i stalk the tag

spaceputah  asked:

hey uhhhh sorry for kinda stalking ur curse au tag but i just read your fic and? i legitimately cried for most of it its gorgeously written and i feel like i could honestly feel the characters emotions jfc, and the scene where lance leaves keith ?!?! i actually cried so hard oh my god,,,, youre amazing

haha no worries!!! i’m really glad you liked it!!! that scene was so much fun/so hard to write, because i knew i wanted them to have a fight but i needed it to be hard for both of them, so they’re both SUPER miserable in that scene and that was difficult but at the same time, getting to let them both openly BE miserable was cathartic in a way? IDK i’m glad you liked the fic tho!! thanks for reading!! 

I am really tired yall.

Lemme just preface this with saying that I am a writer. I have been writing for most of my life. I have taken actual classes about writing and about what fiction can offer you, me, and people as a whole. I have won an award for something that I wrote. I know and love fiction, be it in written form, graphic novels, or film. It is all so good and complex and it’s something I am passionate about. That said, let’s get into this.

A good majority of the discourse that goes on in most of the fandoms I’m in stem from the idea that violence and forbidden sexual acts in fiction will encourage those actions in reality. It is important to know, firstly, that the only time this happens is when a person is immature enough or not mentally healthy enough to distinguish reality from fiction. Growing up, my parents would often stop horror movies (back when I first started watching them) to ask me questions. To be fair, they were pretty shitty people, but in this one aspect, they were so good about making sure I knew this difference. “You know this is just a movie, right? None of the stuff on the tv is real.” They’d assure before continuing the film.

It’s not real.

Now, half of the stuff I read or watched back then was nowhere near pushing boundaries or making me think critically about society or whatever. However, I knew that what I watched wasn’t real. It was images on a screen. If I don’t like what I’m seeing, I can walk away. It doesn’t have to affect me, personally,  unless I let it.

Now, lets circle back. School. College. I took a writing class that used this book:

Granted, it was a screenwriting class and most of the chapters were about various script formats, but the beginning chapters focused on why we write and why we make the stories we do.

It had a section in it describing how human needs and desires are met through fiction. It detailed those needs in a list. This list:

Please draw your attention to the ones on the list that say that fictions helps people to:

Be purged of unpleasant emotions

To have vicarious but controlled emotional experiences

To confront, in a controlled situation, the horrible and terrible

To explore taboo subjects without guilt

Just because you personal don’t need various forms of ‘taboo’ media, doesn’t mean that others don’t. Media, in all of its forms, is a way for people to explore things safely. It’s an outlet that doesn’t harm anyone and it offers the creator and viewer/reader a safe way of exploring the complexities of situations (or in some cases relationships) that these people do not want to be involved in irl. Because we can distinguish reality from fiction. Because none of us are going out killing people or getting into abusive relationships or fucking our sibling.

While being critical of the media we consume is important and it is vital to dissect the whys of the media being created, there is a line between creating open discussion about these taboos, about the society and personal experiences that makes one need these outlets, and verbally abusing and harassing strangers.

If you want to create a dialogue about media or a ship you don’t agree with, fine. Talk about it. Dissect it. Really dig deep into the human condition and the psychology behind these outlets, but don’t shame people for them to the point of telling them to kill themselves or telling them they are human garbage or what the fuck ever.

Fiction isn’t always meant to be picturesque. It’s not always going to be SFW. If that isn’t your cup of tea, then great. Stop going into the tags of things that make you feel unhealthy. You do you. Keep yourself safe. Stop continuously exposing yourself to content that you can’t swallow. To keep getting involved, to keep harassing people, to keep abusing strangers shows that you don’t give a damn about the content. You need an excuse to bully someone else and indulge in holier-than-thou circle jerks with other people who also have no sense of what fiction is for.

9

i think we all know how Bum reacted: 

im still not over his black hair ok somebody please help me bREATHE.

SPEEDPAINT!!

2

*I was going to do jeuin aswell but my mom took my tablet ;^; ill add her when i get time next week (wont be very active because of finals but ill still answer asks )*

Finaly more actor au 🙈 took a while but i like the way it turned out❤❤

vintage Carmilla fandom things
  • L/Elle/Ell/Eleanor Discourse
  • Is Danny a werewolf?
  • Is Danny Elle?
  • Is the Dean Carmilla’s mother (this question came up earlier for people who’d read the book than those who hadn’t)?
  • H*llence vs. H*llstein 
  • I’m not spelling out either of those because virtual fucking blood was spilled in that ship war and it still hasn’t totally died and I don’t want to arouse the ire of anyone in the tags
  • people stalking Natasha and her mom
  • I’m not sure anyone ever figured out why they stalked her mom
  • One time someone shipped Carmilla/the Dean and tried to hold a Carmilla And Lilita Week for people to make fanworks about them. 
  • Most fans were understandably put off by the idea of shipping someone with her abusive mother figure and nobody contributed except this one person who made us all deeply uncomfortable for a week in the tags
  • thE DAYS WE SPENT THINKING CARMILLA WAS DEAD
  • I’M PRETTY SURE THAT EPISODE DROPPED ON A THURSDAY SO WE HAD TO LIVE WITH IT ALL WEEKEND
  • I HAD JUST GOTTEN OFF A PLANE TO SEE MY PARENTS FOR THANKSGIVING WHEN SOMEONE TOLD ME AND I HAD TO GO CRY IN AN AIRPORT BATHROOM EVEN THOUGH I DOUBTED IT WAS FOR KEEPS
  • Stars and Candles (early name for Hollstein, before the current name solidified)
  • Carmilla’s bangs. that doesn’t seem like a big thing but some people got like personally affronted when Natasha decided to grow her bangs out
  • “See that subscribe button? You should click it.”
  • VerveGirlTV
  • Laura having no fashion sense to speak of and straight hair
  • Perry dressing like a Sunday school teacher. From 1987. 
  • Coming up with names for Laura’s dad
  • “But what if Carmilla’s not a vampire in this version?”
  • Yes, that was an actual theory. I saw it a surprising amount considering it was made clear from almost her first appearance that she was a Massive Vampireface from Vampireland
  • I’ve just realized Tuesgays and Thursgays are becoming a vintage fandom thing and now I’m sad
Tips for debating

I’ve debated in high school and have been seeing a lot of arguments stem from discussions about sensitive topics recently. So, I figured why not help others by giving tips so they can have an informative discussion. 

  • Be respectful - your opponent’s opinion may seem ridiculous even wrong to you but they also could believe that about your opinion. So try not to make your opponent seem dumb or inconsiderate because their views are different.
  • DO NOT USE AD HOMINEM ATTACKS
  • Try to use legitimate sources as much as possible when using facts.
  • Listen to your opponent - their side of the debate is just as important as yours, no matter how idiotic or frustrating it may seem to you.
  • Stay calm - try as much as possible to not get angry, no matter how ignorant the other person’s view may be.
  • Ask questions - if you don’t understand certain aspects of your opponent’s argument then ask.
  • Admit when you make a mistake - this is the hardest part of a debate, admitting when you were in the wrong. 

hopefully, this will help those of you who wish to change someone’s opinion.

who needs a lover to feel the pain of breaking up when your anime ends and gives you the same exact feelings

So you want to interact with a fanfiction author

Great! I’m glad you want to reach out and start a conversation with the many creative, giving people who take time out of their busy lives to pen the stories that have captured your imagination. This post is going to cover leaving reviews, giving constructive criticism, and a few do’s and don’t’s.

If you like a fic, leave a review! You can do this a couple different ways.

Reblogging with tags. Every single creative person I know, be they writer or artist or musician, religiously stalks the tags when people reblog their work. Tags are an amazing way to communicate with a creative, especially if you’re shy about sending them a message directly or are afraid your comment will go unnoticed in their inbox.

Don’t know what to say in the tags? Think about the moment you decided you were going to reblog this piece instead of just hitting the “Like” button. Was it a particularly well done piece of dialogue? A description that made you feel like you were a part of the story instead of just reading it? A scenario you’d never considered before but changed the way you thought about [character a, situation b, or fandom c]? There’s a reason you’re taking time to reblog instead of like, so let them know why! Not every reblog needs to be a tag flail.

Alternatively, you can send the author a message. Fanmail if you’re shy and don’t want your adoration made public. Sometimes, if I don’t have time to tag a fic the way I want for whatever reason, I’ll like the piece and then shoot the author a fanmail or an ask telling them what I liked. This is also acceptable. Who doesn’t like getting mail? Crazy people who don’t use social media, that’s who.

Ok, but wait. What if you DON’T like what the author has done with their fic? What then? Yes, there are options.

Option #1: You ignore the fic. You neither like nor reblog the story. You and the author both move on with your lives. You may choose this option at any time. It is not necessary to let the author or anyone else know you have chosen this option.

Option #2: Ask the author why they chose to go that route. Politely. We’ll go over what that means later.

Option #3: Give constructive criticism. Now. Be careful with this one. Creatives are sensitive people. Make sure the author is open to it before you go barrelling into their ask box. If you message me, even on anon, saying, “Hey, I just read your latest fic and I have some concrit I wanted to run by you. Is that ok?” that is perfectly fine. If my answer is yes, go for it. If not, see Option #1.

What is concrit? Glad you asked.

This is concrit: “I totally get the vibe you were going for with that scene, but I was a little confused about the angles of the body parts. I don’t think you meant for them to be doing xyz there. It just took me out of the moment a little.”

This is NOT concrit: “You’re actually not very good at writing smut. You should probably just let [other person] write it and stick to what you’re good at. Which is not smut.”

What’s the difference? In the first one, you acknowledge what you think the author was going for. You explain what has you confused. You explain how you interpreted it. And then you leave a way for the author to contact you to respond to the concrit. You could be right. Maybe the author’s beta was having an off day and missed that awkward elbow maneuver. Maybe they don’t have a beta.  Or maybe it’s you that’s missed something. The second example is rude. This criticism is not designed to help the author. It is designed to tear them down and discourage them.

Some people adore concrit. Some people only want it before they publish a piece. Some don’t want it at all. None of these are wrong.

SIDE NOTE FOR AUTHORS: If you ask for concrit, do not be upset, offended, or throw a tantrum when someone sends you a respectful message. You did not want concrit. You wanted to ask for concrit and revel when no one sent you anything. Those are not the same things. Concrit, when given correctly, is designed to make you, the author, a better writer.

Ok, let’s go back to Option #2 now. Where you liked the piece overall, but the characters are acting a little wonky. Something’s not quite right, you think. You don’t really have any concrit, but you want to say something. Here’s what you can do, especially if the author is posting a work in progress.

Acceptable: “Hey! I just read the latest chapter of [amazing story you’ve been following since day one]. I’m enjoying the story so far, but this last one has me a little confused. Why did [character a] do [this]? I feel they would have done [that]. Am I missing something?”

Not acceptable: “Your latest chapter was a big disappointment. I feel like you just don’t know the characters anymore. There’s no way in hell [characters a and b] would be [doing xyz]. I’m sorry, I’m unfollowing you.”

In the first example, you let the author know you like their work. You are making an attempt to understand their vision. You give them a specific example of what’s bothering you. You acknowledge that there may be things coming that you aren’t aware of yet. In the second, you’re an asshat who is wasting bandwidth. The tone has shifted from commenting on the story to commenting on the author.

And here are a few general DO’s and DON’T’S:

DO tell an author you are excited to read the next chapter.

DON’T send an author a message saying only “update soon” less than five minutes after the new chapter was posted.

DO speculate on what’s going to happen next.

DON’T tell the author how to write their story.

DO ask your author how the writing process is going.

DON’T ask your author why they haven’t updated yet.

DO send your author love.

DON’T send your author anon hate.

THERE ARE NO PROFESSIONAL FANFICTION AUTHORS. (We’re not gonna talk about she-who-must-not-be-named of the fifty shade variety). Every single fic author has a job, family, friends, school, religion, other hobbies, or sleep equally vying for their attention. Respect their time, respect their work, respect them as human beings, and we’ll all get along fine.