSE TO LET YOU EAT THAT CAKE
  • MATTIAS:ill send u a pic too
  • MATTIAS:brb
  • PARAG:NO
  • PARAG:I DONT WANNA SEE IT
  • PARAG:ARGH
Comment on: Factory Girls - Cultural technology and the making of K-pop (6/8)

Source: The New Yoker (by John Seabrook, October 8, 2012)

Part 1 - Part 2 - Part 3 - Part 4 - Part 5

“Obviously, there are nine of them,” Neil Jacobson said of Girls’ Generation. “Getting Americans to accept nine girls isn’t going to be easy.” Western boy and girl groups rarely number more than five—One Direction, a five-member boy band from the U.K., is the latest group to conquer the U.S.—and marketers are at pains to emphasize the individuality of each member. But Girls’ Generation seems larger than the sum of its parts.

To this I’d say: Korean idol groups were the same a few years ago, then i13 and Super Junior debuted - each group having 13 members and being a shocker to public and the market itself. One failed, one succeded: yet the number of members was the same. Seems like a group’s size isn’t determining their failure or success, doesn’t it?

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