i wish my life was as glamourous

anonymous asked:

Don't remember from what interview but Taylor once said May you have moments to beautiful to capture on film something like that I don't think it's right but along that line. Can somebody find it?

Some moments are for Instagram, some are just for the moment itself. We’re encouraged to document everything important that happens to us. Birthdays, proposals, baby’s first this or that, crazy nights out when everyone’s outfit is on point. It’s cool, we all do it. What gets tricky is when something great happens and you didn’t capture it, then you feel this sense of loss. That sense of loss and anxiety that you didn’t get to your phone fast enough then completely overtakes the magic of the moment that just took place. So lately, I’ve learned to really live my life, and not worry so much about documenting every split second of it. The most magical, exquisite, spontaneous things happen when there is no time to grab your phone. The best moments of my life have been too fragile, too fleeting, too magical to even try to document them with a camera. And I wish you a lifetime of moments too beautiful to capture on film. - Taylor, Glamour UK

Some moments are for Instagram, some are just for the moments itself. We’re encouraged to document everything important that happens to us. Birthdays, proposals, baby’s first this or that, crazy nights out when everyone’s outfit is on point. It’s cool, we all do it. What gets tricky is when something great happens and you didn’t capture it, then you feel this sense of loss. That sense of loss and anxiety that you didn’t get to your phone fast enough then completely overtakes the magic of the moment that just took place. So lately, I’ve learned to really live my life, and not worry so much about documenting every split second of it. The most magical, exquisite, spontaneous things happen when there is no time to grab your phone. The best moments of my life have been too fragile, too fleeting, too magical to even try to document them with a camera. And I wish you a lifetime of moments too beautiful to capture on film.
—  Taylor Swift in Glamour UK: the lessons I’ve learned and how they empower me.

Favorite Classic Black Female Stars Josephine Baker (1906-1975)

 “Baker was a woman torn between multiple identities and multiple loves. She lived for her loves and in a certain sense, died as a result of them. It seems to me that as a key to understanding her destiny, nothing is more important than the song ‘I Have Two Loves,’ which became her theme song and was associated with her throughout her life. In my opinion, everything is contained in the song’s assertion, ‘I have two loves, my country and Paris,’ which goes far beyond its apparent simplicity. In these few words, Baker transcends herself and reaches out to the destiny of an entire generation. It is in this far-reaching influence that we can see the startling modernity of this woman, who resembled and even surpassed Colette and George Sand. She wished to be free all her life, and she was always guided by that passion and commitment.”  

 Simon Njami in Bennetta Jules-Rosette’s Josephine Baker in Art and Life: The Icon and the Image

those70scomics  asked:

What career do you think Jackie would be happiest in -- not something she'd do to get external validation (e.g., a career that would make her famous) -- but something she'd be really passionate about doing?

I’ll go for something about fashion. Not necessary a fashion designer or a model (she’s too small to be a model and overall, I don’t think she would actually like that kind of life. At least not the Jackie we generally love), but maybe a personal shopper or buying assitant.

To be a personal shopper for fashion industry is to help people see what looks better on them and how to administrate their money to make the betters buys. I think Jackie would LOOOOVE doing something like that, to manage someone else’s money at the same time she’s giving them makeovers and orders about how and what to wear.

And my personal headcanon is that she realized she didn’t like the TV glamour as much as she wished she would, but she likes to prepare segments for variety programs and becomes a producer. But not just any producer, but one of those that resurrect shows. I think they are called doctors (kind of like a script doctor, like Carrie Fisher was).

I don’t see her actually writing down scripts, but directing everything behind the scenes and preparing the segments for everyone to work in. She likes to boss around and a job like that will give her that chance. It would also give her chance to talk about fashion, make up and other femenime stuff she likes given the right program.

9

Towards the end of Blake Edwards’s 1982 musical farce, Victor/Victoria, there is a short but memorable scene where Victor (Julie Andrews), now the celebrity toast of Paris, is in the midst of a gruelling photo-shoot with a flamboyant studio photographer. As the photographer issues a fusillade of fussy directions – “hold it”, “head up just a touch” – Victor appears tired and withdrawn. “Victor, darling,” chides the photographer with theatricalised exasperation, “do you think you could manage to look a little less…funereal?” “René, darling,” retorts Victor through gritted teeth, “why don’t you go suck an egg?!”

Plot-wise, this short scene serves to signal Victor’s increasing weariness with life as “a woman pretending to be a man pretending to be a woman”; and, indeed, in the very next scene, the character confirms his decision to give up the charade and “announce to the world that I am really Victoria Grant”. However, the scene also works to convey extra-textual information in the form of its not-so-coded allusion to famed photographer Cecil Beaton and his real-world relations with star Julie Andrews.

Bedecked in straw fedora and silk cravat, and striking caricatural fey poses, the character of René is clearly patterned on Beaton. The actor playing the part, Paddy Ward, even bears a pronounced physical resemblance to the celebrated aesthete. Lest there be any doubt these similarities were less than fully intentional, in the special audio commentary recorded by Julie and Blake for the 2002 DVD release of Victor/Victoria (and also included on the recently released Blu-Ray), Julie confirms “that’s the Cecil Beaton character” when René appears on screen.

Beaton and Julie had of course worked together in the late-1950s during the Broadway and London runs of My Fair Lady. Beaton provided the award-winning costume design for the hit musical, and also functioned as de facto show photographer, taking copious production stills and portraits of the cast, as well as independent photoshoots for magazine features, fashion spreads and his own personal portfolio. Featured here is a brief selection of some of the hundreds of photographs that Beaton took of Julie during her My Fair Lady tenure. The shots demonstrate Beaton’s characteristic flair for elegantly styled portraiture and they number among the most visually striking images from the early years of Julie’s career. But the surface polish of the photographs belies what was by all accounts a less than easy collaboration.

In her 2008 autobiography Julie recalls Beaton as “a taskmaster” and admits to feeling “pretty intimidated by him at first” (192). She relates several unhappy encounters with the prickly artiste: almost fainting with fatigue during an arduous costume fitting and finding “Beaton was not sympathetic” (192); being told by him after a long photo session where Julie had “tried to give it my all” that “you are the most hopelessly un-photogenic person I have ever met” (192); or, most notoriously, having Beaton burst into her dressing room in a raging fury on the first night of My Fair Lady’s out-of-town tryouts because she inadvertently wore one of his hats the wrong way round,

“Beaton picked up the hat and slammed it onto my head. ‘Not that way, you silly bitch–this way!’ he snapped. I nearly burst into tears” (200).

It’s interesting to speculate on the source of Beaton’s orneriness with Julie. Though he had a reputation as a waspish old queen – Jean Cocteau famously nicknamed him “Malice in Wonderland” (Spencer, 31) – Beaton wasn’t usually quite so openly cruel to people’s faces, preferring to reserve the brunt of his barbs for the relative discretion of his diaries (Beaton, 2003). Certainly, Beaton and Julie were vastly different personalities. He the older urbane aesthete: cultured, world-weary, and haughty. She the fresh green ingenue: affable, unaffected, and sincere. It’s possibly why Beaton felt unsympathetic toward her and less inclined to restrain his acid tongue. 

For her part, Julie suggests that at least some of the tension in their relationship stemmed from Beaton’s peculiarly British insecurity over class and social standing. She writes:

“Beaton sort of got my goat. Because we were both British, I quickly picked up on something: he was grander than he had any right to be…Certainly, he acted like a snob.

I began to tease him a little, using my developing cockney accent to good effect when I felt he was being condescending or indifferent. And he liked it! I would glimpse the teeniest crack of a smile on his pursed lips and a slight twinkle in his eye when I deliberately flaunted a lower-class attitude. Eventually I believe we came to appreciate each other, and his glorious costumes made one forget everything else, anyway” (192-93).

It’s a reading that accords with other assessments of Beaton’s complex personality. Born into a comfortable but roundly middle class family – his maternal grandfather was a blacksmith – Beaton was insecure about his social background and feverishly aspirational from an early age (Vickers, 3ff). Enamoured of aristocratic high society, he fetishised the ancien regime world of pedigree, status, and luxury. The fact that that world had effectively vanished, even by the time of his birth, meant that Beaton “longed for acceptance by a society that only existed in his imagination” and so he set about recreating it in fantasy, using his art to “construct artificial Arcadias” of patrician glamour and old world prestige (Conrad, 65). It’s why Beaton proved so brilliant in conjuring the Edwardian idyll of My Fair Lady which he himself described as a “wish-fulfilling opportunity to re-create the world as I remembered it” (cited in Conrad, 65).

These anxieties over status even fed into Beaton’s professional life.  Though he found his earliest and most enduring fame as a society photographer, Beaton took scant pride in the fact, dismissing photography as little more than a trade.  He “hated to be described as a photographer” and sought desperately to make his mark as a ‘serious’ painter and playwright (Vickers, 585). “Being a photographer, beholden to publications and aristocratic or glamorous sitters,” writes Charles Spencer, “involved an element of servility” that only “heightened his inferiority complex and unease” (31). His waspish demeanour was at once a compensatory defense and an act of revenge. “[H]e genuflected to his subjects,” writes Peter Conrad, “while reserving the right to deride them” (64).

Whatever the reasons for his acerbity, there’s no denying that Beaton did well by Julie. His magnificent costumes turned her into the Fair Lady of Broadway while his talented lens brilliantly captured the transformation for posterity.  And the two eventually managed to reach an amicable respect with Julie warmly declaring not long after Beaton’s death, “It’s only now that I’ve come to appreciate his contribution and how amazingly talented he was” (Vickers, xxvi).

Mind, it still didn’t stop Julie getting a bit of her own back for the years of temperamental outbursts and catty put-downs when, via his thinly-veiled proxy in Victor/Victoria, she looks ‘Beaton’ dead in the eye and drily tells him, “why don’t you just go suck an egg?!”

Sources:

Andrews, Julie. Home: A Memoir of My Early Years. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2008.

Beaton, Cecil. The Unexpurgated Beaton: The Cecil Beaton Diaries As He Wrote Them, 1970-1980. Hugo Vickers, ed. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 2003.

Conrad, Peter. “Beaton in Brillantia.” Beaton Portraits. Pepper, Terrence, ed. London: National Portrait Gallery, 2005.

Spencer. Charles. Cecil Beaton: Stage and Film Designs. London: Academy, 1994.

Vickers, Hugo. Cecil Beaton, The Authorised Biography. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1985.

© 2016, Brett Farmer. All Rights Reserved

We’re encouraged to document everything important that happens to us. Birthdays, proposals, baby’s first this or that, crazy nights out when everyone’s outfit is on point. It’s cool, we all do it. What gets tricky is when something great happens and you didn’t capture it, then you feel this sense of loss. That sense of loss and anxiety that you didn’t get to your phone fast enough then completely overtakes the magic of the moment that just took place. So lately, I’ve learned to really live my life, and not worry so much about documenting every split second of it. The most magical, exquisite, spontaneous things happen when there is no time to grab your phone. The best moments of my life have been too fragile, too fleeting, too magical to even try to document them with a camera. And I wish you a lifetime of moments too beautiful to capture on film.
—  Taylor Swift to Glamour Magazine (April 2015)