i need comic book covers for all of them

anonymous asked:

Hello Madame! So I'm an art student in Graphic Design and a self-taught artist since more or less ten years, but I honestly learn way more things by myself than at art school so I still have one big problem. I can draw a lot of things but when it comes to poses I just... Draw always the same, easy ones, or I'm obligated to use references to draw something a bit different. It's killing me, because I want to leave my comfort zone and draw poses from my imagination alone. Any tips, tutorials ? <3

Hi anon ^^

First, I have to apologize because it’s gonna be a long post, consider it as my “DEFINITIVE REFERENCE PICTURE POST” :)

I’m obligated to use references to draw something a bit different.(…) I want to leave my comfort zone and draw poses from my imagination alone. Any tips, tutorials ? <3            

The first step is drawing all kind of poses under different angles using reference pictures. What? But…I don’t want to!! That’s why I’m contacting you P-M!!! WHAT THE HELL!!!

Calm down ^^

It’s necessary in order to build in your head a kind of “visual library” that will give you the possibility to draw without references later. It will train your eye and your hand. Also, at the same time you’re working on your “visual library”, you have to study anatomy techniques like for instance breaking figures from reference down into more simple 3D shapes. You have to learn how to draw groups of simple 3D shapes in perspective and then construct figures from them. However, it doesn’t come in one day and also, you’ll have to use tons of reference pics AT FIRST. You see what I mean? You can’t go from zero reference to “cool figure drawing” in one step, you have to use the combo “reference + anatomy technique” to be able to reach this goal.

Artists who train in illustration are taught how to draw from using a building block tool for construction, much like some of the pictures that you can see below. 

As I said above, it really takes a lot of training and practice to build objects from shapes. Basically every form begins as a shape. The more experience you get, the more you understand proportions and the more skills you will have to draw without visual reference.

In order to reach this result, you have to study anatomy tutorials. They always work more or less the same way, a bit like the pic above: decomposing the human body in geometric shapes or in elaborated stick figures. Here are a couple of video tuts.

TLDR: practice over and over again by using refs. Create a “visual library”. Learn to break the body into shapes. That will be the only way to make you come out of your comfort zone.

(Rainbow Comic Sans for maximum effect. I guess that now, I have everybody’s attention if it wasn’t the case til now)

Yes, you have rules to make things easier to draw from memory BUT THERE IS NOTHING WRONG ABOUT USING REFERENCE PICTURES!! It shouldn’t “kill you”, it shouldn’t make you feel guilty and you shouldn’t feel “less of an artist” because you need references for complicated poses!!! Plenty of pros don’t do art without models and props. And the old masters did the same thing. You want examples? Ok, let’s start!

Here’s a great quote from Alex Ross’ book, Mythology.

Ross’ biggest breakthrough as an illustrator came in June 1987 at the American Academy of Art, when he was introduced to the use of live models. “Before that, I had no idea how much I could grow as a draftsman. It was a huge turning point, because all through grade school I hadn’t so much as drawn from photographs_I’d always thought that you had to make it all up out of your head, and that’s how you did ‘fantasy’ illustration. Now I wonder if I would have developed even sooner had I drawn from life as child”

Photo session for a Superman drawing:

Alex Ross using the photos for his work (and you see the pose is not even complicated!)

And wait, MY FAVORITE PAGE EVER. PROFESSIONAL artists taking pictures of themselves and of their friends so that they can have reference pictures for their artworks. An example:

(Artist Claudio Pozas  posing with…huh…a modern day sword for one of his artworks)

And if you want a funny anecdote, you see Dean’s shoes in this art? It’s mine. I had a problem with the pose so I took a pic of myself with a camera and worked from the pic.

Yeah…but for manga and comics, it’s more stylized, they don’t use refs…Artists draw from the top of their heads…and…HA! HA! HA!!!! MEGA LOL! Two examples from my personal archive. Here is a picture taken from a Japanese program. I don’t remember the name of the artist but this mangaka is drawing a page for his forthcoming comic and instead of drawing from memory do you know what he did? He asked his assistant to pose for him. He took a pic with a Polaroid and…voilà!

The guy is in his 70′s!! He’s a super experienced artist and he still uses references for his art.

Let’s carry on! Another example. When I was a teen I bought an artbook by artist Takeda Yaoi (my first yaoi stuff!) and two of the poses looked familiar.

You bet it looked familiar. The artist used as reference, pictures of members from some my favorite bands at the time, Gene and Menswear (90′s teenagers, fan of Britpop, hello…).

(Pictures: L’UOMO Vogue, May-June 1995). And yes, we are in 2016 and I still have this magazine and this artbook at home. I..have problem throwing things away, ok? ><

Also, do you know what comic artists use nowadays for referencing? 3D softwares like Poser.They create the pose with a 3D model, they orientate the model according to the perspective they want and they use it as ref. It doesn’t mean they aren’t “real” artists, it just makes life fucking easier and it reduces the chances of anatomy mistakes.

(The picture above proves that not ALL the artists in the business use models or reference pictures xD)

Listen, I understand that you want to draw from imagination, that for some reason it makes you feel “freer” and that some poses are complicated to obtain from refs (the super dynamic “spider man poses” for instance) but it shouldn’t “kill you” to need refs to draw the human body when you really need it. If it’s to sketch or to draw “super comic style” poses, ok, why not, but otherwise WHEN IN DOUBT: REF!!! Particularly when you work on something complicated or on a big project like an artwork, for a book, a comic cover, etc..Do you understand? Even dôjinshi artists who seem to sketch things from the top of their heads use refs. I KNOW IT BECAUSE I KNEW SOME OF THEM.

TLDR2: Drawing from imagination is cool, it’s convenient for some poses or for some styles (super dynamic comic poses) but otherwise, don’t feel guilty for using refs! Pro artists do it all the time and now that 2000000 miliion images are available on the Internet, they do it even more than before!

Good luck anon, YOU CAN DO IT!! ♥

anonymous asked:

Do you have any headcanons for Kevarchie's first date?

Lmaoooo alright after that pile of Angst Fest I’ll give you some fluffy goodness lmao (why am I like this? the world will never know)

- Archie stalls for weeks on asking Kevin out. He’s so nervous. He doesn’t want to mess this up the way he seems to mess up everything else.
- But he does eventually go for it, fidget toy spinning faster in his fingers than anyone’s seen it go before.
- “Do you wanna go see Wonder Woman on Saturday?” Archie asks as he catches Kevin at his locker. Kevin considers for a moment then shrugs.
“Sure, sounds fun.”
“Cool! Cool. Maybe dinner after?”
- The relief and hope in Archie’s voice make Kevin pause again, looking up at the redhead as he processes the words. “Do you mean like a date?” He asks slowly, not really letting himself hope.
- Archie nods, nervous again. “Yeah. Yeah, I’m trying to ask you on a date.” He’s so nervous he knocks the fidget spinner right of of his hands, cursing softly under his breath.
- Kevin gets to it before he does, a smile on his face as he hands the fidget back to Archie. “Well then, I’m looking forward to our date.” He answers, grinning at Archie and hugging his books to his chest.
- Archie beams right back, a blush colouring his cheeks.
- Kevin manages to keep it together for a little while, but as soon as Archie’s rounded the corner he’s blushing darker than Archie’s hair, messaging the girls about outfits and if that really just happened.
- Saturday rolls around, Archie goes to pick Kevin up. He’s wearing a Veronica Approved outfit (ironed purple button up with black jeans). When Kevin answers the door Archie forgets what he was going to say bc holy hell Kevin looks good.
- Leather Jacket. Kevin’s in a leather jacket. Archie didn’t know that was even a thing he would want to see until it was standing in front of him.
- They’re both blushing, stuttery messes. After a few minutes, Archie remembers the flower he’d bought Kevin and hands it over. Kevin beams, putting it in the vase on the hallway buffet before following Archie out to his car.
- They drive out to the fancy cinema that holds novelty cups bc Archie’s a nerd that collects those things. Kevin says he’ll get snacks (“Including your cup, yes.”) if Archie gets tickets and half of lunch after.
- Both of them are too enraptured by the movie to make any moves. They’re just blindly shoving popcorn into their faces as they stare at the screen.
- After, they’re both raving about how awesome it was, both of them stimming with fidgeters in their excitement.
- They get chips from some takeaway shop, the kind covered in chicken salt and are so good you know they’re bad for you. They mostly filled up on popcorn anyway, and they’re having fun.
- They’re halfway through the box when Kevin goes. “I need more of that stuff, really… Arch? Take me to the comic book shop?”
- Archie is so excited!!! Jughead lost interest in comic books a few years ago so he’s had no one to share them with since. The comic book shop isn’t far, they can walk to it from where they are and Archie shows Kevin all his favourites, gets him into the Wonder Woman stuff and has piqued his interest in Dicky Comic stuff (he’ll probably just lend those to Kevin for now).
- Kevin’s a bit more into this than he thought he would be. He gets a Wonder Woman comic and a Star Trek comic (he’s always loved Sulu), and buys Archie a little figurine that makes the redhead blush when he confesses why he’s buying it.
- Archie buys Kevin the second Wonder Woman volume in return.
- “Archie you know you don’t have to keep track with an even amount of presents, right?”
“I mean, I do? But also, there’s a thing?”
“Brain thing?”
“Yeah, a brain thing.”
“Gotcha.”
- They jam out to pop music on the way home, bc they’re both top 40 trash.
- Archie walks Kevin up to his door, blushing red again as he hesitantly puts a hand on Kevin’s shoulder. “Um. May I?” He whispers softly, feeling the blush spread to his ears as Kevin says yes.
- The kiss is soft, closed mouthed but that’s fine for both of them. It’s good, sweet, and they’re both red and beaming when they pull apart.
- “We’ll do this again.” Kevin says softly, wrapping Archie in a hug.
“Yeah?”
“Absolutely.”
- It’s the best date either of them has ever had. (For now)

5

These have been attracting a lot of attention on twitter, so I thought I would post them here. I talk a lot about how I store comics, so as a part of the Support Gotham Academy campaign I thought I’d share.

I use BCW binder bags for modern/silver age comics (They hold 2 comics with a basic board in the middle) and unikeep view binders to store all 2,000 or so of my books. The binders close like a case to keep dust and other debris out, and the plastic wraps around the entire case so you can put a single sheet of paper in as a presentation cover. They hold between 4-16 comics each and cost between 5-7 dollars each depending on the size. I bought a large format  canon printer just for the project (I know, I make bad choices) and use 13X19 thick poster paper which I cut down to size post printing. I have to feed each piece of paper into the printer one at a time and of course I have to design each book cover and update the book information. It takes a LONG TIME to make them, a LOT of commitment, and it is easily the LEAST affordable way to store comics, so I can’t say I recommend the process to anyone. But I had a vision and the vision needed to be seen out. Not all of my binders have covers yet, only 40 or so do as of now, but I have been steadily chipping away.

Anyone who can correctly name the series by its cover in the last photo gets kudos.

Here’s the thing.

If the new Batgirl redesign/creative direction doesn’t succeed *the way DC wants it to* they will most likely cancel the book. They won’t try another new direction. They won’t bring Gail back. They won’t bring Oracle back. They will reduce their female led book and female artist counts each by one and go back to their “no girls allowed” clubhouse. That’s bad for everyone.

So it doesn’t really matter whether you like the suit, hate the suit, nitpick the suit, hate Brooklyn, boycott everything that mentions HBO’s Girls, or whatever your thing is. I completely understand and agree that the loss of Oracle is still a huge hole DC has not even remotely shown interest in filling. But getting this book canceled is not going to bring Oracle back. In fact, if this book gets canceled, that’s probably several steps backwards on the path to getting Oracle back.

Basically, this book needs your support. Female creators, superheroes, and fans need your support.

I’m talking to you, Carol Corps, Kamala Korps, fans of Rogue and Kitty and Jubilee, the Lumberjanes, PB and Marcy and Fionna and Cake. If you’re happy with what you’ve got, if you don’t need any more ladies in comics forever, then ignore me. But DC doesn’t have to be stuck in the dark ages forever, we can show them that efforts to produce books like those we already support and love from other companies will be rewarded.

Check out the first issue. Preorder it from your local comic shop, even. Buy the variant cover. If the book appeals, buy the second issue.

Look, I know we’re not all about supporting DC out of principle, but this can’t be about boycotting a company until everyone who works there you dislike is fired (as appealing as that may sound.) When you try and train an old dog to do new tricks, you have to use positive reinforcement.

Batgirl’s new direction deserves positive reinforcement, at least to start with.