i'm not sure if i have posted these before

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Sanji wanted some revenge after the gang teased him about his breakup (viola left him at a mc donalds lol) so he put sleeping pills to their dinner.
And soooooo, when everyone fell asleep…this happened

ALRIGHT BRACE YOURSELVES BECAUSE THIS IS A LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONG POST (literally, 40 images)

I’M SO SORRY PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEEEEASE FORGIVE MEEE THIS IS SO LONG OMG I’m sure y’all gonna be like WHAT BITCH PLEASE I AIN’T READING THIS THING but GIVE IT A GO I SWEEAR IT’S WORTH IT 

iilesgemeauxii  asked:

I really liked your awkward Hanzo comics~ Could you make one where McCree compliments his hair (particularly the white little hair-wings part thing) and the next day someone (Genji? Symm?) finds him with a little smile trying extra hard to make them perfect? (not in a snooty/prideful way. more of a "i hope they look good today maybe he'll talk to me again" way) I am not sure if I'm allowed to make requests/suggestions so i hope this does not come off as pushy~ '3' Welp, 25 letters left so this -

im super glad you liked it omg thank yOU!!! i am 1000% down for requests & suggestions hehe there u go!!!

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A new challenger appears!? Concept sketches of Prince Somnus, still figuring out his design though

whensunscollide  asked:

hey can you do bahorel in 61? 💙💙 thank you! i fell in love with your style!!!!

aaaaw thank you ;;;;;;;;;
Sorry for the wait!!! Here he is

Thank you for requesting!!!
Hope you like it

anonymous asked:

Heyo, do you all have any sort of reference for writing a character with PTSD, anxiety, depression, and all that sorta thing?

Hey there! Great question. I’ve compiled some links for you to check out, and yes, most of these are links to links. I hope what I’ve found helps you!

Before you start writing that character, make sure you can handle the responsibility.

What To Consider When Writing Mental Illness
5 Biggest Mistakes When Writing Mental Illness
On Writing Mentally Ill & Insane Characters
How To Use Mental Illness In Your Writing

Time to research!

On Doing Research
List of Mental Disorders (Wikipedia is generally a good place to begin your research to get a grasp on what it is you’re looking for so that you may recognize certain terms!)
Anxiety Masterpost
Resources For Sz-Spectrum/Psychotic People
Masterpost For Victims Of Psychologial Abuse
How to Write a Character with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)

Writing the character.

Mental Illness - The Character is Not Their Disorder
5 Step Guide On Writing A Character With X Disorder Or X Disease
Writing Characters with Depression: What You’re Doing Wrong
Any tips for writing characters with PTSD?

Other helpful links!

This Is a Towel: Mental Disorders

agentsokka  asked:

Not sure if you've made posts about it before (sorry if you have!), but could you elaborate more on the alphas not 'getting' each others' main flaws? I'm really curious since I haven't heard their relationships described like that before.

Sure, let me try to articulate what I mean here. 

Basically, the alphas as a group all love each other SO MUCH, which is awesome, they’re this closeknit squad and they’re all so important to each other and their relationships all make me feel enormous sprawling feelings, but the sheer AMOUNT they all love each other sort of blinds them to some of their own needs. They all want to think the very best of each other, and the occasional thoughts they have about each other that aren’t like 100% positive get immediately suppressed and marinated in guilt juice and they try not to acknowledge it and go back to focusing on the good instead. 

So they’re all kind of bottling things up about each other, right? But it doesn’t come from any malicious place, it comes from a place of wanting to be the best they can be because they care about everyone else’s opinion so much but also knowing they aren’t always their best selves – and knowing their friends aren’t always their best selves – but if THEY know their friends sometimes are shitty, that means everyone else might know that THEY are sometimes shitty, too. 

They’re all trying so hard to downplay the bad and upjump the good, which is MUCH MUCH easier to do with online relationships. 

You throw them into physical proximity and suddenly those annoyances you all tried so hard to pretend didn’t bug you that bad and never talked about because talking about unpleasant things is, well, unpleasant, start to boil over. Put that on top of the stressful circumstances that led to several relationships starting the session OFF more strained than usual, and wow. They had no fucking chance. 

I love the alphas so much – they got shit on by a lot of the fandom because their plotline was so internal and cerebral, but that is the kind of shit I LOVE. The betas were all friends, but they never felt like ONE GROUP to me. The full four way group dynamic never crystallized. We always found them interacting one on one and rarely ABOUT one another, because the betas’ conflicts were more or less external. The betas’ story up to Collide was them vs the environment, the game, doc scratch, sburb, the horrorterrors. The alphas’ story is so much about THEM. Their relationships. Them as a group. Their interpersonal issues and foibles and there’s this element of nitty gritty real HUMAN-ness to their struggles that isn’t super present with most of the betas who feel like more fantastical figures that struggle against equally fantastical antagonists. (The betas KIND OF segue into something like this post-Collide, but it’s not expounded upon as much, they’re split into different groups, and also a lot of it got retconned - Jade and John had some interesting moments on the boat but that stuff was probably the biggest victim of the retcon.)

OKAY. 

Here’s an example of what I mean to wrap it up: 

Jane and Roxy are best friends, they love each other deeply, you can tell from their every interaction that they care tremendously about each other’s opinion of them, but. Roxy has a drinking problem. This (I think) clearly makes Jane uncomfortable sometimes, but Jane suppresses it and pushes it down because she wants to think the best of Roxy, she minimizes the issue. No one ever confronts Roxy about this very serious problem she has in any real or effective way (not just Jane, NO ONE does this) because they all want to think the best of her and oh… haha….. it’s just a little foible… just  a quirk…. it’s cool…. not a big deal …. I’m sure roxy has her life under control no big deal!!

Basically EVERY alpha relationship has something like this going on. Everyone downplays how much the AR bugs them because hey I’m sure Dirk has things under control he probably does this on purpose god Dirk you’re so silly jeez Dirk we’d really like to talk to you instead of your fucking hell robot sometimes but oh well I’m sure Dirk knows what he’s doing ho hum let’s all downplay how much this actually bothers us because we want to think the best of Dirk and can’t imagine him ever creating a situation he genuinely cannot deal with or control because well gosh he’s just so capable!

Everyone downplays how selfish Jake can be because oh well Jake is just silly he’s so nice he doesn’t MEAN to be this way I mean it’s JAKE how could Jake English ever do something as vaguely malicious as take advantage of how he KNOWS Jane never really says what she’s thinking if that thing is hard to say and use that to his advantage to give him a perfectly reasonable out on having to tell her he isn’t interested in a romantic relationship with her and then, KNOWING she actually did have a huge crush on him, constantly inundate her with his issues with his boyfriend for months thereafter. Surely Jake could never be that manipulative he’s so nice!! (NOTE: I love Jake English, specifically BECAUSE of things like this, I honestly would not like him if he were actually the way fanon paints him all the time, some weak cinnamon roll that can do no wrong.) 

etc etc etc

This is why I love the alphas! They are a group of fucked up teenagers who are all struggling so fucking bad but all need their friends to believe everything is ok, and who need to believe their friends are ok, who want so bad for each other to be happy that they sabotage themselves both individually and as a group in misguided attempts to pretend at and manufacture that happiness without actually doing the hard work of fixing the underlying issues preventing them from TRULY achieving it. 

(The one issue, as with most things in Homestuck that I have issues with, is that we are not shown the resolution to these arcs and struggles in canon, boooooooooooooooooooooo)

You are the dancing queen, 

who replaces spleens, 

dominating the DDR machine.

2

And here we go, a quick screencap redraw with the picture of the cuttest yugi suggested by @kudalyn

you can definitely tell just how lazy i got, i guess i wasn’t really in the mood to put much effort into it and neither was my tablet

anonymous asked:

I'm having trouble because I have a number of characters that I need to introduce pretty early on and I'm not sure how to do it without just having them all introduce themselves. None of them have ever met or heard of each other before the beginning of the story. Any advice?

Character Introductions

Greetings and salutations! We’re going to talk about character introductions, but before we do, I’m going to link two posts off the top of my head where we’ve discussed this before. Check out these two posts for some additional information if you’d like it. Regardless, I’m going to go in depth here on some great strategies for mass character introductions. 

Penney on Character Introductions

Rebekah on Two Characters Meeting for the First Time

Evaluate the Necessity of Each Introduction

Our anon mentioned that they needed to introduce all these characters pretty early on, but let’s stop and analyze that need for a moment. When you’re trying to decide if a particular event or detail is needed early on in your story, ask yourself the following question:

Do these characters (or facts/details) I’m introducing play a key role in the action of the beginning scenes? 

Make a list of your first few scenes (include brief summaries of the scenes), and look at who the key players are. Imagine you have a character that is being paid to steal something, and they’re in the process of stealing it. The conflict in the first scene is their success/failure to steal said object. The person who hired them to steal it is unimportant in this first scene. Yes, mention that your character was hired by someone to do this, and maybe hint at a general consequence if your character fails (”He’ll kill me if I fail”) but avoid an in depth description of this “boss character” and the nature of their relationship until later. The only thing that matters right now is whether or not your protagonist is able to steal this object.

Regardless of what happens in the first scene, your protagonist will need to return to this boss character and either give them the object they stole or inform them that they failed. This is the point where you start to describe this boss character - what they look like, what their demeanor is like, what they’re willing to do to make their point. It may be the point where you go into the backstory of your protag’s relationship with them, but it may not be needed even now. It may be that this backstory isn’t necessary to know until 2 or 3 scenes later on when we start to wonder why the hell our protagonist is putting up with this boss person’s insane orders and methods. 

The key point when it comes to exposition - make readers wonder about it before you tell them. Giving a reader all the information in the first chapter often results in a reader learning things they don’t even care to know yet.

So the first thing to do before you start introducing all your characters, is to decide which characters are involved in the actual events of the story in these early scenes. It’s likely that some of the characters need only a brief mention at this point (not a full intro), or perhaps even a postponed intro until a chapter or two later. 

In the case of our anon, none of their characters know each other, so it’s necessary here to ask yourself why they all need to meet at this particular point. Can Character A meet B in scene one, and then meet C, D, and E in scene three? 

If you feel like they all have to meet at once, because they’re all part of a group or something, then choose one or two relationships to focus on first. For example, when I start a new job, I take in everyone’s names at once but likely only remember a few, and the few I remember are because I end up talking or working with them 1-on-1 first. So decide if you’re able to generalize some of the introductions early on and focus on one or two character interactions early. It doesn’t mean those generalized intros are insignificant characters - it simply means we’ll get to them later when they become relevant. If this point seems valid to you, definitely read Penney’s post. 

Make Each Intro Significant and Memorable

I make this point in the post of mine I linked, but in this case, there’s a little more to it than what I discussed. When a character is meeting a lot of other characters, each introduction should include more than just “Hi, I’m Rebekah.” A detail should be included that we’ll remember, or something should happen that becomes significant. 

In Big Hero 6, Hiro meets four new characters in one scene (five if you include Callaghan). And each introduction includes not only a name (a nickname actually), but also showcases the area of science they each specialize in, because they’re each fussing with their projects as he moves through the room. Because he’s meeting them while they’re in the middle of work, we also see some characteristics about how they each operate (Wasabi getting upset when his “system” is disrupted by people grabbing his stuff). And rather than one big mass introduction, (”That’s Go-Go over there, and this here is Fred, and oh that guy over there is Wasabi”), Hiro meets each person individually, though still in one scene. These are formal introductions, but they work because they reveal something memorable and significant about each person, and it’s easier to keep track of them.

If this were a novel rather than a movie, this would also be a good place for Hiro to relate specific details about each person to his own life. If one of them reminded him of someone (whether it’s someone he knows, or a cross between two famous characters/celebrities), or if he’s initially intrigued or put-off by the character. For instance, Hiro later has an overflowing wastebasket full of discarded ideas, and this kind of mess might be something a super organized person like Wasabi might be driven insane by. So when they meet, Hiro might think something like, “Wow, if he’s frazzled by this kind of chaos, he better not set foot into my workshop.” I’ve exaggerated a bit, but I want to show an example of your opportunity as a novel writer versus a script writer. Pick on little details and show how the details affect the character that’s meeting them. 

Use Distinguishable Names and Create Associations

If at all possible, choose names for your characters that are easy to keep straight. Try to avoid having too many character names that start with the same letter, or have similar sounds to them. That’s no need to have a Danny D. and Danny C. situation here, or even an Ashley/Amber situation. You have control over your characters’ names, so pick names that are easily distinguished from the other characters’ names. 

Also, with a large cast, let readers form associations with a particular name that they won’t forget: 

  • “Noah was a ‘no-nonsense’ kind of guy.” 
  • “Shelley had a shrill laugh, and she was easily amused (and easily startled) so you heard it quite frequently, even across the room.”
  • “Ricky was the risk taker of the group. Not because he was brave or anything, but because he never thought things through.”

Let’s review:

  • Noah = no nonsense
  • Shelley = shrill
  • Ricky risky

These adjectives serve as subtle mnemonics that help to build associations between names and descriptors, and it’s the type of thing that a reader will remember without realizing that they’re remembering it. 

Mix and Match for Variety in Interactions

Depending on the type of point of view you are using, you may also have the opportunity to create smaller conversations within the larger group. You start the story with Ashley meeting Noah and Shelley, and you take the time to really show enough of who each character is that we’ll remember, and then you jump to a new scene where Danny is meeting Ricky. Once we’ve gotten used to this second group of characters, you bring all five together. Instead of being overwhelmed with all five characters at once, we’re spoon fed a little at a time so it’s less of an overload. 

And this example of 3 characters, then 2 characters isn’t an absolute. You can work with as many characters as you feel you can balance. If you’ve got a cast of, let’s say 12 characters, you might start the scene with a group of 5, and then a group of 3, and then a group of 4. The number of characters you’ll introduce at a time is in proportion to the cast as a whole. A bigger cast might mean bigger groups, or perhaps several smaller groups. This is where you play around with your specific setup to see what works. 

These are just some tips for introducing a large number of characters. Hopefully something in here will help you!

-Rebekah

Sangwoo’s type of “love”

So I don’t have anything really insightful to add to this kind of discussion but rather a really simple interpretation.

Sangwoo’s affection is like when a cat brings you a dead rodent as a treat. You might see it as gross and unappealing but to the cat it bestowed a gift onto you.

theambiguoushero  asked:

Helpful tips for looking at apartments for the first time? I'm going this weekend and I need tips!

Ooooh, SO! I wrote a post on this awhile back, so this is a copy/paste: 

Before you are ready to move: Make sure to keep an updated document of your current and past addresses, landlord phone numbers and other info you’ll be asked on a lease application, including first and last names of other residents, current employment information and so on. Bonus: lots of these things are also useful on job applications! Also, start saving for deposits. Beyond the one on the apartment, you may have to put down deposits on your utilities.

When you are ready to move: Figure out your price range — a good rule of thumb is no more than one-third of your income. Also, clean out your car — lots of landlords notice the small details, and how you take care of your other expensive habitat.

If you’re in a tight market, don’t send a flurry of questions to the landlord ahead of time; briefly introduce yourself, dropping in a detail or two that makes you sound put-together and responsible. Ask for the first viewing possible.

When looking at an apartment: Be sure to be on-time, looking tidy and presentable, then check the following:

1. Hot Water: Go turn on the shower and make sure there is sufficient water pressure and it’s nice and strong and not, as my mom once memorably said of my shower, like having an 83-year-old man pee on you. Also, does the water get hot? Is it the either scalding or frigid kind of shower? That’s nice to know.

2. Safety: Come back by the area at night, during the day, on the weekend and so on. Make sure you feel reasonably safe at all these times.

3. Volume: Consider whether there is something very loud nearby, like a fire station or train tracks or a high school with a sub-standard but enthusiastic marching band. Will this make you crazy?

4. Management: Does the landlord seem at least semi-reasonable? Landlords are tightly-wound people, generally speaking, so you have to give them a little leniency. But, real talk: chances are, if you are in a conflict with them, they will win. They have money and lawyers. They’re business people. Make sure they’re the kind you want to be in business with.

5. Electricity: Be sure to check all the light switches and, if you can, the electrical outlets, perhaps by taking along your cell phone charger. Otherwise, you could end up like my friend who had 14 decorative outlets and two that actually powered things. It’s also useful to check on how many and how well-placed they are. If you like to blow-dry your hair, look for an outlet in the bathroom. It’s nice to have several in your bedroom so you’re not constantly tripping over your bedside lamp’s cord that must stretch taut through the air. And so on.

6. Closets and Storage: Do they exist? Some old houses had bedrooms without closets. Having at least one big non-bedroom closet is a lifesaver, so long as you do not follow my example and allow it to become a dangerous and unstable mess, like a tiny DMZ right there in your apartment.

7. Appliances: Is there a dishwasher, or a washer-dryer? These things are luxurious, but if there is nothing you hate in the world more than hand-washing dishes, then you might make that a condition of your search.

8. Accessibility: Can your furniture logically get up the stairs and into the apartment? It’s a good plan, if you have really large and/or awkwardly shaped things, to measure them in advance, then take a tape measure along with you.

9. Pets: If you have a pet, can they live here with you? The lure of a nice apartment is not justification for dropping your pet off at the shelter. Also, some apartments that say “no pets” can be coaxed into a quiet, well-behaved, neutered cat, particularly if you can provide a reference from a landlord as to your cat’s goodness.

10. Paint: Can you paint the walls? What if you agree to paint them back to the original, sanitarium white when you leave?

11. Parking: Is it extra? Lot v. garage? Remote for the garage? Assigned spots? Street parking at reasonable times? Where can guests park? (thanks, lexingtoncherry!)

12: Additional costs: Which utilities do you pay? Power, water/sewer, garbage, cable, internet …? Be sure to factor these into your cost calculation. (thanks, anserini!)

After seeing an apartment: If you know it’s the right place for you, express that when you see it and then send an email as soon as possible. Thank them for taking the time to meet with you, say that you are very interested, have the deposit money ready and would like to sign a lease ASAP.

anonymous asked:

Hello I have a question about your "acceptable and unacceptable" post about Tokyo ghoul. I'm new to the fandom. When you say that it's not okay to tweet spoilers at Ishida, what does that mean? He wrote it so I'm a bit lost.

Sure thing, Anon.

Here is the thing you need to remember:

What we are reading are Fan translations, done from pirated/stolen copies of the magazine Young Jump.

The week before the magazine goes onto stands, the copies are shipped to stores. This gives them time to get everything prepared, and is typical of any retail scenario.

So someone(s) get their hands on one of these copies of the magazine, and then sell it to people online. These groups then translate the chapter, edit it to have English text, and post it online.

Young Jump comes out every Thursday in Japan. That is the official release date.

So we are basically getting to read the chapter several days before the Japanese fans that purchase a copy of Young Jump. Ishida is aware that this is happening, and has only commented on it by essentially asking Western fans to RESPECT Japanese fans. If you send tweets to Ishida or Japanese fans about a new chapter, you are SPOILING THOSE THAT PURCHASE IT LEGALLY.

Ishida has explicitly stated more than once that he DOES NOT want this to happen.

So basically, it’s about being respectful. By tweeting Ishida about the chapter, people are doing two things are once that are shitty:

  1. Rubbing in Ishida’s face that they are reading a STOLEN copy of his work.
  2. Spoiling the fans that wait to purchase their copy legally.

Both of these things make Western fans look really bad.

theunknownsomeone  asked:

I saw your post on twitter about the episode being around 25 minutes and it's not finished yet. Maybe you should split it in two parts? I'm sure that you have thought of this and because I don't see it mentioned maybe it's not a good idea.

I know dear! That’s exactly what I’ve been planning to do. I do want to finish both parts before releasing amything, or people will cut my head off lol

  • Alex: Sorry to disappoint, Maggie, but you do not have a "mean look".
  • Magnus: Oh please, I'm sure I have a mean look! I'm sure it makes people quiver in their boots!
  • Alex: If by "people" you mean "adorable baby kittens", then yes. Before they wobble over and lick your face.
  • Magnus: *glares daggers at Alex*
  • Alex: Aw, look at all of the kittens coming over! How adorable!