i lost $10 this week some how

4

10 November: Some photos from the past week or so. I lost my planner (ADHD, not even once) so I bought a Moleskine to replace it, along with a copy of The Blackthorn Key. All the copies at my Chapters were signed! I’d forgotten how large the type in children’s books are though, but it’s as good as all my friends have insisted it is. I also made a vinok at a Slavic culture day, and when I sent a photo to my aunt she promptly informed me that the flowers were incorrect. 

Not as easy as it Looks...

I have lost count of how many people ask me how much I make at my job because they are thinking about being a truck driver. I mean, “It’s just driving around! Easy job for easy pay, right?”

Not really, no.

We work a 70 hour work week. Typically the 14 hour clock with 10(11) hour driving maximum though some states (like Texas) has it on a 15 hour clock with 12 hours max driving (and that clock can be paused so you might work a full 24-48 hour shift depending on what you’re doing)

Driving is easy. You might have to learn how to shift properly and such but the basic mechanics of driving is indeed very easy

MANEUVERING is NOT

Allow me to get in depth here on the pros and cons:

Cons:

We are driving what is classified as a weapon of mass destruction. I have never seen as much death as I have from trucking. Rollovers, cars cutting us off, cars braking right after cutting us off, Icy condition driving, A truck popped a tire right as they were approaching a bridge and ended off going over into the river thousands of feet below.

Of course there is the not so deadly dangers, wide turns, parking lots, residential roads. Some with more than one trailer attached. Some with more than two (poor souls).

Every day, the driver does a full inspection of the truck and trailer at the beginning and end of the work load (Pre-trip/Post-trip). For some drivers (like me), we are a part of a fleet that has us ‘slip-seating’ which means a new truck every day, so it is even more important we do these inspections since there are lazy people out there that half ass it. We also need to make sure we have the right licensing and registration paperwork and all up to date. (It’s a good sized binder full of papers for each state of what items we can carry and where.)

POLICE ahhhh the police. We are the mother-load for them if they find anything wrong with our truck, trailer, or papers. They can pull us over just because they can for a random inspection. Often, they are not kind about it either.
On that note:

ANY ACCIDENT CAN BE THE TRUCKER’S FAULT.

A car ran a red light and hit your truck?
That is your fault because as a trained professional, you should have been able to predict that that car was going to run that light. (I am not kidding this happens)

An accident occurred in the fast lane, three lanes away from your truck and had nothing to do with you at all?
Officer can pull you over for a full inspection and because you have a running light out on the right side, that accident is your fault!

DO NOT SPEED. EVER.

Not even the 5 mph over that is usually pardoned. You can get a ticket for 1mph over if the officer is particularly cranky. 

Also, the Loneliness can get to you. Most companies won’t let their drivers have a pet on board due to the nasty people that didn’t clean their trucks (Thanks a lot guys) so you get stuck by yourself. For hours. Music and CD books can only get you so far before you start to yearn for a bit more interaction. I am no longer in a relationship but getting a really great headset has really been a worth the price as I make a lot of calls so I can chat and hear the voice of my family and/or friend. It helps but I live for the days a friend or loved one comes on board with me. It really makes the drive easier with company.

Though these are just main highlights I think it’s times we see the:

Pros:

The PAY is very nice. As long as you don’t get picky, and work well with your crew, you could make near $2000+ a week!
I wear out after my second-third trailer depending on the routes so I am pretty steady at the $800-$1200 range.
That is quite a bit compared to the warehouse workers or grocery store clerks that see this job as a godsend.

There is a freedom to being a driver that isn’t achieved in a cubicle. Everyday is a new sight, lots of people to chat with about anything, I can wear whatever I’d like (within reason) though some companies require uniforms. I take breaks whenever I need them as long as I arrive on time for my loads and 

NOONE can MAKE me drive if I feel UNSAFE.

See that storm picking up? Starting to feel nervous at the ice and snow?

SAFETY FIRST. PULL OVER IMMEDIATELY.

NO LOAD IS WORTH YOUR LIFE.

Sure, the crew might try to coax you into going anyway but the decision is yours to make and you cannot be penalized for it. Sure it messes with your pay a little but I think ending up stuck in a ditch would mess with it more…if you survived.


Now let me make this very clear.


I LOVE my job. Very much. I just don’t want people trying to become a driver, wasting time and money, only to quit once they see how hard it actually is…or get killed as I have seen happen to many.

5

I’ve been working out for a year and a half now. I’ve gotten bigger and smaller over the course of that time. I lost a lot of weight at one point because of an illness, and I still haven’t been able to get fit how I used to be for some reason! I thought I’d give @crushfit a try about a week ago and omg I loved it @bbbenwilliamson @aubernutter! I decided 10 minutes before I was going to the gym tonight to buy it. And I did! It really pushes yourself to the max! I think the last time I did that much work was when I played soccer in high school, honestly. I’m so stoked to see the progress yet to come! HAPPY FIRST DAY OF CRUSH!! I can’t wait to workout again tomorrow! Excuse the messy bathroom, and yes, I did stand on a chair to get a picture of my legs lol.