i've already used that tag in this

just a reminder that neil literally put his entire life on the line to defend kevin from riko. neil didn’t have to say a thing to riko on kathy’s show. he coulda flew right under the radar and gone on with his original plan, but he literally couldn’t stand to watch riko walk over kevin and so he opened his mouth and risked everything he’d spent his entire life trying to keep safe like……. kevin and neil really out here riding and dying for each other lol

Official list of ship names

Light and L - Lawlight

Light and Misa - Might / Lisa / Yagamane

L, Light, and Misa - Lawlightmane and/or redleathercake

Matt and Mello - Mellodramattic and/or mattello

Mello and Near - Meronia

Matt and Near - Natebit

Mello, Matt, and Near - Nearlymellodramattic

Mikami and Light - Mikalight

Light and Ryuk - Deathgods and/or Beauty and the Beast

Misa and Takada - Misada

Misa and Rem - Remisa

Mikami and Takada - Kiyeru

Beyond Birthday and Naomi Misora - Birthdaymassacre

B and L - Beyondlaw

L, BB, and Naomi - Beyondlawmassacre

L and Naomi - Lawmassacre

Light and Mello - Chocolatechips

Light and Near - Moon River

(Updated!)

stardew valley // rochelle of fables in her cosy farmhouse.

The PS4 edition of Undertale with the dog shrine has reminded me of a headcanon that I’ve not posted about yet. Basically it’s to do with space and shortcuts.

The new thing that’s prompted this is the dog shrine behind the skeletons’ kitchen. Now physically that just totally does not make sense, right? I mean, there’s not literally a cavern behind Papyrus’s sink (though it could be under the kitchen floor, I suppose).

So my answer for when space doesn’t make sense like this: shortcuts in the doorways. In this case, there would be a portal at the back of the cupboard that leads to the dog shrine cavern elsewhere in Snowdin. So you could walk all the way around the house, dig beneath it, everything… and never find the cavern. Physically it’s located miles away in an unknown location.

Where this gets into more headcanon territory is applying similar logic to the Core, and considering how the portals are made.

Keep reading

I’m a hunter, I’m a killer, but I haven’t any guns
And I may be a sinner, but there’s things that I’ve not done
I know that I’m a monster and that’s what I’ll always be
It’s a shame to think that you would waste your life with me

Revenant!Haught from this fic by @officerhaughtstuff and @skillzyo

zethany  asked:

I am so, so, SO very sorry if this has already been asked before. I did some digging through your tags and I couldn't find answers for my particular question... So I apologize in advance if I just didn't do enough digging. I've had a lot of issues with dialogue sequences that go back and forth between two or more characters. I find myself repeating the same phrases such as, "he snickered" and "she cried." Eventually, I just end up using very convoluted word play. Do you have any suggestions?

What you’re asking about here are dialogue tags. There are two schools of thought: Vary the verbs, or don’t fret the “saids.” This is one case where the best practice probably lies somewhere in between. How far you go with different verbs vs. said is up to you as the writer.

There’s another way to break up dialogue, too. It’s my own personal preference, and that’s the use of descriptive beats, sometimes called dialogue beats, narrative beats, etc… This article here describes the two in more depth, but essentially:

Dialogue tag: “You don’t know what I want,” he shouted.

Descriptive beat: “You don’t know what I want.” He slammed the book on the table, knocking over Gena’s wine. 

Both convey anger. Both can be “the right way,” depending on your characters, your style or the needs of the scene.

I tend to write my dialogue either without any tags or just minimal tags when I get started. Often, it literally looks like this:

A: “You’re a jerk!”

B: “Yeah, but I’m your jerk.”

A: “Can’t you stop being a jerk then?”

B: “Are you saying you want to dump me?”

Then, I try to block the scene (much like blocking a stage play) so that I know what the characters are doing, where they’re standing, or other cues that can help with the descriptions. Where no description is needed, I start with said, or asked and replied if appropriate. 

Dialogue beats also help convey something I see a lot of new writers and fanfic writers shying away from, and that’s inner monologue. Your Point of View character can have thoughts during a conversation that can add insight or seamlessly add exposition to avoid infodumping. You’ll find more than a few experienced writers whose dialogue scenes have a lot more inner monologue than external dialogue. You probably just don’t realize it. [Hint: That’s a good thing.]

Favoring descriptive beats over tags means you need to make sure your readers can follow. It’s the one thing I work on the most during editing, too. Again, don’t let fretting over saids and tags and beats ruin your creative flow on your first draft. 

Here’s another good summary of the process. 

Also, make sure you punctuate your tags correctly. Not doing so can be one of those distracting mistakes that can turn readers off and I guarantee will bug the crap out of an editor. 

Now, go. Experiment. Have fun. Enjoy your characters and let them enjoy their dialogue!

– mod Aliya

Pay What You Want commissions

i’m thinking of doing a few Pay What You Want commissions as exercises, and also because i’m a little short on cash!

they could look any type of way, i might use them for style experiments or color warmups or something, it could be a fully decked out piece, or they could be sketches. it’ll depend on the character/person, and how much you decide to throw my way! 

these’ll only be open temporarily, but if you’re interested, you can shoot me a line at serglecommissions@gmail.com with some refs, and if i’m interested i’ll give you my paypal! don’t be shy! this would help me out w/ money, and stretching my art muscles. 

there’s an art tag on my blog, but if y’all are too lazy, here are some crops from some of my past pieces for examples:

taken from the comic book series written by neil gaiman

  • “the price of wisdom is above rubies.”
  • “when do the nightmares slip out into the daylight?”
  • “it was a dark and stormy nightmare.”
  • “I left a monarch. yet I return alone…hungry.”
  • “never trust a [insert word here]. he has a hundred motives for anything he does - 99 of them, at least, malevolent.”
  • “I would have dreamed of you…if I could dream.”
  • “the real problem with stories: if you keep them going long enough, they always end in death.”
  • “little ghost, get out of my way.”
  • “I’ve learned from my mistakes, but I’ve had more time to commit more mistakes.”
  • “I suppose there are worse endings.”
  • “it is a fool’s prerogative to utter truths no one else will speak.”
  • “I only have two kinds of dreams: the bad and the terrible.”
  • “the price of getting what you want is getting what you once wanted.”
  • “it’s part of growing up, I suppose. you always have to leave something behind you.”
  • “nobody looks up in the sky anymore.”
  • “everybody has a secret world inside of them.”
  • “it is sometimes a mistake to climb, it is always a mistake never even to make the attempt.”
  • “sometimes you wake up. sometimes the fall kills you. and sometimes, when you fall, you fly.”
  • “without dreams, there could be no despair.”
  • “it is unwise to summon what you cannot dismiss.”
  • “never trust the storyteller. only trust the story.”
  • “destiny is blind.”
  • “remember how hard it was for me to leave, and that it was not your fault.”
  • “life, like time, is a journey through darkness.”
  • “I like the stars. It’s the illusion of permanence, I think. I can pretend that lives last longer than moments.”
  • “when something ends, there’s always something left over. a story, or a vision, or a hope.”
  • “I don’t recommend revenge. it tends to have repercussions.”
  • “honesty is a somewhat overrated virtue.”
  • “I suppose the point you grow up is the point you let the dreams go.”
  • “the things we do make echoes.”
  • “all journeys leave marks on us.”
  • “have you ever been in love? horrible, isn’t it? it makes you so vulnerable.”
  • “when there’s no hope, you might as well be dead.”
  • “they will haunt your sleep until you die.”
  • “everything changes, and nothing is truly lost.”

About the ship wars on this fandom (ღ˘⌣˘ღ) ♫・*:.。. .。.:*・

Seriously guys, why don’t you just use your energy and love to create content to your OWN ship(s) and characters you like instead of using it to HATE and talk shit about the others??!!! Please??!! Thank you!!!??

4

I tried to draw one (1) pearl!Chuck to nail the outfit down in color, and then I got REALLY distracted.  

Very Related: It turns out the weirdest part about fic from the POV of a currently/recently Homeworld gem is that s/he’s going to assume other gems are she/her and think of them by the names of their gems, and it’s super weird to write.

Keep reading

stormears  asked:

Do you know of any resources for "what it's like to live in X environment?" I'm trying to write about a character living in a village in a desert. I've checked your "research" and "resources" tags and didn't find anything that I could use. My google research gives me things like "facts about deserts/tundras/rainforests" but these are more trivia facts instead of how a person has to adjust their life to use/deal with their environment. I want to read about the human experience of living there.

Let’s turn this into a chance to do deeper searches. I don’t know what you’ve already found, but some of the trivia might be helpful later. Don’t discount it when you need to go hunting or gathering for dinner.

Three things before we jump down the rabbit hole: 

1. There are indigenous people who’ve lived in climates we Westerners think of as inhospitable for millennia. Focus on people, not climates. (Research both, though.)

2. I’m not going to filter out any results that might send anyone to articles that are culturally insensitive/appropriative/exceedingly white. I haven’t vetted all of them all the way. That part’s up to you.

3. You might want to outline or list the building blocks of the world you want to create so you can focus on those specific topics. 

First, make sure you are asking questions in natural, or close to natural, language. Just searching “desert” or “desert life” will probably give you way too many generic articles. 

My first search was “what is it like to live in the desert” and actually, the results that looked most promising were some of the related searches all over the page. 

That gave me the idea to search for “human inhabited deserts” and that got a lot more promising. 

I saw one article, Facts About the People in the Arabian Desert, and it looked like it was meant for kids. But I checked the references at the bottom of the page and found the name of a travel journalist named Ryan Murdock. A few dead ends later, I got to his Articles page on his own website and found a few good links to articles about Jordan and Namibia.

I went back to “human inhabited deserts” just looking for areas/specific deserts/specific peoples and found places like Alice Springs, Australia, the Sonoran Desert, the Kalahari Desert/San people, and the nomadic Tuareg people. 

Don’t forget National Geographic. There are articles available online. Hot tip: You’ll need to filter the search to avoid sifting through hundreds of single photographs. Unless you want to do that for landscape ideas. 

This looks like a start: 

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/hejaz-desert/salopek-text

[Beware the paywall … you might need to use a library database. :-( ]

Then I realized I wanted to find other longform journalism articles, so I searched “where to find longform journalism online” and found several promising, free sites where you might want to search for specific articles.

References on seemingly useless articles might be of the best help. You’re going to have to search more than the first page of results a lot, too. 

See what other authors have done with the topic. Other searches I dove into: 

“books about people living in the desert”

https://timesflowstemmed.com/2013/04/28/top-10-books-about-deserts/

“books about desert cultures” might be good, too.

There’s no guarantee that this is the research path you need to follow, but maybe it will get you started and you’ll find the road you need to take. 

Bonus advice: 

If you’re looking for desert living in a fantasy/sci-fi setting, I recommend reading the classic Dune by Frank Herbert. It’s a master class in using setting to frame a story (and in fact an entire epic saga).

If spec fic isn’t your thing, then I offer up Willa Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop – another novel where setting (New Mexico; the book was published in 1927, so keep that in mind.) is as important as the characters. 

– mod Aliya