i wonder what this says about gender equality

anonymous asked:

Do you consider yourself a feminist? Do you think there are misconceptions about what it means to be one? What does it mean to you? Are there any positives and negatives about being one?

Yep. Feminist! :)

And first let me just say, I am a simple cartoon maker. I am not a scholar, and this is a big topic. But here goes anyway. I wonder if some people misinterpret the word “feminism” to mean “DOWN WITH MAN!!1!” But, uh, this is wrong to me. It’s really simple; feminism means standing up for the equal treatment of genders, end of story. Right?

If you want to apply for that job, you should have no unfair social standards or biases keeping you from doing that (man or woman). If you want that promotion, you should be entitled to that (man or woman). If you want to have a kid, that’s your choice, and if you don’t want a kid, you aren’t being ‘selfish’ (man or woman).

So, yeah. Big topic, and I am waaay under-qualified to talk about it in an insightful, educated way. Much more qualified to talk about how cute my cat is. But I know the basics. Feminism=equality.

Shout-out to all the awesome guys out there who have our backs with this.

New York Times – Lynda Carter Deflects Critics of Wonder Woman

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/22/fashion/lynda-carter-wonder-woman-united-nations.html

Is Wonder Woman a “pinup girl” or a feminist icon? The question dogged a United Nations campaign that featured the superhero as a symbol of self-empowerment for girls and women.

While some feminists may have felt triumphant when the United Nations announced the end of the Wonder Woman campaign this month (in an earlier Times article, a United Nations spokesman said that the campaign had merely run its course, and that the end had nothing to do with the uproar), one loyalist was not going to sit by as her cape was dragged through the mud: Lynda Carter, the actress who starred in the 1970s television show “Wonder Woman.”

Of the pushback that accompanied the campaign, Ms. Carter believes that some of it may be because “the U.N. didn’t put a woman in there.” The ambassadorship was announced just weeks after the United Nations passed over several women to be secretary-general.

Now 65, she is preparing to pass her golden lasso to Gal Gadot, the Israeli actress who will appear in next spring’s film version of “Wonder Woman.” Ms. Carter took time from acting (including a role as the president on “Supergirl” and a governor in the coming film “Super Troopers 2”) and career as a singer (she just competed a four-city tour and is recording her third studio album) to discuss the complex legacy of her Amazon princess alter ego. (This interview has been edited and condensed.)

Q. There seems to be some disagreement about what a feminist icon should look like.

A. What I find interesting is that they didn’t look at the larger picture. I agree that the issue of gender equality is much larger than any character is, and I understand that a comic book character should not be representative of something that is that important. I agree with that. What I disagree with is this idea about Wonder Woman. She’s an iconic defender, she’s archetypal. It’s the ultimate sexist thing to say that’s all you can see, when you think about Wonder Woman, all you can think about is a sex object.

What about those skimpy outfits?

Yeah, so? Superman had a skintight outfit that showed every little ripple, didn’t he? Doesn’t he have a great big bulge in his crotch? Hello! So why don’t they complain about that? And who says Wonder Woman is “white”? I’m half-Mexican. Gal Gadot is Israeli. The character is an Amazonian princess, not “American.” They’re trying to put her in a box, and she’s not in a box.

Did you ever think of your character as sexy?

If you think of the ’70s, that was miniskirts and bikinis. I never really thought of Wonder Woman as a super-racy character. She wasn’t out there being predatory. She was saying: “You have a problem with a strong woman? I am who I am, get over it.” I never played her as mousy. I played her being for women, not against men. For fair play and fair pay.

Some critics called Wonder Woman a “male fantasy.” But wasn’t the show more aimed at girls than boys?

I still have women at airports coming up to me saying: “Oh, you don’t know what it meant to me. That show got me through this difficult time, that difficult time.” That’s really where the fantasy became a reality, where Wonder Woman became something much more than a TV show or a comic book. And I’ll tell you this, when women recognize me in airports, I hold them in my arms and they cry. If a guy comes up and says, “Oh my God, I had such a crush on you when I was a teenager,” I say: “Talk to the hand. I don’t want to know.”

nytimes.com
Lynda Carter Deflects Critics of Wonder Woman
By ALEX WILLIAMS. DEC. 22, 2016

Is Wonder Woman a “pinup girl” or a feminist icon? The question dogged a United Nations campaign that featured the superhero as a symbol of self-empowerment for girls and women.

While some feminists may have felt triumphant when the United Nations announced the end of the Wonder Woman campaign this month (in an earlier Times article, a United Nations spokesman said that the campaign had merely run its course, and that the end had nothing to do with the uproar), one loyalist was not going to sit by as her cape was dragged through the mud: Lynda Carter, the actress who starred in the 1970s television show “Wonder Woman.”

Of the pushback that accompanied the campaign, Ms. Carter believes that some of it may be because “the U.N. didn’t put a woman in there.” The ambassadorship was announced just weeks after the United Nations passed over several women to be secretary-general.

Now 65, she is preparing to pass her golden lasso to Gal Gadot, the Israeli actress who will appear in next spring’s film version of “Wonder Woman.” Ms. Carter took time from acting (including a role as the president on “Supergirl” and a governor in the coming film “Super Troopers 2”) and career as a singer (she just competed a four-city tour and is recording her third studio album) to discuss the complex legacy of her Amazon princess alter ego. (This interview has been edited and condensed.)

Q. There seems to be some disagreement about what a feminist icon should look like.

A. What I find interesting is that they didn’t look at the larger picture. I agree that the issue of gender equality is much larger than any character is, and I understand that a comic book character should not be representative of something that is that important. I agree with that. What I disagree with is this idea about Wonder Woman. She’s an iconic defender, she’s archetypal. It’s the ultimate sexist thing to say that’s all you can see, when you think about Wonder Woman, all you can think about is a sex object.

What about those skimpy outfits?

Yeah, so? Superman had a skintight outfit that showed every little ripple, didn’t he? Doesn’t he have a great big bulge in his crotch? Hello! So why don’t they complain about that? And who says Wonder Woman is “white”? I’m half-Mexican. Gal Gadot is Israeli. The character is an Amazonian princess, not “American.” They’re trying to put her in a box, and she’s not in a box.

Did you ever think of your character as sexy?

If you think of the ’70s, that was miniskirts and bikinis. I never really thought of Wonder Woman as a super-racy character. She wasn’t out there being predatory. She was saying: “You have a problem with a strong woman? I am who I am, get over it.” I never played her as mousy. I played her being for women, not against men. For fair play and fair pay.

Some critics called Wonder Woman a “male fantasy.” But wasn’t the show more aimed at girls than boys?

I still have women at airports coming up to me saying: “Oh, you don’t know what it meant to me. That show got me through this difficult time, that difficult time.” That’s really where the fantasy became a reality, where Wonder Woman became something much more than a TV show or a comic book. And I’ll tell you this, when women recognize me in airports, I hold them in my arms and they cry. If a guy comes up and says, “Oh my God, I had such a crush on you when I was a teenager,” I say: “Talk to the hand. I don’t want to know.”

I guess “The Flying Nun” and “Bewitched” were about female characters with superhuman powers, but “Wonder Woman” was really a breakthrough in terms of television superheroines. Why did the show strike such a chord with girls watching at home?

There was this idea that inside every woman is a secret self. It’s much less about the color of your skin, much less about your height or weight or beauty, but it’s the attitude, the strength of character, the fight for rights: the beauty within, the wisdom within.

At the height of your fame in the 1970s, you were voted the most beautiful woman in the world in one poll. Does that sort of thing change the way you see yourself in the mirror?

I’m sure I went and looked. And I’m sure I had no makeup on and I’m sure I went, “Huh, really?”

You have been open about your struggles with alcohol and finding sobriety. Was that all about the post-“Wonder Woman” blues?

Yes and no. I think that that was more about my bad marriage. I went through some tough times, and it brought solace at the time. But of course, that just rears its ugly head and bites you. But now it’s coming up on 20 years since I’ve been sober.

Along with your second husband, you were big figures on the D.C. social circuit. Do you still get out there the way you did?

We’re still pretty active politically. Less so now than we used to be. But no. The era of Beltway parties that include both sides of the aisle, it just doesn’t happen anymore. People used to talk to each other, they worked things out, they tried to get things done. They stopped talking to one another. It’s just gotten so ugly.

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GMWWriters Tweets #12

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SEASON 1

  • First Date:  Thank you for [the] full circle bus scene finale. [Riley] Went from not being able to speak to giving kiss. Beautifully done. How a Cast grows in 21 weeks ;-) “That was the intended takeaway. Thanks for getting it.” (x)
    • I loved the continuity errors reference when it comes to Corpanga’s first date in the last episode! “Yeah. One was purposefully out of continuity.” (x
    • I was kind of confused when Maya asked Lucas out how did it help Riley? “It pushed Lucas. Maya has been pushing Lucas all along.” (x)
    • okay, one question. When Riley+Maya were sat in the window, did Maya hint that she liked Lucas?! Or was I dreaming it?! “y'know, dreams are manifestations of what people think.” (x Did she hint it or not?! I’m confused! “So are we” (x)
    • Why did Lucas call Maya the other one? Was it lucaya foreshadowing? “No, they already have an interesting relationship. Foreshadowing would be if I said: Look at those leaves in the wind…” (x
  • DemolitionCan you give me another Corpanga line from demolition please! You know I love them ”You’ll love that [episode]. Lots of Cory and Topanga. Well there’s 1,200 bucks I’m not getting back.” (x)
    • Are we going to see more Cory and Topanga scenes like just them, no kids? “Not their show, but strong in next episode.” (x
    • Give me a word that someone says in Demolition. Give the word and who says it “Timberlake. Auggie. Last word of episode.” (x
    • Maya line: “Agg-hugghh” (x)

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