i need more practice with drawing

What constellations do you see? 🌌 I’m selling prints of this on my Society6 store!!✨
Portrait of my original character Ceres, counterpart of Celeste ✨💙 I’m happy with the result but I need more practice on coloring dark skin tones 💖

http://society6.com/serafleur
http://patreon.com/serafleur
http://instagram.com/serafleur.art

Because I’ve basically been told to upload this. I needed to prepare tho. :’D My Sh//eith shipper soul is crying somewhere in the corner. But what you don’t do for special people.

ice ice paladin‧₊˚

3

What? No hugs and tears for an old friend? Not like i’d expect it though.
If you’d shouted “Fang!” and hugged me i mighta had a heart attack on the spot.
But i’m glad to see you’re still the same.It’s been a long time,after all…

Here is 10 things I tell my students on the first day of class about building yourself up into being a artist. This is starting point, not a all encompassing list. Hope you find it helpful!

1. Never stop experimenting. When you stop trying new things your style will get stagnant. Developing your style never has an stopping point, you’re going to continue learning and changing–that is a good thing.

2. Don’t draw to please a particular person or audience. It is tempting to draw something you think the person viewing it will like. It starts with drawing to please a friend/family member, then a teacher, and then a wider audience online or in person. However, consider drawing to please yourself first, an audience will follow in time and you will face a lot less burn out down the line. You’ll be hired for this, work you made out of something you liked crafting–not something you forced yourself to craft. Don’t make art that makes you miserable.

3. Learn the basics. Get good at anatomy (human and animal), perspective, creating depth, lighting, etc–then break the rules you’ve learned. Work, no matter how abstract, pushed, and pulled is always stronger when informed by a mastery of the basics.

4. Practice working in ways that do not hurt your hand. Learn to draw with a relaxed hand and draw in long strokes. Both of these methods help prevent issues with your hand, wrist, and arm. I’ve never gotten carpal tunnel, and I draw on a daily basis, because I have learned how to treat my hand well. Your hand is your tool, if you wear it out there isn’t a new one you can just pick up. The best treatment for any possible physical issues is prevention.

5. Learn how to draw without erasing. It is scary and it is tough no doubt! However the best way to become more confident is through not erasing. There is a medium for everyone to try this out, whether it is pen or non-erasing colored pencils. If you want to ease yourself into this method try out Pentel red lead, it erases a bit–but overall will always leave a mark with every stroke you make. The importance of this is learning to not be afraid of mistakes.

6. Draw from life, from reference photos, and from imagination. This trio is important, combining all three is usually how you build great drawing skills. Drawing from life gives you the ability to capture small details that you’ll remember to put in when drawing from a reference photo, drawing from refs will give you the practice you’ll need to handle whatever subject so that one day you can draw it from your own imagination–see how that works?

7. You’re art isn’t completely unique and that is okay. I can’t emphasis how many people I know who have gotten so hung up on being something totally unique that they burn out fast and never make work again. Now, considering how much art is in the world there is no way that what you create will be 100% unique to you. That is fine, your personality in your work is more of what makes something yours than a “style”.

8. Figure out your work’s personality. On that note finding the personality of your art is important as you go into trying to build your own place in the art world. The personality of a piece is a combination of style, subject, color, shapes, lines, and maybe most important themes (yes subject and themes are different). This combo is what makes your art special. At a loss for where to start figuring out your own personality? Compile a list of 10 artists you love. Why do you love them? Is it the shapes of one artist that speak to you, the line work of another is beautiful, the themes of a third make you feel inspired? Now take the 10 things you love about those 10 artists and start applying them to your own work. This isn’t about copying these artists, it is about the inspiration. That line work you love in another artist’s piece is gunna look different in yours for example. Those themes from another artist, well when you take them on your life might inform them in a opposite way. In time your inspired work will evolve into something that is your own.

9. Talent is nice, persistence is more important. Someone may be naturally talented in some areas of art, however someone who is persistent in their craft is so much more likely to succeed. Effort, continued growth, and practice will add up to so much more in the long run than just skating by on “talent”.

10. Be a good person. Treat others with respect, learn about social issues, don’t be a creep, and use your art to help people. And this might mean you craft a piece about an important issue that changes thousands of lives, or you might just be creating to help yourself get through the day. Both are important, after all you are a person too and you should always be trying to help and be kind to yourself.

How to make custom lace appliques – the “Frankenlace” method

A lot of people asked for more info on how I made the appliques that decorate the bottom of Zelda’s gown. Here’s my tutorial for the whole process! This method can be used to make all kinds of applique shapes and designs if you get creative with it.

  1. These lace appliques are made out of other lace – hence the nickname. To get started, you’ll need to collect a few lace trims to use as raw material. Look for styles that are similar or complement each other, because you’ll be combining them. This is some, but not all, of the trims I used. I bought these in the LA fabric district, but most are available at trimexpoonline.com.
  2. Cut your lace down into smaller pieces that are more modular. Don’t cut up ALL your lace – this is just an experimentation stage, to practice rearranging the design.
  3. Using a template of your desired shape (I made mine digitally, but you can hand draw one too) practice arranging your pieces until you find a design that suits your needs. This is not my final design in the picture – I went through several versions before I was totally happy with how it looked. You might discover that you need more lace, which is why planning and experimentation are so important. When you’re satisfied with how it looks, it’s time to start putting it all together.
  4. You’ll need an embroidery hoop large enough to cover your whole template, plus some netting that is as close to transparent as you can find. Most generic tulle is NOT fine enough to do well with this technique – the holes are too large and the tulle stretches too much when handled. Look for netting that does not stretch or fray, if possible. Put some netting in your embroidery hoop, tightening the surface like a drum. I taped my template to a small sheet of masonite to give myself a portable work surface. I also ended up using clamps to hold the embroidery hoop to the masonite, but forgot to get a picture. This is optional, but really helps the design from shifting too much as you work.
  5. Tools for the next step: fabric glue (other brands work too), a small paintbrush, and a water cup. I watered my glue down a little to make it easier to spread with the paintbrush. Be careful not to add TOO much water, or your glue will be too thin, not grip well, and take a long time to dry.
  6. Working in small sections, begin gluing your lace pieces onto the netting. Start at the center and work outward, if possible. Continue until all your lace pieces are glued onto the netting.
  7. Here’s what mine looked like with all the lace attached! At this point, I flipped the embroidery hoop over and applied a second coat of glue over the entire back of the work. The netting is so thin that you can continue to apply more glue from the backside to get a more secure grip.
  8. Optional: add rhinestones to taste. I used E6000 for this step. Not every applique requires rhinestones, but in this case I wanted Zelda to sparkle as much as possible.
  9. Repeat to create as many appliques as you need! Zelda has 8 along the bottom of her dress. Here’s part of my assembly line.
  10. When you’re ready to attach the applique to your fashion fabric, trim away some of the netting along the outside, but leave any “interior” portions that help stabilize the design. I simply glued my appliques onto the silk, but I later went back and hand-stitched them down for a more secure hold. After they are properly attached to your fabric, you can VERY CAREFULLY trim away the “interior” pockets of plain netting using small scissors.
  11. The final look of my gown, after all the appliques and trim were attached.

This method is very time consuming and requires a lot of patience and concentration – but I just love the results! I wanted to achieve the look of professionally-made applique, but without access to industrial equipment, this was the next best thing I could come up with. 

The white-on-white effect is subtle, but matches the look I was going for. Photo by Vontography.

I hope this is helpful to some of you in your own costume projects. Let me know if you have any questions, and good luck!

chasingthehero  asked:

Hi! I struggle a lot with drawing eyes, especially with shape and size :( but I love the way you draw them! Do you have any tips or tutorials???

Thank you!! well, eyes are a really particular thing in an artist style i think, and also something that can give a lot of expression and emotion to characters. I’m not really good at explaining my own drawing style, but i’ll try to give you a few tips that i use a lot to start drawing/sketching.

1) the size; i think face proportions play and important role here, starting to where to position eyes so they actually make sense. I start doing the circle and the crossed lines to make a mental map of the face

Also the cross makes easier to imagine the direction the character is looking at and so, where the eyes and the gaze is directed to, for example Pidge here may show us…

So, once you directed the face and positioned the eyes, you can start drawing on top, that’s a first step, so now you use what you’ve done to start the real thing and EXPERIMENTING!! 

2) the shape; here i can only say that it’ll depend on your liking and what kind of drawing style you’re after. In my case i like to make them inspired in real life eyes, but a little bigger and rounded, it dependes on the character tho, and the expression you’re trying to achieve: for that i usually play with how open or close is the eye and the final tip of the eye, which i lift, for example if it’s for a cat-like eye, make it more rounded, for example for kids or surprised expressions, or i draw it down, for sad or tired eyes.

The rest is to complement the eyes with the eyebrows (which is a strong game in my opinion) and well… go draw drAW DRAW!!

There and on is a lot of practice and observation, and eyes and expressions will come out naturally :) I’m also still learning all this so if you need any help you can check my ‘art-help’ tag, with tutorials and reference about drawing that i’ve been collecting. 

Hope this helps!! (◡‿◡✿)