i lucifer by glen duncan

5

You guys! I reached 666 followers and in honour of this special number let me introduce to you a bunch of my favourite devils, demons and wicked creatures from literature and movies:

✣ Mephistopheles [a main character in the ”Faust” legend, from which many writers and musicians as Goethe and Boito took inspiration]

✣ Asmodeus [from “The Devil on Two Sticks” by Alain R. Le Sage - 1841]

✣ Old Scratch or The Black Man [from “The Devil and Tom Walker”, a short story by Washington Irwing - 1824]

✣ Woland [from “The Master and Margarita” by Mikhail Bulgakov - 1967]  

 Matilda or Rosario [from the 1796 gothic novel “The Monk” by Matthew Gregory Lewis]

 Black Phillip [from the movie “The Witch” written and directed by Robert Eggers - 2015]

 Zarenyia [my damn favourite one, from the novel “A Long Spoon” by Jonathan L. Howard - wearing her angora sweater, a gift from Johannes Cabal (a necromancer of some little infamy)]

 Declan Gunn or Lucifer [from “I, Lucifer” by Glen Duncan - 2003]

 Hastur [from “The King in Yellow” by Robert W. Chambers and appeared in other Cthulhu mythos by Ambrose Bierce and Lovecraft]

 John Melmoth or Melmoth the Wanderer [from the marvellous 1820 gothic novel “Memoth the Wanderer” by Charles Robert Maturin]

 The Devil [from “Peter Schlemihl’s Miraculous Story” by Adelbert von Chamisso - 1814]

 A. J. Crowley [an angel who did not so much fall as saunter vaguely downwards, from “Good Omens” an amazing book by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman]

 Lilith [a III century A.D. demoness from the Babylonian Talmud and some Jewish legends - she refused to become subservient to Adam so she left the Garden of Eden (you go girl!)]

Thank you so much, guys! 

anonymous asked:

Saw your personal post of your bookshelf and was wondering if you have any more books recs? (That is not Neil Gaiman's nor Terry Pratchett's 'cause I already added all of their books on my tbr list lol). I genuinely love your taste.

ahahaha I’m very flattered to hear that you trust my taste, thank you friend!! Definitely, definitely start with Discworld and Good Omens but here are some of my other all time favourites and some books that just stick out of the general mass to me, in no particular order:

the Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas - just an excellent freacking novel that somehow carried through as my main comfort book since childhood, I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve reread it at this point but the last time was last December and boy does it just never lose its charm. Don’t get intimidated by the length, it reads very well (even my 9 year old self didnt find it boring hahaha) and the multiple interwoven storylines although complex are easy to follow.

Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham - tbh I didn’t expect to love this book as much as I did but it won me over, it’s a quasi-autobiographical coming of age story about a shy boy with a club foot going through many of life’s ups and downs and trying to find the meaning in it. Maugham’s writing style is just lovely and it’s one of those books where you’ll find incoherent thoughts, fears and other emotions that youd usually brush off and not even bother to acknowledge staring back at you perfectly put into words and you just feel understood.

The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov - Easily an all time favourite. Religious satire, if you enjoy Good Omens, check this one out next. Premise: the devil comes to soviet-era Moscow, does some people-watching and throws a party. Bulgakov wrote it to be a caricature of soviet society but I think it nevertheless passes the test of time and will be enjoyable to anyone. As far as translations go, I checked out the Burgin & O'Connor one a few years ago and recommend that one, I found it does the book justice.

I, Lucifer by Glen Duncan -  Another religious fiction. To be entirely honest I’m not yet done with this one but halfway through I do already love it enough to recommend it. Lucifer is offered a chance at redemption, the condition being that he has to take over the body of a writer who had just committed suicide and live a virtuous human life as him, with a trial period of a month to decide if he wants to commit to it. So he decides “fuck it I’m just gonna have some fun and also write a book about what’s it’s like to be me”. It’s profanely hilarious, witty and very thought provoking.

The Humans by Matt Haig - Similar premise to the last one actually, but in this case an alien takes over a scientist’s body and the book is his observations on humans. Not to sound dramatic but tbh this book cheered me up during a very unpleasant time in my life, it’s maybe nothing too elaborate and special but made me look at some simple every day things in a different light, and reading it just felt like a very good, long and comforting hug.

Momo by Michael Ende - Just a really sweet, whimsical and lighthearted tale about Time, Death and the dangers of capitalism. It’s a short childrens’ book that really sticks with you for a long time after you put it down and I strongly recommend it to anyone.

Century by Sarah Singleton - I generally have a huge weakness for cyclic storylines, and this one is just so aesthetic. I find it very similar in mood to a lot of Gaiman, like the Graveyard Book, Coraline, the Ocean at the End of the Lane. It’s melancholic, creepy, beautiful, has a nice steampunk-ish mood to it and the kind of plot that is better discovered as you go rather than described beforehand.

The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly - This one is a bit on the “Edgier” side of fairy tale retellings that I’m usually strongly against, but BoLT struck a chord with me fsr. It’s very reminiscent in terms of atmosphere (and kind of plot too) of Over the Garden Wall. If you like the “more serious takes on fairy tales” genre, check it out!

The Secret History by Donna Tartt - This book is just. So damn immersive and picturesque. When a scene is described you feel as if you’re there. It’s basically a book about a murder that isn’t focused on the investigation but rather on all the events and characters involved in it, it’s more an aesthetic experience than a far reaching story. I fell in love with Donna Tartt’s slow pacing and long descriptions and awfully pretentious but tragically likeable characters.

the Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelazny - An imo outrageously underrated sci-fi/fantasy series by a friend of George Martin’s, about a dysfunctional royal family fighting for the throne of their world. It’s a bit convoluted and would be long to describe but the world building in this series is absolutely incredible and very unique and different from most high-fantasy, I strongly strongly recommend it to all fans of more popular series like LoTR or ASoIF or Name of the Wind.

Night Watch series by Sergei Lukyanenko - Modern fantasy book series that I’ll forever have a soft spot for. The set up is that among regular humans there are some called Others that can manipulate energy and cast spells, and basically have varying levels of supernatural powers. These are divided into the Dark Ones and the Light Ones and both sides try to keep up a balance of good and evil in the world by surveying one another. That one too is a bit complicated to explain but it’s really interesting and the stories touch up on lots of different topics and have lots of fascinating reflections about morality done in an entertaining way through endearing and marvelously flawed characters. Here though, I don’t know how well the translation was done, sorry about that.

A general author recommendation is Christopher Moore’s stuff!! I’ve been making my way through his books to ease my Discworld withdrawal pains, and while I do still prefer Pratchett by ten miles, Moore’s books are genuinely laugh-out-loud hilarious and endearing.

I, Lucifer, Fallen Angel, Prince of Darkness, Bringer of Light, Ruler of Hell, Lord of the Flies, Father of Lies, Apostate Supreme, Tempter of Mankind, Old Serpent, Prince of This World, Seducer, Accuser, Tormentor, Blasphemer, and without doubt Best Fuck in the Seen and Unseen Universe (ask Eve, that minx) have decided - oo-lala! - to tell all.
— 

I, Lucifer incipt - by Glen Duncan

Best incipit ever? Probably so.