i-hate-tests

fromxruin submitted this photo with the comment “Hanging out in cemetery trees like the cliches we are.”

Photos of goths up trees is not clichéd, friends.  It’s a unique tradition that we goths must embrace and celebrate, otherwise I’ll have nothing to post about.  That is unless you’re interested in how much I hate writing test scripts or the myriad of ways my colleagues annoy me or how many movies I fell asleep in and missed the end of on the weekend (3).  All very interesting topics, I think you’ll agree. 

To the goths: we have two for the price of one in this submission.  They’re both well-dressed but seem to be relatively low in their trees.  The goth on the right, let’s call her Judy, is in the shade and holding onto her hat for fear of it falling off the back of her head.  I am so glad Judy is brave enough to adopt the white tights look. It’s difficult to pull off and, as my Mum likes to say, white tights do not flatter many people. Good on you, Judy. Bonus points there.  The goth on the left, let’s call her Sally, has managed to get her face in the sun, which is disappointing in terms of sun safety but worked out well for the photo.  Sally is also sporting a hat but sadly it is only shielding the back of her head and not performing any UV shielding function for her face.  It’s more like lovely black halo instead of a hat, which I appreciate, so bonus points for that.  Also bonus points for the cemetery that I seemed to have missed initially (how embarrassing).  Thanks Judes and Sal. 

4.6 out of 5 - Cliché smisché

I freAKING HATE STANDARDIZED TESTING.

I work at Chickfila. Every Tuesday is “Kid’s Night,” and we do some sort of craft, like make trees out of pipe cleaners, or glue tissue paper to a person outline. Today, it was paint flowers with celery stalks. It was also the first night I was asked to lead it.

I adored watching the kids paint flowers and stems and the different designs they swirled into the background. But most of all, I liked talking to them. Little kids say the darndest things. Maddie, 11, said her favorite color was sea green and she wanted an accent wall in her bedroom because she saw it in a Lowe’s commercial for painter’s tape. Kennedy, 8, said she likes doing cannonballs because she sinks all the way to the bottom of the pool. Christopher didn’t say anything, but he did make all the flower stamps into smiling people.

I asked every single one what their name was, what their favorite color was, and what grade they were going into.

But you know what every single one of them going into third grade said when I asked if they were excited for school? Every single one?

“I used to be.”

I used to be.

They have only had three years of school, but now they aren’t excited.

“Why aren’t you excited now?”

They all stopped painting, brows furrowing, before they looked up and gave me a sheepish smile.

“I’m scared about the STAAR test.”

THIS IS WHAT STANDARDIZED TESTING DOES TO OUR CHILDREN. IT TERRIFIES THEM. IT SUCKS THE LIFE OUT OF SCHOOL. IT DISGUSTS ME.

EIGHT YEAR OLDS ARE SCARED ABOUT A TEST. SCARED. SCARED ENOUGH TO NOT BE AT ALL EXCITED ABOUT GOING INTO THE THIRD GRADE. 

IF YOU DON’T THINK THIS IS A PROBLEM, GET TF OUT MY FACE.