i miss these idiots so much

I miss her man, I miss her so much. But how the hell do I tell her that?”, my friend asked me once. It might have been the stupidest question I had ever heard because the answer was so obvious. “You do not tell her, you show her. Show her that you care and show her that her presence makes your day better.
—  It is so easy to say things but taking actions is the hardest part. // ck.writes

Tfw you’re tryna read up on the occult but your pet poltergeist keeps trying to distract you. FFS Beej. AKA: “Whadaya need the books for, babycakes? You got the real deal right here!”

Reblogs are loved but please don’t repost this artwork, or remove the caption!

You blamed me as if you had done nothing wrong.
—  fuck you
Misogyny in Much Ado About Nothing

I’ve read a lot of scholarly articles on Much Ado About Nothing that dismiss Don John as a terrible villain, or criticise Shakespeare for the lack of finesse in constructing him, but honestly, I’ve always felt like that’s the point.

Don John is no sly, silver-tongued Iago – he is crude, brash and malicious. He makes statements like “I am a plain-dealing villain,” goes about attended by idiot henchmen, and takes advice and inspiration for his plots from others around him.

But even so, this weak caricature of a villain nearly brings ruin upon all of Messina.

How?

Because, even before he had made plans to trick Claudio into thinking Hero was unfaithful, the culture of Messina had already done most of the work for him. Don John is not the true villain of this play; he is merely an agent. The real villain of Much Ado About Nothing is the culture of misogyny in Messina.

From the moment Benedick and the soldiers return to Messina, they engage in lewd sexual banter and joke about horns, adultery and cuckoldry. Leonato’s first instinct upon greeting them is to make such a joke, for when Don Pedro politely inquires if Hero is his daughter the old gentleman immediately quips, “Her mother hath many times told me so.” This banter speaks volumes about the underlying misogyny and anxieties about female sexuality that the men share, and it works to create an atmosphere that is ripe for Hero’s shocking rejection.

Thus, all Don John has to do is suggest to Claudio that Hero is unfaithful, offer him a sliver of proof, and the prince and Claudio, made susceptible by popular myths of female inconstancy, find the rest of the proof themselves. Claudio starts to see certain cues as evidence of Hero’s guilt where before they were badges of honour. He declares, “Her blush is guiltiness, not modesty.” And so Hero, by the simple machinations of a cardboard cutout villain, is publicly disgraced, left for dead, and threatened with death by her own father, showcasing how quickly those seemingly harmless jokes about women can escalate to actual violence.

What’s more, this culture of misogyny is what keeps Benedick and Beatrice apart. These two dorks start the play madly in love with each other, but their shared fear of horns and cuckoldry divides them. Beatrice is also repelled by Benedick’s attitude as a self-confessed “tyrant” to her sex, and patriarchal culture has convinced her that no marriage could ever be happy, and no man faithful. Both of them (but especially Benedick) must thus overcome and abandon patriarchal values and the culture of misogyny they are entrenched in. Again, the culture of Messina is the antagonist, not Don John.

Beatrice has the advantage of being resentful and rebellious towards patriarchal culture from the very beginning, and so it is Benedick’s conquering of his sexist attitude that becomes the axis on which the rest of the play turns. He starts off entrenched in a culture of toxic masculinity, but once he acknowledges his love for Beatrice, and after he sees Hero disgraced and left for dead, he becomes sickened by the views he once held. Beatrice flies into a rage at her cousin’s treatment, and in no uncertain terms rails against misogyny and the patriarchy and the culture that nearly killed Hero. She wishes she “were a man for his [Claudio’s] sake,” telling us that, were she a man, she would use her position of privilege and power to protect women rather than abuse them. Her next wish, “that I had any friend would be a man for my sake” is a challenge to Benedick to do what she, as a woman, cannot: defend her cousin with action, not words, and publicly oppose the culture of misogyny in Messina.

This makes her initial request, “Kill Claudio,” less a demand that Benedick murder his friend and more a plea that he break with the toxic culture of male camaraderie. And Benedick agrees. In the midst of a play saturated with jokes about women’s volubility and defined by the rejection of a supposedly unfaithful woman, he then makes the monumental decision to trust Beatrice. He listens to her when she grieves and finally asks her a single question: “Think you, in your soul that Count Claudio hath wronged Hero?” When she replies in the affirmative, her word is all the proof he needs to part with the prince and challenge his best friend.

When he meets with Don Pedro and Claudio, they are keen for him to validate their treatment of Hero with his witticisms, plainly desiring to hear the japes about cuckoldry he had trotted out at the start of the play. But with Hero almost “done to death by slanderous tongues,” Benedick knows tongues are as deadly as swords in Messina, and so leaves his wit in his scabbard. He challenges Claudio and informs the prince he intends to discontinue his company, officially cutting his ties with their little boys’ club.

Speaking to Margaret shortly after, Benedick claims he has “a most manly wit… it will not hurt a woman.” He no longer uses his tongue to scorn or denigrate women. Instead, he uses it to delight them, turning his efforts to poetry and song, and courting Beatrice with the jokes and witticisms he once reserved for his male friends. Shakespeare uses Beatrice to convince Benedick, and by extension the audience, of the shortcomings of masculine culture and shows us that true valour comes from men using their strength to protect women rather than hurt them: for this alone may Benedick call his wit “manly.”

Through their love, Benedick and Beatrice conquer the true villain of the play: misogyny. Don John, who is merely the agent, is instead undone by Dogberry and his idiot watchmen, who discover the plot and bring the truth to light. With all put right, the end of the play provides the denouement where Benedick, having proved his valour and cast off misogyny, is at last free to marry the woman he adores. He makes a speech where he mocks the old views about women and marriage he held, gaily advises the prince the marry, and tells Claudio “love my cousin,” the implication being that the only way Claudio and Hero will live happy is if Claudio follows Benedick’s example, throws off misogyny and loves and trusts his new wife as Benedick does Beatrice.

Much Ado About Nothing, quite simply, mocks the hypocrisy of patriarchal society at every turn. It questions why men should demand chastity in women when they display none themselves, and why women are thought of as sexually insatiable when experience generally showed the opposite. The play’s accompanying song Sigh No More is even about the unfaithfulness of men. The lyrics declare “Men were deceivers ever… to one thing constant never,” and the men of Much Ado tend to live up to this, being generally lusty and faithless while the women are constant and faithful. Shakespeare disproves common myths about female inconstancy by making Hero the blameless victim of men’s obsession with female chastity, a scapegoat onto whom all their repressed fears are projected. And Don John, the active agent of the culture of misogyny, is a bastard, living proof of men’s infidelity and unfaithfulness.

So yes, Don John is a terrible villain – but that’s precisely the point. His weak characterisation feeds neatly into the play’s subversive agenda. For what could this bitter, scheming man have accomplished had the culture of misogyny not predisposed Don Pedro and Claudio to suspect unfaithfulness? What power did he have over Benedick and Beatrice, and how did he serve as their antagonist?

Don John is not the true villain. Misogyny is. Hero’s shocking rejection and near-death proves how dangerous misogyny is, and how easily violent words lead to violent actions. Meanwhile, the witty, sparkling lovers journey together to overcome their internalised prejudices, and provide vivid proof of what happiness a marriage based on trust and true equality can bring.

Much Ado About Nothing is play about a battle of the sexes – and only once the two sides call a truce and join forces to overcome the real villain, misogyny, may the happy ending be achieved.

“Barbie”

The only person that Barbara allows to call her ‘Barbie’ is Jason. 

This goes back when they first met and worked together for the first time when Jason became Robin. Jason had always been fond of Barbara because she was this cool older pretty girl that he gets to work with and like you have to be an idiot to not find Batgirl attractive.

Whenever they were in their civies at events and such, Jason would call out to Barbara as Barbie much to her annoyance but she didn’t fight him because what’s the point.

“Hello Barbie, can I get you some refreshments?”

“Looking good, Barbie. You’re such a doll.”

“Smart and beautiful. You truly are a Barbie”

When Jason died, no one has called Barbara ‘Barbie’ since and she honestly misses it and having him around. One day when Jason came back as Red Hood, Barbara was curious about his Red Hood so she started to investigate him as Oracle and once day she managed to track him down.

“You were looking for me? I hope you’re offering me a job. I could use the money.”

“I never do business with the bad guy. I want you to stop killing people.”

“If you do your research, I only kill the bad guys. Scums who don’t deserve to live.”

“You’re just as bad as them. Batman will never let you get away with this. I’m warning you.”

“I don’t care what the old man says, Barbie. I’m doing this my way,” he says before disappearing into the night.

Barbara paused and realized that this Red Hood called her ‘Barbie’ and there’s only one person who calls her that. She knows Bruce has been investigating this guy and she wondered if it was her position to tell Bruce what she discovered. Whatever the case is, she knows the ending of this isn’t going to be pretty. 

@whore4batfam Did I pull your heartstrings? I want to give you as many hcs before you go on hiatus so you’ve been warned. :) 

The Signs as Tim Gutterson quotes
  • Aires: Evenin' soldier. Uh...I didn't bring my cape. I hope this will suffice
  • Taurus: Keep talking I'm gonna throw this stapler at you
  • Gemini: I can’t carry a tune. I don’t know how to shoot a basketball and my handwriting is uh, barely legible. But I don’t miss
  • Cancer: At least you got to shoot your father. Mine had the nerve to die before I got back from Basic with skills and a loaded weapon
  • Leo: I'm a deputy U.S. Marshal ordering you to give me some chicken
  • Virgo: I love this shit. This shit gets me hard
  • Libra: I want Sigourney Weaver to choke me out with her thighs
  • Scorpio: You want me to kill 'em or wing 'em?
  • Sagittarius: I'm not playing. I'm an idiot. You can ask anybody
  • Capricorn: This may as well be a slow night in the champagne room for how comfortably erect I'm gonna be watching your bitch ass squirm about
  • Aquarius: You have three seconds before we kill every one of you
  • Pisces: Between the one-legged evaporating computer nerd and the walk-in this morning, you're on fire today

Imagine waking up on Christmas morning to a call from your parents saying they had a break in, and that they had managed to handcuff the intruder at gunpoint (something that was legal where you live) and that the police were on their way. You quickly drive over to check on them, only to find a very flustered Doctor handcuffed on the dining room chair. He gets incredibly happy to see you, and reveals that the TARDIS had accidentally given him your old address instead of your current one.

“Oh hello!”
“Doc?! What are you doing here?”
“Well I was trying to surprise you for Christmas but… wrong house I suppose.”
“Yeah- you supposed correctly!”
(Parental Unit #1) “You know him?!”
“Yes, unfortunately. This giddy idiot is the Doctor.”

(GUYS LOOK AT HOW CUTE AND HAPPY HE IS I MISS HIM SO MUCH OMG HE’S SO ADORABLE LOOK AT THAT GIF HE’S SO PURE)