i read kids books

Whenever I feel sad I think of all those little kids that read Rick Riordan’s books and are able to find themselves in those characters and I think of all those little kids that will grow up with this amazing range of diversity in their favorite book characters, in their heroes, and I feel a little more hope for the future.

“There were early signs. I used to have this feeling that I could manipulate the future. I got lucky at casinos, and I thought it was because I had the power to control events. I was a biology teacher back then. I was married with four kids. I read three books per week. I was only getting a few hours of sleep every night. Then one morning on the bus I had a break from reality. I was speaking to a friend, and I started to understand her in a completely different way. And the things I understood were evil. It was like my entire mental structure had changed. I began to frighten people. I lost all filters. I would say all of the strange things that I was thinking. People thought I was on drugs. I lost my job. My wife went to her mother’s place with the kids. I ended up sleeping on the streets. It took me years to realize I had schizophrenia. I was put in a psychiatric ward for two months. Now I’m taking three different medications. I’m reading books again. I’ve got some self-esteem back. I’m building a relationship with my kids. But I’m still fighting it. It’s always there. It doesn’t come and go. It’s a continuous way of looking at the world that I must keep pushing back against.”

(Cordoba, Argentina)

10 Books to read this autumn & Halloween🍁🍂🍁

1.The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge

It’s spooky,  it’s smart, thematic and has splashes of the otherworldly but it’s mostly a historical mystery

Originally posted by gertieparr

2. Tangleweed and Brine by Deirdre Sullivan

This is a collection of twelve fairytale retelling it’s Witchy, subversive and lyrical, it’s a bit dark but not to bad, it’s an ideal autumn read.

Originally posted by aningeniousuniverse

3. The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter by Theodora Goss 

This is a retelling inspired from the classic horror stories of: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Sherlock Holmes, Van Helsing, Dracula (Mr. Renfield,) Frankenstein, Rappaccini’s daughter, and Dr. Moreau.  it’s a very Interesting read if you love the Classics and a perfect read for Halloween.

Originally posted by myfinalwords

4. The Accident Season by Moïra Fowley-Doyle

This is a ideal book for reading and re-reading every autumn, Come October, seventeen-year-old Cara and her family – including her mother, older sister and ex-stepbrother – board up the windows and hide the sharp implements in preparation for the Accident Season, a month in which mysterious and dangerous things seem to constantly befall them. A spellbinding magical realism standalone, it’s full of tarot cards, masquerade balls, fortune-telling, dreams, hallucinations and hazy, stylish prose. If you’re looking for an atmospheric autumnal read, this is absolutely the book to go for. 

Originally posted by night-young


5.Harry potter by jk Rowling

Let’s face it you can’t have Halloween with out harry potter, with it’s wizards and witch’s, it’s magic spells and potions, it’s monsters and just overall feeling of autumn in this series it’s a must read.

Originally posted by gorunwithsissors


6. Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens

The Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries are one of those series you know is relatively recent but which seems like it’s been around for ages. It has that classic but accessible touch which makes it appealing to kids and brings something older readers or adults can appreciate, too. 

Originally posted by xbunnyclawsx

7. All the Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater.

Here is a thing everyone wants:
a miracle; here is a thing everyone fears:
what it takes to get one.Enchanting writing and complex characters interwoven into a tale of love, darkness, fear and redemption.

Originally posted by ullathynell

8. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

Why so perfect for fall? The emphasis on education makes this feel especially appropriate to read during back-to-school season.
This turn of the century coming-of-age story is an American classic for good reason. The beautifully crafted tale pulls you into Francie’s story and has you rooting for her as she grows up in challenging circumstances. There is an undercurrent of hope that buoys everything

Originally posted by spacefairytales


9. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

One of Agatha Christie most famous mysteries, the eerie setting, and countdown of survivors makes for a satisfying mystery with a slightly Halloween-inspired feel. Add in the narrative following the children’s verse, and the disappearing soldiers mimicking the fallen guests and there is a decided sense of menace to the text.

Originally posted by myfavoritecartoons


10. The Halloween Tree by Ray Bradbury

This is a fast-moving, eerie…tale set on Halloween nigh. Eight costumed boys running to meet their friend Pipkin at the haunted house outside town encounter instead the huge and cadaverous Mr. Moundshroud. As Pipkin scrambles to join them, he is swept away by a dark Something, and Moundshroud leads the boys on the tail of adventures. This book is actually for kids but I read it last year at the age of 18 and I loved it and learned a lot about Halloweens history.
(Also I loved the movie as a kid)

Originally posted by kyecheng


Bonus

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

It’s an ideal choice when you’re looking for something to read while curled up under a blanket, sipping a hot drink. From the famous opening line to the dramatic conclusion, Rebecca is also perfect for a discussion title, if you’re looking for one for your book club to read this fall. The atmospheric novel is a modern classic, blending Gothic romance and mystery.

9

su characters but theyre from that shitty fairy book series i read as a kid

8

Ezra Miller as Sirius Black is, and forever will be, my favorite Harry Potter fan cast.

CAN YOU SEE IT?!

it’s been two years since the lynburn legacy ended and i’m still disappointed that the ya lit fandom never fell head over heels in love with it.

do you want a clever, mystery-solving protagonist? do you want a chubby protagonist? do you want a protagonist with japanese heritage who doesn’t shy from pointing out the racism her family receives in england? do you want cute boys? do you want cute girls? do you want to read the word ‘bisexual’ with your very own eyeballs? do you want your heroine to have a snarky lesbian sidekick? do you want a touch of humour with your angst? do you want ya where parents are actually present? do you want books that stress the importance of found families? do you want books that will make you laugh and cry and cheer?

read the lynburn legacy

toys are weapons, weapons are toys

Actually reading the book right now (muttering “No, Kevin” on every other page). He keeps haunting me aah
Art blog: questionartbox

What if Prompto is just a normal kid, trying to get a degree at his local city college while holding down a part-time job so he can save up for his own apartment, but every time he closes his eyes he dreams of Insomnia? It’s like one of those long, continuous dreams that people talk about having, but this one doesn’t ever pick up where it leaves off. The dream keeps going during the hours he spends living his normal life and then, after he turns off the light and climbs into bed, he blinks into awareness in a car speeding through the Leiden landscape and an entire day’s worth of memories come flowing into his head all at once. Sometimes he dozes off in the middle of the world’s most boring history lecture, and suddenly finds himself in the middle of a battle, his arm bracing against the recoil of a gun he doesn’t remember firing, a large body shoving him out of the way of an attack as he hesitates, brain struggling to catch up.

The first time he sees Noctis in real life, slumped fast asleep over the edge of a biology lab table, he nearly faints. Prompto isn’t sure how a character from his dreams can exist in the real world, but it doesn’t stop him from taking the seat next to the other boy and striking up a conversation when he finally wakes up. After all, there’s nothing to be anxious about. Prompto already knows that he and Noctis will be friends.

Doctors don’t know what to make of his dreams. As far as they know, aside from a bit of anxiety, there is nothing wrong with Prompto. Neurologists and therapists and medication can’t find a way to stop the dreams from coming, and after a time, Prompto isn’t sure that he wants them to. The dream world may be full of sacrifice and violence and loss, but it is also full of friendship and hope and… love.

Prompto dreams of a man with pale green eyes and a soft smile that makes his heart flutter whenever he is graced with it. A man so selfless and intelligent and passionate and kind that the Prompto in his dreams falls in love quickly and hopelessly. Prompto spends years of dreams memorizing the curve of Ignis’ lips, the pattern of the birthmarks that dot their way across the right side of his face, the way his fingers feel as they drag roughly through his hair when they kiss. He wakes in the morning, disoriented and lonely, reaching across the bed for a man who won’t be there.

On the day of Prompto’s 25th birthday, ten years after first meeting Ignis in his dreams, Prompto catches sight of him stepping briskly through the station away from a departing train. And though the doors are closing and Noctis has already claimed their seats, Prompto can’t stop himself from pushing his way back onto the platform, dodging commuters and tourists as best he can while he tears through the crowded station after him.

Prompto calls out his name and Ignis turns.

His eyes, wide and confused behind the rim of his tasteful glasses, are undamaged.

But they are also without recognition.

Ignis, the man he has spent the past ten years of his life falling head over heels in love with, has no idea who he is.

HAVE YOU GUYS HEARD ABOUT “MEDDLING KIDS”?

If you like the Scooby-Doo-type story of four kids and a dog solving spooky mysteries involving monsters and ghosts, perhaps you’ll get a kick out of “Meddling Kids”, the new upcoming novel by Edgar Cantero! 

Synopsis: 

It was all over the papers. “Teenage Sleuths Unmask Sleepy Lake Monster.” In the picture the gang (two boys, two girls, and their loveable weimaraner) pose before the old Deboen Mansion on Sleepy Lake in Blyton Hills, OR. All smiles, freckles, and bell-bottoms, they surround a hogtied Mr. Wickley in his salamander costume, his far-fetched criminal scheme foiled. “And I would have gotten away with it too, if it weren’t for you meddling kids.”

Flash forward. That glorious summer is long gone. And thirteen years of winter have followed. The gang’s grown apart. Adult life hasn’t been kind. One of the boys was institutionalized. The other killed himself. And Andy, their intrepid leader, is growing tired of not facing her demons. Too many things were left unspoken that summer. Not only her feelings for Kerri, the brains of the operation — there are also the relentless nightmares, drawing her back to that notorious night at the mansion.

In MEDDLING KIDS, it’s time to reopen the case, reunite what’s left of the gang, and return to Sleepy Lake. And this time, whether it’s petty villainy or an aeons-old primordial evil, the Blyton Hills Summer Detective Club will once and for all confront their fears face to face.


Separate Synopsis:

The teen detectives once known as the Blyton Summer Detective Club (of Blyton Hills, a small mining town in the Zoinx River Valley in Oregon) are all grown up and haven’t seen each other since their fateful, final case in 1977. Andy, the tomboy, is twenty-five and on the run, wanted in at least two states. Kerri, one-time kid genius and budding biologist, is bartending in New York, working on a serious drinking problem. At least she’s got Tim, an excitable Weimaraner descended from the original canine member of the team. Nate, the horror nerd, has spent the last thirteen years in and out of mental health institutions, and currently resides in an asylum in Arhkam, Massachusetts. The only friend he still sees is Peter, the handsome jock turned movie star. The problem is, Peter’s been dead for years.

The time has come to uncover the source of their nightmares and return to where it all began in 1977. This time, it better not be a man in a mask. The real monsters are waiting.

With raucous humor and brilliantly orchestrated mayhem, Edgar Cantero’s Meddling Kids taps into our shared nostalgia for the books and cartoons we grew up with, and delivers an exuberant, eclectic, and highly entertaining celebration of horror, life, friendship, and many-tentacled, interdimensional demon spawn.

I’m personally very excited to see what kind of commentary this book has to offer! I will definitely be getting a copy for myself!

This book will be released on July 11, 2017 and if you are interested in reading, you can purchase it as a hardcover or in Kindle format on Amazon! Here is the link if you would like to pre-order it: https://www.amazon.com/Meddling-Kids-Novel-Edgar-Cantero-ebook/dp/B01M3WPB83

Whomped up this pedigree chart for my friend who’s reading TWoK for the first time and couldn’t remember who was who in Chapter 12. Tried to keep it simple - I have so much more to say about the Kholins.

In my low periods, I wondered what was the point of creating art. For whom? Are we animating God? Are we talking to ourselves? And what was the ultimate goal? To have one’s work caged in art’s great zoos- the Modern, the Met, the Louvre?
I craved honesty, yet found dishonesty in myself. Why commit to art? For self-realization, or for itself? It seemed indulgent to add to the glut unless one offered illumination.
Often I’d sit and try to write or draw, but all of the manic activity in the streets, coupled with the Vietnam War, made my efforts seem meaningless. I could not identify with political movements. In trying to join them I felt overwhelmed by yet another form of bureaucracy. I wondered if anything I did mattered.
Robert had little patience with these introspective bouts of mine. He never seemed to question his artistic drives, and by his example, I understood that what matters is the work: the string of words propelled by God becoming a poem, a weave of colour and graphite scrawled upon the sheet that magnifies His motion. To achieve within the work a perfect balance of faith and execution. From this state of mind comes a light, life-charged.
—  Patti Smith, Just Kids