i should really go and be productive

Some trans guy tips from your dad
  • Don’t try that mascara/arm hair shit. I’ve been passing for more than a year with short, blond arm hair. It’s not an important secondary sex characteristic.
  • Board shorts (without pockets in the front) do wonders to minimize the width of your hips. Always choose board shorts over swim trunks. Choose them over cargo shorts if it’s appropriate.
  • Speak from your chest, never from your head.
  • The goal of binding should not be an entirely flat chest; you should bind for your body type.
  • GC2b makes the best binders out there, and their products are designed specifically for trans men/transmasculine people.
  • It might seem useless if you’re pre-T, but working out can be a big help for dysphoria.
  • Eyebrows are really important to passing pre-testosterone. Muss that shit up. Make them look unkempt.
  • When you ask for a haircut, make sure the edges in the back are squared, not rounded.
  • If you have peach fuzz, I would advise shaving it. Cis guys shed theirs when they go through puberty. Shaving can also help with facial hair dysphoria.
  • Don’t ever buy a binder from Amazon. They run in strange sizes (I was an XXL even though I’m a M in GC2b) and take weeks/months to come. It’s also difficult to breathe in them after a few hours.
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PSA: don’t flush tampons.

They are not designed to be flushed, and the vast majority of plumbing and sewage systems aren’t designed to process them. Even if they make it down your toilet, they can build up in your pipes or septic tank and cause expensive damage and disgusting, smelly backups. Waste products and toilet paper are all that should be flushed - in some places, even toilet paper is a no-go. Other products marketed as “flushable” are just trying to get you to buy them.

Menstrual products are expensive, but having your plumbing replaced because it’s become choked on tampons and is now overflowing through every drain in the building is way more expensive. Please dispose of them responsibly. Sincerely, someone who makes minimum wage and has to clean public bathrooms.

I was taking today about how lucky we are that the SW cast is amazing af.

Carrie Fisher was a badass who made everyone laugh and was so completely honest and open and inspiring, loved her mom and her daughter and her dog, and is our hero forever.

Mark Hamill is too precious for this cruel world, makes fun of Trump in the best ways, loves interacting with fans,

Harrison Ford gives no fucks, has brushes with death on a regular basis, married Ally McBeal, and despite being Grumpy McGrumps, is actually so kind.

James Earl Jones is Darth Vader, but also Mufasa in The Lion King, has Broadway and film credits, was in The Sandlot, openly told people he thought Vader was lying about being Luke’s father and thinks it’s so cool that he was wrong, and is too cool for everyone.

Ewan McGregor is precious and and tries very hard to pretend that he isn’t a total Star Wars fanboy, but is totally a Star Wars fanboy, has a beautiful singing voice, mostly tweets about charity, wants an Obi-wan movie as much as we do, and is a wonderful human.

Hayden Christensen was sometimes given the worst dialogue but never complained or shit talked George Lucas after the fact, has a smile that is worth my whole heart, made lightsaber noises while filming the duels, and is super polite.

Natalie Portman was just a teenager when she was cast and was such a good student that she missed promotional events to study for exams, went to Harvard, started a cruelty free shoe brand, and has an Oscar.

Daisy Ridley is so talented that her screen tests for Rey will make you cry, is full of energy, loves Rey as much as we do, compliments random fans on their fan art, and has handled the weird/crazy amount of attention and fame she has now with so much grace.

John Boyega is from London, but is the son of Nigerian immigrants and is always so proud of his heritage, loves Finn, was invited to be an Academy voter (aka one of the people who gets to vote for the Oscars), started his own production company, and has a smile that will make you smile.

Adam Driver was in the military, went to Juilliard, is insanely talented but isn’t the least bit arrogant about it, has hair that should be ensured for $10,000, is really shy, and is genuinely precious.

I could go on with all of the amazing cast members with smaller roles - Billy Dee Williams, Alec Guinness, Liam Neeson, Christopher Lee, Oscar Isaac, Lupita Nyong'o, Domnhall Gleeson, etc. but then we’d be here all night.

BUT GUYS, STAR WARS IS BLESSED WITH THIS BEAUTIFUL LIST OF ACTORS.

FEEL FREE TO ADD TO THE LIST. ADD THE OTHER AMAZING ACTORS, OR ADD OTHER AMAZING FACTS ABOUT THE ONES I LISTED.

Why You Guys Need to Stop Boycotting The 100

Time for a rant:
First off let me say I’m a clexa shipper, so I went through the same thing you guys did when Lexa died. But what I’m about to rant about is more serious than any fictional ship.
Okay, for all of you people who’re not watching The 100 anymore because you’re upset, that’s fine! It’s completely okay to stop watching a show you no longer like. But to you shits who’re actively trying to get The 100 cancelled and boycotting it, stop. Seriously, you guys may think that you’re doing the right thing and trying to stop queer bating but you’re destroying tons of innocent people’s livelihood. You’re trying to cancel a show that’s queer bated, which it bad, but that was a decision that was made by a few. You’re taking away the jobs of tons of people for instance, Eliza Taylor, Lindsey Morgan, Bob Morley, Marie Avgeropoulos, Devon Bostick, Henry Ian Custick, Richard Harmon, Paige Turco, Chris Larkin, Isaiah Washington, Zach McGowan, cinematographer, floor manager, graphics coordinator, stage manager, makeup artists, production manager, technical directors, stunt coordinators, video control operator, composer, colorist, editors, foley artist, costume designer, location manager, production and set designer, etc. Should I go on? And I know what you guys are saying, that they’ll be better off working on something that’s not the show, but not if the show gets cancelled! They’re way less likely to get hired (maybe even ever again) if the show gets cancelled, it looks bad for them. Name one successful actor from a failed tv show. Hmmm, don’t really know anyone do you? And then think about some minor workers on the set who might not even get a job ever again if The 100 gets cancelled. All because you guys had to have a fit and demand the show gets cancelled, stop being a baby and realize that people have jobs and aren’t as privileged to have everything handed to them, they work, and you’re taking away the work from them. It’s as simple as that. Yes, I get you’re upset about Lexa but please look at the bigger picture. So next time I hear someone trying to boycott The 100, you better be ready for me setting a fire in your ass.

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I’m sure we all know how tricky time management and productivity can be, and also how crucial it is to be good at it, to succeed. So, I’d like to share a strategy of effectively managing all of those tasks you have at hand! 

Introducing Dwight Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States. He lived a super productive life, and during his presidency he implemented many transformational programs including NASA and the Atomic Energy act. Before then, he was a 5 star general in the US army, serving as the supreme commander, he was also the president of Columbia University… I could go on. 

My point is, he did all of this while still having time for personal interests and hobbies like painting and golfing. He was amazing at time management, and his most famous method of handling tasks, is called the Eisenhower Matrix

It’s a method of prioritising and sorting out your to-dos based on urgency and importance.  

It is super helpful is making us question what is important and actually necessary to do. I think that we often fill up our time with tasks that do not help us in reaching our core goals, and this method helps us narrow down our todos, saving us from wasting time, energy, and resources.

The 2nd and 3rd quadrant (not urgent important, urgent-not important) is what really minimises our productivity, if not properly managed and scheduled

I personally think its a fairly good way of understanding all that you have to do, what you should do first, and how you can deal with the rest. You don’t have to necessarily plan everything out this way, but its a good mindset to adopt when managing your workload. 

I’m so so awful at being concise (I’m so sorry for the long post!!) But I help this has helped you guys. Hopefully I’m going to post a printable of the matrix in the near future, so keep an eye out for that :)

What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important.
-Dwight Eisenhower

re: artists working themselves to death and why the HECK is this the standard

the entire thing about the death of an animator in japan due to overwork is exactly why i am completing chapter 1 of 1989nk in months, not weeks.

this has been one of my biggest fears getting this project off the ground. the standard for work output by artists is set so fucking high nowadays. we’re ALL expected to perform at the level of the outlier. (This was apparent to me as early as in Art School, when we were all treated like we were absolutely fucking useless for not being able to do an entire 5 minute 3D animated film all by ourselves like that one guy in our program.) Artists who overwork themselves and overachieve (whether by perceived necessity or choice) unfortunately create an illusion to consumers and employers that their level of performance should be the standard. It creates a nasty cycle, because more artists start trying to adhere to that standard and it gets passed on and on and on.

i’m honestly fully expecting my deadline for chapter one to be too long of a wait for some people. “This other artist got their 30-40 page comic done in 6-8 weeks, why is yours going to take 6-8 months?”

listen, its because i don’t want to not be able to draw for the rest of my life at 30. I dont want to destroy my wrist and make myself ill and make the quality of the comic suffer because i have to live up to the vicious overwork cycle that’s completely blanketed the digital art/media/comics scene. If another artist takes only a few weeks to do their comic? Fine, but you know, theyre most likely suffering BADLY for it, and even THEY shouldn’t have to do that. They really, really shouldn’t. Overwork and over achievement frankly needs to stop being praised and heralded, because its not only extremely damaging to the artist themselves, but it also creates that cycle i mentioned.

Trying to keep up with the immense production quantity and speed that other artists seem to be doing has never, ever been possible for me and I’ve occasionally tried, only to seriously break myself. Even the amount of work I do is considered a lot by some, so then how is it that to me, it always feels like chicken scratch? It feels like i’m STILL not doing enough, ever. Even with the amount of work I do, I still feel like a lazy sack of shit and feel crippling guilt when I’m taking a break to do anything else but draw. I constantly feel like I’m losing the race. That isn’t right. That isn’t fair.

i just really, really hope that people don’t see my production time for 1989nk and go “that’s too long, artists don’t take THAT long to do work” because. well. honestly, they should.

So I just saw someone say you shouldn’t tell an author if there was something in their fic that didn’t make sense to you because that’s the way the author wants and it’s like,

That’s not really how it works.

It’s next to impossible to get a beta. It’s even more impossible to get a beta who is above or at your level and is willing to actually help you rewrite things instead of just saying ‘yeah that looks good! You just missed a comma here!’ So authors aren’t necessarily posting things as-is because that’s how they want it, but because when you read your own story fifteen times you just begin to fail to see the errors. Authors also tend to forget they know things the audience doesn’t and leave out things they should have included, and the same for authors who feel they have to overexplain.

I mean if you’re just writing for funsies and because you have two minutes to rub together, by all means. Say you don’t really want anything remarked on. But if you plan to be a writer or plan on continuing to write in general, any criticism is very rare and ignoring it isn’t going to teach you anything.

how to get into skincare

I’ve already done a post about how to get into makeup, and one about how to get into SFX, so I figured I might as well make one for skincare. I have extremely sensitive, extremely acne-prone skin, so when it comes to skincare products, I’ve literally tried everything. It’s gotten to the point where I’m the “resident expert” that all of my family and friends come to when they need help figuring out which products to use.

I think a lot of people don’t take proper care of their skin because they have the misconception that it’s time-consuming and/or expensive. Honestly, I spend less than two minutes on skincare on most days, and I only use affordable products that are available at drug stores. No matter who you are, you can afford to take good care of your skin.


product names you’re likely to see, and what they mean:

  • cleanser is just soap that’s gentle enough for the delicate skin on your face. It comes in liquid, cream, and even powder formulas, but all you need to know is that if the label says “cleanser,” then it’s just face wash. If you’re only going to use one skincare product, this is the one you should invest in.
  • Note: You should NEVER use bar soap on your face! The skin on your face is thinner and more delicate than the skin on the rest of your body, and most bar soaps will damage it. There are some cleansers that come in bar form, but as a general rule you should never use a product on your face that wasn’t made specifically to be used on faces. 
  • moisturizer is probably the second most commonly-used product, after cleanser. This is exactly what it sounds like – it’s basically lotion that is specially made to be used on your face. No matter what your skin type is, you should be moisturizing daily. (Proper moisturization actually helps cut down on oily skin in most cases.) 
  • toner (sometimes also called astringent) is a product that is usually applied after cleanser, but before moisturizer. It’s called “toner” because it tones your skin, as well as cleansing any dirt or grime that your cleanser missed. Not everyone needs to use toner, but if you have oily or acne-prone skin, I’d recommend it.
  • a face mask is any product that is made to be used occasionally to give your skin a little extra love. A lot of them are made to address certain issues, like acne, dryness, or dullness. Usually, you apply it and let it sit on your face for a few minutes before you wash it off. I personally try to use a mask on my face once or twice a week whenever I have the time, but they’re more of a treat than a necessity. (And you probably shouldn’t use them every day.) 
  • exfoliators or exfoliating scrubs are products designed to buff away dead skin cells. Usually, they have some kind of gritty texture to them (like sugar grains) that scrubs off the dead skin. Like face masks, they’re more of a treat than a necessity, but unlike with face masks, too much exfoliating can actually hurt your skin. You should never exfoliate more than 2-3 times a week, and never, ever exfoliate two days in a row.
  • pore strips are kind of like waxing strips for your face, but instead of removing hair, they remove blackheads and other junk clogging your pores. I would not recommend pore strips to someone who is new to skincare, and like with exfoliators, using them too often can really damage your skin. If you’re going to use them, you should never use them more than once every three days. 

There are other product names that you might see floating around online (like “essence” or “facial oil”), but these are the basic products that you need to know about. Honestly, if you have a good cleanser, toner, and moisturizer (plus maybe a face mask or two for occasional pampering), then you don’t really need any other products, because those three will get the job done. 


how to build your own skincare routine:

  1. The first step is to understand your skin type. The three most common types are: dry, oily, and combination (in between dry and oily). Shop for products that are designed and labelled for your skin type. (If you have a lot of acne, look for products labelled “acne care” or something along those lines. If you have a lot of skin allergies, or if your skin doesn’t react well to harsh chemicals, look for products made for sensitive skin.)
  2. Go to the nearest Walmart, CVS, Walgreen’s, ect. with $20, and find the skincare aisle. Keeping your skin type in mind, look for a good cleanser and a good moisturizer. (If you have oily or acne-prone skin, you might want to pick up a toner as well.) If you can, look for generic brands (I know Walmart carries one called Equate) that make products with the same ingredients as name-brand products, but significantly cheaper. (If you’re looking for cruelty-free products, check out the brands Burt’s Bees and Yes To.)
  3. If you want to make things easier, you can buy all of the products you need in a pack. (Like this, or this.) These usually contain a cleanser, a toner, and a moisturizer. 
  4. Every morning when you first wake up, wash your face with the cleanser and pat it dry with a clean towel. Then apply the toner, if you bought one – you do not wash this off. Then (after waiting a few seconds for the toner to take effect), apply your moisturizer. That’s literally all there is to it. If you’re a morning shower person, you can save time by washing your face in the shower, then applying toner and moisturizer after you get out.
  5. Every night before you go to bed, do the same thing. (Of course, if you wear makeup, you’ll have to remove it, either with makeup remover or with warm water, before you wash your face.) 
  6. Right before bed is a good time to use face masks/exfoliators/pore strips, if you want. I always wash my face first, then skip over my toner and go straight into applying the mask/exfoliator/strip, and let it sit for as long as the directions on the packaging indicate. After I wash it off, I use my moisturizer like always.
  7. Congratulations! You now have a skincare routine!


This post goes into detail of all the products and tricks I use in my own personal routine, if you’re curious. 

I hope this post was helpful! If you have any questions about specific products, or about treating specific skin conditions, feel free to message me and I’ll try to help in any way I can. 

masterlist (there’s more beauty/skincare tips on there, if you’re interested)

A 5-Step Guide to Writing Intoductions

I get it, writing an introduction is friggin’ hard. Just as in real life, the first impressions you make in an essay are so important and basically the introduction will set the tone for everything that follows!

This is something we were discussing today in class and I thought a lot of it would be very useful so I decided to share it (#yourewelcome). Basically one of the assignments for our main class is to write an abstract which will essentially be the introduction to our dissertations. We were told what sort of format it should take and just reading through the different points it should cover, I thought it would make a very strong introduction for any topic!

Basically, we were told that writing is like a funnel - you should start with the broadest idea and get more specific throughout your work. So, an ideal introduction should be quite broad - but it should also highlight some of the specific things you’re going to write about in your essay.

~~~

So here are the 5 steps as promised:

  1. Opening premise - this should be a broad statement that is difficult to disagree with. We were given the example of ‘Intertextuality is central to the production and reception of translations.’ Can’t really disagree with that now, huh. (That’s written by Lawrence Venuti, btw - the rest of this is further down the post).
  2. Problematic - what problems arise from that opening statement? What are the main issues in the field? Have there been any recent (relevant!) developments?
  3. Research questions/purpose - what questions are you hoping to answer? What is the purpose of your essay/work? This is where the general ‘In this essay I’m going to…’ phrase comes in - this should be a statement of specific purpose that also demonstrates how relevant your main argument is in relation to the field mentioned in 1. Although please don’t actually say ‘In this essay I’m going to’. Please???
  4. Method - how are you going to answer those questions? Are you going to look at a particular example or case?
  5. References - this overlaps with number 4 a little. Basically, are there any particular texts, authors or works that you’re going to be referring to?

The basic way of wording all this, however, is what > why > how. Simple as that. 4-5 can blend together and they are less important depending on your level in the education system. These two points though can just be something as simple as the book that you’re going to discuss in a literature essay for English class.

~~~

Here’s the rest of the Venuti text, so you can (hopefully!) see these steps more clearly:

Intertextuality is central to the production and reception of translations. Yet the possibility of translating most foreign intertexts with any completeness or precision is so limited as to be virtually nonexistent. As a result, they are usually replaced by analogous but ultimately different intertextual relations in the receiving language. The creation of a receiving intertext permits a translation to be read with comprehension by translating-language readers. It also results in a disjunction between the foreign and translated texts, a proliferation of linguistic and cultural differences that are at once interpretive and interrogative. Intertextuality enables and complicates translation, preventing it from being an untroubled communication and opening the translated text to interpretive possibilities that vary with cultural constituencies in the receiving situation. To activate these possibilities and at the same time improve the study and practice of translation, we must work to theorize the relative autonomy of the translated text and increase the self-consciousness of translators and readers of translations alike.

To explore these ideas, I will discuss three cases: Rossella Bernascone’s 1989 Italian version of David Mamet’s play Sexual Perversity in Chicago; Kate Soper’s 1976 English version of Sebastiano Timpanaro’s study, Il lapsus freudiano. Psicanalisi e critica testuale (The Freudian Slip); and my own 2004 English version of Melissa P.’s fictionalized memoir, 100 colpi di spazzola prima di andare a dormire (100 Strokes of the Brush before Bed). The discussion makes use of a number of theorists, notably Ezra Pound and Philip Lewis.

~~~

Other pro tips:

  • Sometimes it can be useful to write an introduction when you have finished writing the main bulk of the essay - that way when you say ‘I’m going to write about xyz..’ you know for a fact that you’ve actually written about said things.
  • Your introduction should somehow match with your conclusion. Copy & paste these into a separate document from the rest of your essay and compare/contrast the both. Make changes as necessary
  • Sometimes you have an original thought in the conclusion of an essay - put that in your introduction!

~~~

I hope this helps at least one person out there! And, as per, my ask box is always open for questions/suggestions!

Official Dad Review of: Sign of the Times

I told my dad nothing. About Matt, about my interpretation and the general interpretation of the song. A little known fact about my dad is that he’s very musically gifted (piano, guitar, trumpet, everything) but he hides it. Still, he knows music and understands it very deeply.

These are copied and pasted texts I got from him.

“1. I’ve listened to it twice now and I can totally play the whole song. That’s not to say that the song is bad, it’s just very simple… he’s not really stretching himself musically… or should I say as a musician.”

“2. It is produced very very well! Meaning the production value is awesome!!! Top notch studio work!!! Absolutely top notch. His voice is absolutely amazing and he is undoubtedly feeling every word he is singing! The kid can sing!”

“3. If you have ever heard “Major Tom” by David Bowie it has that type of vibe to it… I’m going to listen to them side by side because I’m not convinced it’s not the same bridge yet. At one point I tried to sing in my head ground control to major Tom, and it fit!“

“4. I feel like he is EXTREMELY committed to a friend who passed and was deeply emotional about the ending of the relationship….
He he is using a technique called vamping where he uses the same lyrics over and over to express his sadness. So for that reason I think it feels like raw emotion coming through, which is a beautiful thing…
What are the bullets about? Is it a metaphor? Did his friend kill himself?”

[At which point I told him about Matt]

“I knew it. I got that from the song.
You can’t bribe the door was a very powerful lyric! It made me think that the guy killed himself.”

“From a musician standpoint it’s not too difficult to learn.
In terms of what they did to this very simple melody in the studio it was amazing!”

“In terms of emotional content and the artistry that Harry has it was outstanding”

Overall be gives it an 8/10 and is incredibly intrigued and excited for the rest of the album.

nuclearmentality  asked:

I know you can't tell us if/when Infinity Train gets greenlit (I, for one, am hoping it does!), but I wanted to know how hard it was, overall, to make the pilot, and whether you think you'd be capable of running a full show.

It’s hard to say how difficult it was. Kinda difficult? It was the exact amount of work I expected it to be. I feel like “hard” or “easy” is sort of a relative term that often shows that something was more or less work than expected rather than objective difficulty. I planned things out as much as I could and tried to be easy to work with. I tried have a looser hand in some areas and stronger in others. Part of running a show is being able to give up certain aspects of the art of making a show to other people. So while I was allowed to do as much as I wanted, I intentionally tried to limit myself so I could practice.

Like for example, I was interested in doing the music, but I also knew that if I got my own show I wouldn’t be able to do that as it’s too much extra work. So I got Chrome Canyon, who I trust a ton, and sort of used this as practice in learning how to talk about music with someone. Talking about music can be difficult and it’s not something I have a lot of experience in, even though I make a lot of music myself.

The shorts crew is also very experienced, so even though I’m told my process went pretty smoothly, whenever I DID hit a bump they all knew what to do and had my back the whole time. They were super supportive. The shorts program is sort of there to help you learn about all the bits and pieces that go into a show and see how you handle them.

So for another example, something new I hadn’t done before is attend a breakdown of my episode. Breakdowns are where the art director and the production team sit and figure out every asset that needs to be made for an episode. This means they end up paging through the entire storyboard, panel by panel, and find every:

- new background

- new prop (anything a character interacts with like if they pick up a spoon or adjust a rear view mirror etc)

- new special effect (like a glint on a sword or an explosion)

- special poses (if a character makes a really weird reaction face someone has to design it)

- special colors (if a character changes to a different scene they might need new colors or rim light designs).

- every reused background/character/prop

- Just in general go over design notes

I’ve had experience doing all aspects of production in my own work, and as a storyboarder on Regular Show JG had occasionally allowed me to take part in different aspects of production, but I had never seen a breakdown before. Now that I have, on my own board no less, I very much feel it should be a requirement for every storyboarder to attend one breakdown meeting in their career. Seeing other people try to decipher your work is very illuminating and instantly made me change the way I boarded and labeled things so I could be more clear in order to make their jobs easier. Like they always told me “add this background” or “label stuff” but you don’t really KNOW know until you see exactly what they’re looking at and swearing about in the room.

I absolutely think I’m capable of running a full show. It would be a learning curve, but so is any new job. Just about everything that I can think of that a show runner does is stuff that I really want to do. It sounds like a lot of fun and I’d love to give it a go.

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1.25.17 (19/100 days of productivity)

These are some of my Buddhism and Contemporary Readings notes. In my East Asian Buddhism class we had a Sri Lankan monk come and lecture for us today. At the end of class we meditated for twenty minutes. It was really cool, and it honestly felt great to clear my head. I’m not good at meditating on my own time, but when I have to do it for a class or as part of some collective activity I can make myself sit still. Maybe I should consider going to the meditation practices on campus. 

ORGANIZING YOUR GRIMOIRE (tips from a neat freak virgo)

okay i’ve been meaning to make this post for awhile bc i’ve seen some great ideas for grimoire organization, and i want to share the way i’m keeping track of all the pages in mine without worrying about the order in which i write them down

the trick: indexing. this is a technique lifted straight from bullet journaling. in fact, my grimoire has started to take form inside my regular bullet journal, so i’ve added a separate index page specifically for my witch-relevant content. this is cool because it’s like my grimoire is kind of hidden within a mundane exterior 👍🏻

here are the two steps:

1. number your pages as you go, and
2. add each page to your index as you write it

you could go further than this and add indices specifically for each type of content, like an index just for spell pages, an index for tarot pages, etc. - my preference is just to label each entry with a category so that they’re easier to skim. you can also add other signifiers like my asterisks to mark my own original content vs. information gathered from other sources. color coding would also work well here! and when you fill it up, you can either keep a couple pages at one place reserved for indexing, OR just start a new one on the next available page and enter it as the last line of your old index.

the reason i like this system is that it allows me to work in a fixed notebook where i can’t add pages (i really love notebooks), but frees me from my perfectionist fear of having information end up disorganized. it doesn’t bother me if pages on the same topic end up in different parts of the notebook because my index keeps them organized! i’m less likely to put off adding info until i know where it ‘should go’ so ultimately i end up being more productive, too.

i’m sure there are others who have similar setups but i thought some people might find this helpful 💕

Warning to any new naturals or those wanting to be natural

Go natural with the bare minimum of nessasary products! I cannot emphasize this enough. There are only four things I used when when I first went natural
1. Shampoo
2. Conditioner
3. Mosteriser/detangular (hair lotion)
4. Wide tooth comb

There were a couple of reasons for this one I’m a college student with a very very small budget, and two i did not want to fall into the trap of being a product/style junkie. The most important thing for natural hair is health and i found that hair doesn’t really need that much to be healthy. When first going natural it is best to start out simple and build from there because you don’t know how these products will work on your hair. Even now I’ve been natural for about 3 years and i only needed to add two things to my hair stack which is a deep conditioner and a cheep oil. Anyone just starting on their natural hair journey should limit themselves to no more than $30 on products.

I meant to post this on april fool’s day because my writing is a joke :) But I’m late, so here’s a joke posted on the wrong day.

Summary: Keith, who just happens to be coming down with a cold, is forced to wait out a thunderstorm with Lance.


“You’re still coming to pick me up, right?”

Lance’s voice is questioning, insecure, as if he doesn’t already know the answer. Keith sighs into the phone, before sniffling once, absently rubbing his nose on the back of his hand. “I thought we already went over this.”

“I know, but I called you and you weren’t picking up–”

“I was in class,” Keith retorts, pressing the phone to his ear with one hand as he slings his backpack over his shoulders with the other. He twists away briefly to cough into his shoulder. “The lecturer ended a little later than usual, that’s all.”

He can hear Lance’s hum of assent on the other end. “So, you are coming, then?”

“Yeah. Yeah, I am.” Keith pauses outside of the university building, scanning the parking lot for his motorbike, before he spots it parked in the far left corner. “Have you been waiting for a long time?”

“The meeting ended ten minutes ago,” Lance responds, “so, not really.”

“That’s good,” Keith unfastens his helmet from where it’s been clipped around the handlebars, then fits it over his head, brushing loose strands of hair from his eyes. “….I’m heading off. I‘m going to have to hang up now, okay?”

“Okay,” Lance pauses. “I’ll see you in twenty minutes?”

“Fifteen.” Keith fishes a keychain out of his pocket, pausing to find the right key before inserting it into the ignition. “See you there.”

The engine starts up, a low rumble of sound and motion, and Keith presses the end call button before sliding the phone back into his pocket. He sniffles, before straightening slightly, navigating the bike carefully out of the parking lot.

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30 Mar 2017

…well fuck.

Read the rest of the story HERE!!!


So, for those of you dying to know exactly how the shower went… XD
I know there are still clumps of hair on his scalp… but they fall off too. Jsut so no one is holding out hope.

Click the keep reading for a PSA addressing valid concerns regarding Nino’s “prank”…

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Helpful tips and (free) apps for mobile devices that will help you in school and homework

Since we keep our phones and other devices on us at basically all times, they’re really accessible and useful. When it comes to school, though, these devices can become rather distracting. Sometimes in order to focus, you need to leave it in a different room! But if used correctly, your phone can actually help you do schoolwork.

Here, my friend, is a post about using your phone to help you study and do schoolwork.

Just remember that everyone works differently and focuses differently, so experiment! Try out these tips. Alter them. Try doing some and not others. See what works for you!

  1. Forest (app): This is an app that helps you focus; a tree is planted, and you set a timer. At the end of that timer, the tree has finished growing. If you use any other apps, the tree will wither and die. You can set a white list of apps that you deem productive; the app will allow these apps to be used during the focus time. At the end of each day, you have a forest of trees; it may be full of green trees, or withered trees.
    1. Use the whitelist! If music helps you focus, whitelist your music app. whitelist any homework/working apps on this list you want to use during your focus time. Whitelist your calculator. Just go through the list of apps and whitelist any that you will need.
    2. Don’t whitelist things you DON’T need. Remember the purpose of the app: to stay focused on SCHOOLWORK. Don’t whitelist things that will distract you.
  2. MyHomework (app): This app is incredibly useful. You put your scheduled classes into the app (there are tons of options for the class times; block schedules, period schedules, weekly or biweekly schedules, etc), then you add assignments, tests, homework, etc. It’s basically a virtual planner. It allows you to include priority level. Then when you go to see what assignments you have, you can sort it by priority, due date, class, or assignment type. It will give you alerts too.
    1. Widgets are miracles. This app has a widget for classes and for homework. It lets you see quickly what classes you have today, and what homework is due today, on your phone’s home screen.
    2. Get it on all your devices. It’s on everything. Kindle, Chrome OS, Android, IPhone, Mac, Windows… I don’t know about linux. 
  3. Cram (app): Basically, this app lets you make sets of flashcards virtually. It’s much easier than making paper flashcards, and it comes with you everywhere, so you can practice at any time. It comes with study programs, giving you easy ways to learn the subject fast. It also has a text-to-speech feature, and you can set one side to one language and one side to another language to help you with the pronunciation of words. It is the best form of flashcards I’ve ever used. 
  4. Duolingo (app): This is an app designed to help you learn a language like you would naturally: through a kind of submersion. It gives you little phrases and makes you translate them. When a new word is introduced, it is underlined and you may click it to see it’s definition, so you aren’t completely blind here. It also makes you do pronunciation, match words with definitions, and it has a few other activities. It doesn’t really give you lessons, it gives you practice. It has tons of languages, and it’s even going to introduce Klingon soon. One cool feature is the feedback: each language has admins, and when you don’t understand a sentence, you can ask about it in the comments. Another student, or an admin, may respond to your question with an answer.
    1. Use the desktop version when possible. The desktop version gives you access to actual basic lessons, and goes a bit more in-depth. The little sessons on the mobile phone are certainly helpful, and you will learn, but the desktop version is a bit more educational and even offers flashcards… Which the mobile version does not.
    2. It isn’t perfect. It isn’t good at grading your pronunciation, and sometimes a sentence can have two meanings, but it only accepts one. Luckily, you can always flag a question with a wrong answer, so it will be corrected by an admin. It’s a nice system.
    3. Practice daily! This app records your streaks, so you can keep track of how much you’re studying. An interesting feature in this app is fluency. If you stop practicing, your fluency number goes down. It keeps track of how well you’re doing in the lessons to track your fluency growth.
    4. Redo lessons. One interesting feature in this app is the way it makes you redo the lessons. Over time, the “strength” of each lesson goes down. You need to redo lessons for the strength to go up. This is to stop you from forgetting what you’ve learned.
  5. RescueTime (app): RescueTime is an app and desktop application. It goes on all your devices and records what you’re doing. Sounds creepy, but all it’s doing is telling you what you’re doing, and giving you a score on how productive you’re being. You mark some applications as being productive, some as neutral, some as distracting, etc, then it keeps you aware of what you’re doing too much of and what you aren’t doing enough of.
    1. Get it on EVERYTHING. For a while I only had it on my desktop, but then I found I was doing productive things on my chromebook and mobile too and I wanted those to be counted. I found that it inspired me to be much more productive with my time. On the bus, instead of playing a game on my phone, why not up my productivity with Cram? Seriously, it really makes you more productive. Get it on your phone, laptop, desktop, browser, whatever. Get it everywhere. And update to Premium if you can, it gives you a more detailed report.

Here are a few more tips for your phone in general:

Organise your apps into folders. For example, here is my homepage:

See the folders? I keep them color coded. The red folders are distracting: Social Media, Entertainment, Games. The Green ones are productive! The white and yellow are neutral.

Get widgets. They’re good at giving you quick information without having to open the app.

Experiment. Remember, everyone learns and focuses differently! Use your phone to your advantage.

Also, these are the apps that I use. There are so many other good apps. I’ve heard really good things about Memrise, a free app for learning languages that focuses on vocabulary. If didn’t include it in the main list because I’ve never used it and I don’t know much about it, but if you’re learning a language you should go check it out! I know I’m going to soon.

If you have tips or apps to add, please do!

A Place To Call Home pt 7

PART ONE | PART TWO | PART THREE | PART FOUR | PART FIVE | PART SIX

Pairing: Dylan O'Brien x Reader

Wordcount: 4,906

Warnings: Fluff with some smut ;), language

A/N: I am so sorry this took so long to get up, I was having some major writers block but I think I’m clear of it so the next part shouldn’t take as long. I have to thank @writing-obrien and @bows-and-glitterz for reading it over for me! I hope you guys like it! 

Originally posted by hopeless-hugger

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