i was trying to use textures

Other artists: “I have so many brushes in Photoshop! I use this one for clouds, I’ve got this one that does really nice leaves and I have a different one for grass too. This one has just the right texture for doing skin, this one is good for hair, and this one is really good for short fur like on a dog or something. I’ve also seen a really nice brush pack that I am looking forward to trying tonight!”

Me:

So… I’m a HUGE Critical Role nerd… and I’ve been meaning to do some fanart for a while. The most recent episode (104) really struck me and this scene in particular was just amazing. I got a massive itch to try and paint it. Out of context, this might not be too much of a spoiler??

I used this as an opportunity to push my use of texture and color and to try out some new brushes I got recently. Still a long way to go… I’ll be taking what I learned here forward, for sure.

So every time I feel drained, the universe replenishes my thoughts with Black Panther news. Like, it’s really trying to force me to live to February 2018. I’m about to go out to get my $60 to put aside in my Black Panther Funko Pop box for my tickets for the Regular, IMAX 3D, and that AVX thing with the moving chairs. (IDK if that’ll even be enough with the way these ticket prices are set up… I might have to start heauxing on the side)

Like, let’s look at these costumes. Ruth E. Carter is about to murder us in the first degree with beauty, honestly. Colors, patterns, textures, that outline-y shit, POPPING against that brown skin I AM YELLING.

I need a close-up on T’Challa’s jacket. 

These looks, the confidence, the shoulders and arms, I LOVE when women characters actually LOOK STRONG, with toned muscles, VISIBLY STRONG, as opposed to that melted cheese waif look that seems to be in style. I am mad AF that I cannot pull off a shaved head. 

Easily the best looking cast in the MCU. 

Ok and these bodies

Once again, I ask you: HOW WILL WE GET THROUGH THIS. Where will our edges go. Will we ever be the same.

anonymous asked:

How do you draw hair? Whenever I try it just *exaggerated hand motion meaning giant mess*

To be honest, that’s pretty much how I draw hair, too. And honestly? Hair is such a complex, diverse thing. There’s a millions of ways to draw hair based on style and texture. I’ve gotten many asks considering hair, and really, I’ve always been a bit confused on how to answer since hair comes in so many different forms. But! Giving it thought, I realized I can give you a really quick, “basic” guide, until I get a more specific question regarding hair.

So, the first step is to draw the hairlines. Hairlines is basically the “hat” of your head, and is what shapes the forehead. Drawing this before you add hair as a guide will be extremely helpful with the hairstyle, and it adds to the the facial features as well. There’s many different types hairlines, as shown here, and they may all vary in height or shape. Go wild, be experimental! Remember that this is a guide, however, so once you have the hair drawn out, make sure that the hairline isn’t as visible as it is here, but drawn as fine lines instead.

The next thing you can do is to draw a point somewhere on the head which will define the volume and the direction of the hair. This is extremely helpful, since you can draw all the hair strands starting from this point. They may start wherever you find fitting, and you may add more than one (although that adds to the complexity!)

The next step is to think in shapes overlapping each other.  For wavy hair, I like to draw the shapes as teardrops. For puffy hair I like to draw it in circles and ovals. And for straight hair, I like to think in rectangles. It’s all very simple: use the guides mentioned earlier to place the shapes on the head, making them overlap each other until you’re satisfied. Be as messy or simple as you want, and draw them however you’d like as long as it works for you. Don’t try to details yet, though, focus on shapes!

Once you’re satisfied with your result, you may draw the details to your liking. This, I think requires a tutorial on it’s own since hair textures can vary greatly. I’ll show you a quick example below, but again, this isn’t something that works with all hair types. And naturally, once you’re done, remove the head-shape outline. I kept it here just so that you could see how the hair is placed on top of it.

And as you can see, this method works with short hairstyles as well!

In fact, it works for any hairstyle, and you may even mix the basic shapes to get a unique look. (Ignore the lack of pen pressure on this one)

Now, I realize that the ‘finished’ result can be a bit difficult for some to imagine drawing. Again, I still think this requires a tutorial on it’s own, but I will show you how I do it with one of the hairstyles. 

(As you can see, I haven’t drawn out the hairline or a “point”, but this isn’t because I don’t need to, but because I already have it mentally drawn out, it’s not required for this drawing. For some hairstyles, however, I do still draw the hairline/point, especially if the hair is pulled back. But for the sake of simplicity, I will keep it, well, simple.)

Notice how I draw the shapes just as mentioned before? Here, I draw very fine lines in vague teardrop shapes, which I overlay as I draw.

Adding more for volume…

Finishing the look, keep adding more layers…

Defining the “point” as a detail, so that it doesn’t look like some horribly made wig…

Keep reading

how to create aesthetic graphics

(a tutorial by rihleymatthews) 

so, many people requested me a tutorial on these (x and x) graphics, and since they are not hard at all to create, i decided to try explaining to you guys how they come to life. 

WARNING: this is a long and detailed tutorial. Please keep in mind I tried to show all the tricks I normally use for these graphics, so some steps are optional or extra.

you’ll need: 

  • basic to medium photoshop knowledge (such as cropping, blending and shadowing)
  • a concept (a tv show, a character, something you can pick objects to represent them or their porsonality)
  • patience, a lot of patience. 

Keep reading

Random Fitblr Advice

OK, I have been down this road before. Weight loss. Getting in shape. Kicking ass and taking names.

I have been on a 5+ year hiatus. I am slowly making my way back. So, I figured I would talk a lite bit about what I learned the first time around. Give myself some advice. Refresh my memory a bit.


If I could offer any advice to someone starting out (myself) it would be this;

Try everything. From work outs to food. Give everything a chance. So many people say “oh, I just don’t like healthy foods ”. Do not be this person.. You may not like textures or flavors but try them again.

Find new ways too cook your foods. I hate steamed veggies. But growing up and for a long time as an adult that’s all I knew. It was so gross. Smushy mushy mess made me want to vomit. I tried sautéed still too mushy. So I tried baked. A little better. Over time. Over trial and error I have found raw, or sautéed or grilled, for a short time is how I enjoy almost all of my veggies.

Oatmeal, again mushy gross eww right? Just use less water and cook for a shorter time!

My point is give foods a chance try them cooked differently. Try them seasoned differently.

Exercise? You have to find what you like. Reward yourself, try everything and give yourself time to learn to enjoy it. I hated running and now I’m so in love with it.

Try work out dvds, try hula hooping, dancing, cycling, yoga, pilates. And on and on. Don’t just think you have to do push ups if you hate push ups. If you hate your work out you’re not going to do it. Find what you love try everything under the sun. When you find something that makes it fun you’re going to want to do more, and the more you move the more you lose. That’s what it’s all about, its not punishment. Using your body. All the muscles and all the energy. It’s amazing what your body can do. Be amazed at it. Find ways to challenge it, find ways to push yourself to new limits.

And this is what I say to myself, this is what I need to remind myself each day when I’m just thinking oh fuck it I just want to be lazy.

how to get into skincare

I’ve already done a post about how to get into makeup, and one about how to get into SFX, so I figured I might as well make one for skincare. I have extremely sensitive, extremely acne-prone skin, so when it comes to skincare products, I’ve literally tried everything. It’s gotten to the point where I’m the “resident expert” that all of my family and friends come to when they need help figuring out which products to use.

I think a lot of people don’t take proper care of their skin because they have the misconception that it’s time-consuming and/or expensive. Honestly, I spend less than two minutes on skincare on most days, and I only use affordable products that are available at drug stores. No matter who you are, you can afford to take good care of your skin.


product names you’re likely to see, and what they mean:

  • cleanser is just soap that’s gentle enough for the delicate skin on your face. It comes in liquid, cream, and even powder formulas, but all you need to know is that if the label says “cleanser,” then it’s just face wash. If you’re only going to use one skincare product, this is the one you should invest in.
  • Note: You should NEVER use bar soap on your face! The skin on your face is thinner and more delicate than the skin on the rest of your body, and most bar soaps will damage it. There are some cleansers that come in bar form, but as a general rule you should never use a product on your face that wasn’t made specifically to be used on faces. 
  • moisturizer is probably the second most commonly-used product, after cleanser. This is exactly what it sounds like – it’s basically lotion that is specially made to be used on your face. No matter what your skin type is, you should be moisturizing daily. (Proper moisturization actually helps cut down on oily skin in most cases.) 
  • toner (sometimes also called astringent) is a product that is usually applied after cleanser, but before moisturizer. It’s called “toner” because it tones your skin, as well as cleansing any dirt or grime that your cleanser missed. Not everyone needs to use toner, but if you have oily or acne-prone skin, I’d recommend it.
  • a face mask is any product that is made to be used occasionally to give your skin a little extra love. A lot of them are made to address certain issues, like acne, dryness, or dullness. Usually, you apply it and let it sit on your face for a few minutes before you wash it off. I personally try to use a mask on my face once or twice a week whenever I have the time, but they’re more of a treat than a necessity. (And you probably shouldn’t use them every day.) 
  • exfoliators or exfoliating scrubs are products designed to buff away dead skin cells. Usually, they have some kind of gritty texture to them (like sugar grains) that scrubs off the dead skin. Like face masks, they’re more of a treat than a necessity, but unlike with face masks, too much exfoliating can actually hurt your skin. You should never exfoliate more than 2-3 times a week, and never, ever exfoliate two days in a row.
  • pore strips are kind of like waxing strips for your face, but instead of removing hair, they remove blackheads and other junk clogging your pores. I would not recommend pore strips to someone who is new to skincare, and like with exfoliators, using them too often can really damage your skin. If you’re going to use them, you should never use them more than once every three days. 

There are other product names that you might see floating around online (like “essence” or “facial oil”), but these are the basic products that you need to know about. Honestly, if you have a good cleanser, toner, and moisturizer (plus maybe a face mask or two for occasional pampering), then you don’t really need any other products, because those three will get the job done. 


how to build your own skincare routine:

  1. The first step is to understand your skin type. The three most common types are: dry, oily, and combination (in between dry and oily). Shop for products that are designed and labelled for your skin type. (If you have a lot of acne, look for products labelled “acne care” or something along those lines. If you have a lot of skin allergies, or if your skin doesn’t react well to harsh chemicals, look for products made for sensitive skin.)
  2. Go to the nearest Walmart, CVS, Walgreen’s, ect. with $20, and find the skincare aisle. Keeping your skin type in mind, look for a good cleanser and a good moisturizer. (If you have oily or acne-prone skin, you might want to pick up a toner as well.) If you can, look for generic brands (I know Walmart carries one called Equate) that make products with the same ingredients as name-brand products, but significantly cheaper. (If you’re looking for cruelty-free products, check out the brands Burt’s Bees and Yes To.)
  3. If you want to make things easier, you can buy all of the products you need in a pack. (Like this, or this.) These usually contain a cleanser, a toner, and a moisturizer. 
  4. Every morning when you first wake up, wash your face with the cleanser and pat it dry with a clean towel. Then apply the toner, if you bought one – you do not wash this off. Then (after waiting a few seconds for the toner to take effect), apply your moisturizer. That’s literally all there is to it. If you’re a morning shower person, you can save time by washing your face in the shower, then applying toner and moisturizer after you get out.
  5. Every night before you go to bed, do the same thing. (Of course, if you wear makeup, you’ll have to remove it, either with makeup remover or with warm water, before you wash your face.) 
  6. Right before bed is a good time to use face masks/exfoliators/pore strips, if you want. I always wash my face first, then skip over my toner and go straight into applying the mask/exfoliator/strip, and let it sit for as long as the directions on the packaging indicate. After I wash it off, I use my moisturizer like always.
  7. Congratulations! You now have a skincare routine!


This post goes into detail of all the products and tricks I use in my own personal routine, if you’re curious. 

I hope this post was helpful! If you have any questions about specific products, or about treating specific skin conditions, feel free to message me and I’ll try to help in any way I can. 

masterlist (there’s more beauty/skincare tips on there, if you’re interested)

anonymous asked:

i just started using watercolors, can you tell me about your process/share some tips?

Well first of all, congrats on trying watercolors! I’m by no means an expert yet but I’ll do my best to walk you through my process using some of the WIP pictures I have from previous pieces. There’s a ton to cover and I won’t get it all so feel free to ask more specific questions if you need help. 

My first tip would be to play with whatever tools you have to figure out what feels right for you. If you don’t have any tools yet, I suggest the Sakura Koi Pocket Field Sketch Box (pictured below) since it’s really nice quality, comes with a water brush, and usually costs like $15-$25 depending on size/where you buy it. If that’s still outside of your price range, the first watercolors I ever did were with old crayola palettes and it worked out fine, it just took way more layers and time to get the color depth I wanted.

As for paper, I’m still looking for the perfect one but just make sure it’s watercolor paper (cold press means there’s a texture, hot press is smooth) or multimedia and not like, printer paper. As long as it’s relatively thick, it should be ok but might buckle when too much water is added.

Don’t worry too much about perfection when learning how to use your equipment. Make lines, blend colors, try making washes, etc. When I came back to watercolors, I mostly did a lot of meditative painting, where I doodled whatever felt right. Some of them even came out real cool looking?? 

When I sit down to do a more detailed piece or commission, I have a five-part process I pretty consistently use these days. It goes like this: 

1) Traditional (or digital) sketch/concept phase. The below pic is from a pop-art commission concept where I really liked the flow of her hair.

2) Digital lineart (cleaning up/refining concept sketches)

3) Print the lineart and lightbox it to watercolor paper using either a hard graphite pencil (very light lines) or colored lead. I still lightbox with this ancient hunk of junk but you can even use a window or your computer screen (VERY CAREFULLY) to lightbox if you don’t have one. 

Here’s what some of my pieces looks like after being transferred: 

I think it’s important to note that you should keep a piece of scrap paper under your hand while working on the watercolor paper, since the oils in your skin can lead to areas where the paint won’t bind to the paper properly. I’ve had cases where I finished a background wash only to find an absolutely perfect thumbprint in the center of it. 

4) Ink the lines. Make sure your pens are waterproof. If they’re not, I’ll talk about a way to get around that later so skip right to painting for now. 

I used micron technical pens for the above piece. If you don’t know if you have waterproof pens, make a test chart like the one below. Mine involved copics, watercolor, and super heavy scrubbing to see how easily the pen came off when wet. 

I’ve also “inked” after painting by using more concentrated lines of watercolor instead of actual ink. The below painting was too cute and pastel and I didn’t want to ruin it with black lines, so I used that technique here (along with some red pencil)

5) Paint! I’m not really consistent with this step but my main tip is: BE PATIENT! If you want flat blocks of color, wait until each wash is fully dry before moving on to one next to it. If you don’t, they’ll bleed into each other. This is also true when trying to create shadows with hard edges instead of soft blending. Not being patient enough is my #1 cause of “crap I have to start this over”.

(The weird coloration on the lines above is actually dried frisket I put over certain sections of the piece to protect them but it ended up being more of a hassle than anything else for this style of piece.)

So, what if you didn’t have waterproof pens? You can easily reverse steps 4&5 and paint first, wait for it to dry very well, and then ink (shown below). 

The finished piece looked like this: 

I hope this was helpful!

If you want to see any of my WIPs/ask me questions, you can find me on Twitter and Instagram

Also, my commission slots are open and if you like my work and want to leave me a tip, you can always buy me a coffee :)

2

“I want to feel safe again. I want to go home to Ravka.”

“Then I’ll take you there. We’ll set fire to raisins or whatever you heathens do for fun.”

ck countdown challenge week one: favourite ship → matthias x nina

anonymous asked:

On the Lucas Baker picture how did you make the shed looking lettering on his jacket? It looks good and I'd like to be able to try it

Thanks anon! It’s an easy trick and there are many ways of achieving that grunge effect. I use Photoshop but I’m sure there are ways to apply this technique in other programs as well.

You’ll need two layers: a transparent design/text on top of a solid background color. We will erase parts of the design instead of adding grunge to the whole pic. This way the design will work even if you change its color or the color of the bg. Here’s Cappy, let’s fuck him up!

The first way of doing this is by finding a good textured, spongy brush. I usually use the Natural Sponge from @kyletwebster‘s Megapack. Set your brush mode to “clear” on the top toolbar. This will turn it into an eraser!

Now just go ham on the drawing you’re grunging up! The more randomly you erase, the better! You can switch brushes to vary shapes and edges. Don’t forget to switch up brush sizes to add smaller scratches too! Tadaa!

If you think you’re not very good at making things look random, there’s a second way of doing this. Textures are your friends! I usually get them from textures.com. As a first step, turn your texture black and white (Shift+Ctrl+U) and play with the levels (Ctrl+L) until it’s mostly white with some black spots.

Then select the black pixels with the Magic Wand tool (make sure that “contiguous” is turned off on the top bar so your tool selects all the black pixels on your canvas). Copy all the selected pixels and paste them on a new transparent layer over your design. Feel free to move the texture around, resize it if it looks better. Now all you have to do is select the grunge you just added (by Ctrl+left clicking on its layer in your Layers window) and press Delete while standing on your design layer. This way only the selected pixels will be erased from your design.

After this, you can delete the grunge layer and enjoy your nastied-up design or do another round of what you just did to destroy it even more. If you want smaller scratches in it, switch to brush and touch it up with the first technique I described.

For Lucas’ logo, I used the brush only. I like to be able to control where the damage happens :) Hope this helped!

Hello again guys!  Here are some tips about brushes- once again, I’m no expert, so explore these points on your own!  Some of these are a little more abstract, while others are to help deal with minor brush annoyances ;)

1.  PHOTOSHOP BRUSHES are based on a “stamp” system, not a brush system like some painting programs. That is why photoshop brushes are great for things like chains and repeated patterns, but you have to fiddle with them a bit to make them look natural.
2.  The first brush setting underneath the brush panel you must become familiar with is “transfer.” this tab plays with the opacity and flow of the brush.  
3.  As stated in previous tutorials, the essential hotkeys for brushwork are:
[/]= brush size larger and smaller
alt= eyedropper tool
Numbers= opacity of brush
Shift+Number= flow of brush
4.  Brush icon not showing up/ behaving correctly?  Usually one of four things: Caps Lock is on, Edit in Quick Mask Mode is on (which can be found on your left main tool panel), the brush blend mode is on a different setting (found next to opacity and flow), or you have something selected (crtl+d will do the trick). 
5.  DON’T knock the photoshop brush sets that come with the program.  Many artists I know use these brushes while tweaking the settings.  Consider utilizing settings such as dual brush and texture to make these ordinary brushes great.
6.  Brushes with large amounts of detailed texture tend to pixelate and not work correctly when scaled down too far. 
7.  Trying to create a natural brush tip? Brush settings>Shape Dynamics> Angle Jitter> Control: Direction. This will make the brush more natural and dependent on how you stroke your pen. 
8. Do you use a signature/watermark a lot? A certain shape or pattern? Make it a brush. 
9. When changing things like opacity and flow in both the brush settings and the layer settings, Photoshop will sort of get “stuck” there, and you will see the number highlighted.  Simply hit enter (don’t bother reaching for the mouse!) and it will go away.
10.  Rotating the canvas will help you with your brushstrokes. Shift+R rotates the canvas in nice equal increments, and is a easy way to set the rotation back to 0.
11. Texture brushes just don’t look right?  Make a selection, zoom out, and make the brush slightly bigger while you paint. Think of them as big sponges, not brushes.

Thanks again guys! I have a lot of tutorial requests from you, and I’ll be working through more soon! 

Drawmaevedraw

How to draw

HAIR


Don’t forget to download the elemaps and brushes Text !

Download elemap 

Download brushtext


These brushes are the ones which I use the most :

RUSSESKETCH is for sketching

CYAPEN is for blending

And Crayon is (one of SAI’s default brushes ) for filling


Let’s begin with a messy sketch :

On a new layer, you need to use the “RUSSESKETCH brush”

and you don’t need to worry about drawing neatly!


Make a new layer to draw over the sketch.

(with a colour of your choice) Use CRAYON brush and make sure to not leave any gaps!

Then take the bucket and fill it in!

Then you will fuse your 2 layers together


Now its time to blend! Take the “CYAPEN brush”, then take another colour of your choice ,you can add even more details on your hair and try to give it an interesting shape!


TIPS

1: You can try many elemaps! It might give you some interesting textures to use!


2: Feel free to change the scale, density or texture and then try to experiment in even more interesting ways!

3: Don’t be shy! Try messing with the contrast! It might give an interesting colour to the hair!

4: It works for colour gradient!

5: If you want to make the texture and shape of your haircut better, don’t use the eraser! Keep your brush and click on the transparent button!



If there is something you don’t understand or something I should talk about and explain even more, feel free to send me a question! I will try my best to explain!

I hope this can help some artists to improve!

Thanks  @jendra82 without you i couldn’t do this tutorial !

☆ SHADING TUTORIAL BY ONCHA ☆

hoping it will be useful for some of you! (灬╹ω╹灬)
since many, MANY of you requested it, i spent a little time on this one even if it’s messy, hoping that some of you guys may find replies on their questions about “what color do i put here???”

== so, let’s start this tiny tiny lesson ==

★ i’ll start by saying that when it comes to shading, many people think that the only color that fits is black or dark grey, which is the WRONGEST thing you could ever do! even in realism, where you can see shadows that seem greyish, there is a little color, and that is because the surface you are putting shading on, reflects light, which is actually colored and has a pattern/texture on it! clothing, bandages, wood, plastic, rubber, fur, skin, lattex - everything reflects light on its own way, and so has a colored shading. in art, this thing is even more emphatized to make it look pleasing, colorful and catchy, so i drew some little examples to show how i use colors for my shading technique!

★ the first column is made by pastel rainbow colors, the second column is made of normal saturated colors, and the third one is a grey scale.
i tried some different hues and palettes for each one, even if you can see that i frequently use blue and purple.
those two are, in fact, the most used colos in shading, and works super well on basically everything, maybe making them darker or ligher depending if you are using pastel colors or not.
my shading is based on color contrast, infact you can see that i use blues on warm colors and purple/pinks on cold colors: it creates depth and adds a nice effect to it.

★ same with grey scale!
look at how colorful can grey, black and white look! it only needs a little bit of experiments, don’t be afraid to change your shading hue: colors won’t be hurt and you will be happy with the result! ^w ^

★ the same thing i do with shading, i’ll do for lights and lightspots, just with an overlay layer instead of multiply! most used are obviously pastel colors, but i often see people use white for it! instead of that, try a light pink, yellow or blue: you will be super satisfied of the result!
the only colors that often don’t show well overlay layers are neon pink or red: they are too bright, and the only colors that show a little bit are light blue or yellow. Instead of an overlay, maybe try a screen or anormal type layer, just as when you are coloring pitch black!

★ THE “WARMER” ★
what i call “warmer” is just a plain peach/orangeish color that some artists use to make shading less plain. Sometimes, even if you blend and blur your shading edges, they will still be “too cold/plain” to look at - and that’s what the warmer solves! don’t worry about how cold/warm your shading is, a peachy pink will always help you: put some of it ( just a thin line or a little blurred one ) on the edges of your shading and blend it until you like the result.
as shown in the picture, it will be a lot better!
some examples of my art with warmer use:
* pixel practice - luka (mostly used on hair and sweater)
* a day at the beach! (hat shadow on hair, thighs and body in general)
* stargaze used on hair and clothing.

★ GENERAL TIPS ★
*use different shading layers when you draw, don’t just stuck yourself on a single one! i am used to make two of them: one fot the basic/lighter shading, more detailed and soft, and another one for the darker parts of the shading, with a colder color such as a medium blue or a sky blue!

*mix different textures when you are shading! for example, try to add a granulated pattern/texture to your clothing layer!

*remember that different materials reflect light in different ways: you can’t shade fur the same way you shade a tshirt! tshirt will have harder shading, more defined, while skin and fur (velvety things in general) will be more blutter. Same with a ribbon, that will have soft shading and really hard light because ribbons are usually not matte, but shiny material!

*try different blendings on different layers! if for a first layer you blended your shading more to add depht to the subject, the darker/second layer could be a little sharper and defined when it comes to shading tools.

🌶🌶🍞🥗Lunch today is a massive spicy “tuna” salad sarnie. Super tasty and made without oil!

Recipe for “tuna” spread (makes two very generous portions or four regular portions)

1 can chickpeas (drained and rinsed)
¼ cup canned sweet corn
2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 tsp black pepper
1-3 tbsp cholula (the garlic one works best)
1 tsp maggi liquid seasoning ( or just salt)
2 tbsp fresh cut chives
2 tbsp fresh cut dill
Optional 30g of low fat hummus to bind.

Just used a potato masher to crush the chickpeas (you still want some texture so try not to go mad)
Then all you gotta do is add everything give it a mix and stick it on some bread ( I am the queen of complicated recipes 😂)

I added some red onion, spinach and sriracha to make it fancy 😜

Holy Crystal

Where I Got It
Cost: $15.48
(You can find this item for cheaper on eBay and even on Amazon. I bought this particular one because I have prime right now. I can’t speak for other sellers, but my shipping experience with this seller was positive. It came in original packaging, well protected, and in good condition. I got two day shipping and had no issues with tracking.)

In the video I show each side, and how they sound when I use them. There is no talking in the video. Below I break my review down by reviewing each side separately in order of when they are shown in video. I also give each sides description exactly as written in the instructions that came with the crystal. Some of them are written kinda odd and confusing because they are translated from Chinese.

•Soft Silicone
Description: “Small soft tactility that have the function of blood circulation and massage.”
Review: This side is the side I find myself using the most. I am a tactile seeker and I have issues with picking my skin when my anxiety gets bad. This side is AMAZING for both of those things. The lil nubs are pretty soft and easy to pinch, pick, and feels nice to rub my thumb on. It’s a really great tactile feel, and makes a satisfying noise when you move your finger over them lightly.

•Button
Description: “Game controller button experience, using ABS material to enhance texture.
Review: These buttons really do have the same feel as a controller. They also make a great click noise. I like clicking all the buttons at once.

•Rotating Disk
Description: "Do you want to a rotating disk? You can come and try it.”
Review: This side is so nice!! In my opinion it’s way better than the one on the fidget cube. It’s textured, it clicks when you press it, very easy to turn, and is slightly raised. I like to turn it with both my fingers from the side. This is one of my favorite sides to use.

•Joystick
Description: “360 rotation joystick”
Review: This joystick is better than the fidget cubes as well. As you can see from the video it has WAY more range, and is actually like an Xbox controller joystick. It is very nice.

•Switch
Description: “You can have experience of the ubiquitous switch rhythm.”
Review: The switch has a very satisfying feel when you press it, and it makes a nice click. I like to put my whole finger on it and click it back and forth.

•Soft Button
Description: “People who like pressing ball pen can try it”
Review: In my opinion this is actually more satisfying than a ball point pen cause the button is silicone and feels soft and nice to push. The clicking feel and sound is exactly like a pen though.

•Sliding Blocks
Description: “Sliding the sliding block to adjust own life rhythm.”
Review: First of all, these all slide so smoothly and without and issues. I like the fact that the middle one is a little higher than the other two because it feels nice when I move them all up and down at the same time with my thumb. They are a really nice silent feature.

•Smiling Faces
Description: “Is a face very cute, it won’t be angry no matter how much you pinch.”
Review: These little faces are made of silicone so they are nice and squishy! Very nice to pinch! Also, they are great to just run my finger over. The bigger face that has its own side sometimes makes a pretty satisfying noise when you pinch it, if you pinch it right. All the faces are hollow on the inside, making them easier to pinch.

•Silicone Rope
Description: “Free shrinkage, it can be hung anywhere and not afraid of missing.”
Review: The strap is convenient for obvious reasons, but it’s also nice to fidget with because it is silicone. It is stretchy and it feels nice to roll between my fingers.

•Gear
Description: “The side has three gears which can be poked and rolled, spreading voice of clear and harmony.”
Review: At first I was bummed these where so easy to turn, but after I played with it more and more I began to like it a lot. I like just running my fingers over them, and spinning them super fast.

Final thoughts:
Over all I think this thing is great! Yeah, it’s bigger than the fidget cube, but that’s because it has a lot more things to fidget with! Plus, I personally like that it’s bigger cause the fidget cube would make my hands cramp up bad if I used it for too long. Its about the size of a baseball. It’s light weight and all the sides work great and have multiple ways to fidget/stim with them. I know that whoever designed these things probably got the concept from the Antsy Lab fidget cube, but in my opinion the Holy Crystal is way better than any of the fidget cubes real or knockoff. It’s a tactile seekers dream come true! I think anyone could benefit from this toy, but especially people with autism, sensory issues, ADHD, anxiety, and skin picking. If you need to keep your hands busy, this is the toy for you!

(If you have any questions about this item feel free to leave an ask)

ziggy9911  asked:

Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

Layered, interior spaces:

You get the idea.

Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you.

-Jake Wyatt