i liked the layers on this one

Right of the back of @faline-art‘s recent Tempest Shadow, we have an autumn Apple that they did a few weeks back! Things are getting a bit more chilly here in Utah, and I find myself wishing I had a few more layers of warm clothes between me and the winter air when during the rare times I’m outside. I have to admit, seeing a happy Apul like this one warms me up a bit inside. Has to be one of my favorites from their gallery. Again, give them a follow if you haven’t already!

This one was a bit spontaneous. I had it in my ‘to color’ folder for a little while now. It was only when Amarynceus invited me to a multi stream that I had to find something to color on the quick. I don’t like to miss any chance to stream with the greats, after all.

Original sketch and the coloring process below.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Hi there! I was wondering if you had any tips that could help an artist transitioning from traditional mediums into digital? I could use all the help I could get! Thanks in advance!!

Hi! There’s definitely a learning curve moving from traditional to digital, so don’t be discouraged if things feel kind of hard to pick up at first. My number one suggestion is to make sure you understand how layers function in whichever program you’ll be working in (know what different blending modes do, and learn the shortcuts for clipping masks and grouping to save yourself time!). Also, if you’re using a tablet, try using a felt nib in your pen. It’ll give the pen a lot more friction for that ‘scratchy’ feel like traditional pens/pencils on paper. I find it a lot more comfortable and natural to use, and it might make the transition less jarring for you. I hope that helps somehow!

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  1. My normal style
  2. Thicker lines, cleaned up a bit, colored lineart
  3. Just the sketch with color underneath the layer rather than atop

Just some very slight differences but maaaannnn, I might have to apologize for your eyes, anon. But trying other differences is making me realize just how much I love my own weird one. I mean, yeah it’s kinda strange with how the lineart looks and there’s this odd merge between foreground and background. But it’s a fun process that I enjoy and kinda made it my own thing. 

Doesn’t mean I won’t stop trying variations in my style! It just means I’d like to keep my work around my normal style for the time being.

I also got a lot of asks with people complimenting my style, and offering their own criticism on what worked for them. Can’t respond to you all atm because I have to head off to class, but thank you!! <3

Layers of feeling emerged that had never made it past One Direction’s group songwriting sessions, often with pop craftsmen who polished the songs after Styles had left. He didn’t feel stifled in One D, he says, as much as interrupted. “We were touring all the time,” he recalls. “I wrote more as we went, especially on the last two albums.” There are songs from that period he loves, he says, like “Olivia” and “Stockholm Syndrome,” along with the earlier song “Happily.” “But I think it was tough to really delve in and find out who you are as a writer when you’re just kind of dipping your toe each time. We didn’t get the six months to see what kind of shit you can work with. To have time to live with a song, see what you love as a fan, chip at it, hone it and go for that  … it’s heaven.”

damn this always hits me.

dcverse2  asked:

can you do some art tutorials for your amazing qrt style??!!

Yeah you know, when ever someone mentions something like that I think I wouldn’t know where to start. I can show people how I do what I do but teaching people a style feels a bit strange. I think everyone has their own style underneath layers of influences and practice that can be digged out through practice and exposure to inspiring works/artists. I guess my fear is one of those things like Bobby Chiu  does where everyone comes out doing the exact same thing? like a factory of American commercial illustration ready for films etc. 

dusteddyes  asked:

50 Favorite thing about your character.

Ahh! There is a lot of things I love about Susie, really. She started off as a joke character to be silly and blow off some steam from my more serious, and main character at the time, Lirea. Just some one note baby to hopefully cause some laughs for anyone walking by. The Vanderbilts were supposed to be like the reality TV show family of the Reach. She just sort of took over from there and became more layered over time, as they do when you RP them, and was just really fun to write.

So I guess my favorite thing(s?) about her is that she is mostly just silly and fun to bring to life. I always have a great time when I RP her and I like to hope that others have fun interacting with her as well!

i’m

not sure what i was trying to do, but here’s this height chart i guess??

chocokuma  asked:

hi!! i ws wondering if u had any advice on picking good colors in art ?? the colors u use always seem to go together really nicely hehe ,,

there’s a lot of really good color theory materials out there that would explain how it all works far far better than i ever could

but i will show you a couple of good tricks i learned along the way that will save you a lot of time and trouble if you don’t like watching/reading loads of theory (which you should still watch/read btw, i’m not saying to ditch it altogether) and more of a practical learner as i am

i often start coloring with simply using an eyedrop tool to choose base colors, it helps to keep the same color relations as the original, that way you won’t end up with white-washed characters or wrong tones of clothing 

in case of this drawing the final piece has water right under the characters, so i chose to make palette warmer on the top and colder on the bottom

the easiest way to make a soft, less contrast palette with the same color relations is to add a solid color or a gradient under the lineart; no overlay style, just a semi-transparent layer with color; on the contrary if you want a more contrast image you’d set overlay on multiply etc

colored lineart is optional, really. a lot of times you’ll hear DON’T COLOR/LINE WITH BLACK!!!!!!! that’s fake news, black lineart can make an image pop very well, but it doesn’t work with everything, so choose wisely

there’s two ways to add shadows to your drawing - by adding shadows (duh) or by adding the absense of shadows

i use both ways but since i almost never see anyone mentioning the second one: what i mean by it is you need to fully cover your characters in solid shadow and then erase the parts with light

a lot of artists choose the color of shadow individually for every part of the drawing - skin, hair, clothes etc; i personally like to choose one color for shadow and

one whole shadow layer not only saves you a ton of time, unlike choosing color individually, but it also means you can freely play with the color of it, which can affect your image A LOT

now back to the main palette! this trick is for photoshop only as far as i know

PS has 2 really helpful overlay styles - Hue and Color and as the names suggest it changes the hue or color of your image based on the color above it

PS also has a fun thing called Gradient Map (Image -> Adjustments -> Gradient Map) that converts the monochrome tones into ANY colors of the same relation

the last trick i’ll show you is particularly useful when you’re too lazy to color the lineart

i fill base colors by using paint bucket tool, it’s simple and fast, but it also means no colors under the lines 

which is annoying but what can you do right? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ actually there is something you can do! here’s a step-by-step

that’s all that comes to mind for now, hope it was helpful in any way! most of these tricks were born out of the notion “how do i produce a really good image with as much saved time and actions as possible”, which probably won’t do for perfectionists, but to all the lazy artists out there like me - try it lmao

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how to wake up ur prince: a step by step guide by prompto

1930s Animation: How it came about, What happened to it, What it influenced.

Hey guys! So recently as I’m sure a lot of you know, the 1930s style of animation has made a resurgence in the forms of Bendy and the Ink Machine and Cuphead! So I’m just making this to show where it comes from c:

Before you start though, I’ll be mentioning Max Fleischer in this post, and you can find out more about his life in the book Out of the Inkwell. I don’t have it myself as I’m pretty poor, but I’d love to read it soon <3

Was It Walt Disney?

It depends on what kind of style you’re thinking! Walt Disney’s work began with an animation known as Alice’s Wonderland (1923).

which, looking onto his future works, is a lot more different. The cartoon look is there; however, those famed Pac-Man eyes aren’t, neither are the rubberhose limbs and thick black characters. Those came into his work later on with his Mickey Mouse shorts such as Plane Crazy (1928) and the first animation to feature synchronized sound, Steamboat Willie (1928). The bouncy animation is there, squashing and stretching all the characters and objects!

Though, Steamboat Willie was actually not the first animation to feature Synchronized sound! That would be credited to  “Oh, Mabel, Mother, Pin a Rose on Me” (1924) (Which I actually can’t find…Here’s the song though!) and later on, My Ole Kentucky Home (1926).

There is a lot of…Drama….surrounding the relationship between the studios of Disney and Fleischer, but this isn’t going to be about that (though I may touch on it), I would definitely recommend looking it up though, it’s very fascinating.

Around this time, the scary looking Lip-Sync animation started to come along and the styles were fairly similar, though the Fleischer Car-Tunes were a lot more, in my opinion, clean, however didn’t fully stretch their characters as much as Disney had been doing later on.

Who are Fleischer Studios?

Fleischer Studios first opened around the 1920s as Inkwell Studios. It was created by brothers Max and Dave Fleischer, whom were Born and Raised in Poland. In 1914, Max Fleischer created the Rotoscope, a device that could allow the animator to create smoother productions as they had been drawn over Filmed reference.

Using this Process, they created the Out of the Inkwell (1918 - 1929) series, starring Koko the Clown!

Max included a lot more Live Action in his animations than Walt Disney and even revolutionised the way it worked due to his own inventions, including The Stereoptical Process (which I’ll show more on later), that gave him a good edge forwards during their prime. However, due to A Series of Not Quite Fortunate Events, he never quite overcame Disney and, unfortunately, his studio met a sad end. 

What other Cartoons did they make?

Fleischer Studios made a surprising turn with bringing in Less Live action footage over time and creating more Lovable characters such as Bimbo The Dog and Betty Boop (1931). (Betty Boop being another can of worms entirely with the problems her design created and the blow it dealt the studio)

It was around this time that people could start to notice the style’s true beginnings. The famed Eyes had begun to appear, the Clearly Animated Flat props and characters over the detailed painted environments, and the rubberhose stretchiness of their movements.

Bringing in Cuphead as reference, both Hilda Berg and Cala Maria were heavily inspired by Betty boop’s design as mentioned by Studio MDHR’s Jake Clark in their GDC (Game Developer Conference) talk, which I’d definitely recommend watching.

Besides these characters, perhaps one of their other most Well known characters was Popeye the sailor man! featuring Sinbad, a character I’m fairly sure inspired the design of Cuphead’s Captain Brinybeard.

In this animation you can see every part of the style’s inspiration. The watercolour backgrounds, the flat Cel characters and their stretchy, rubbery movements, and, shown in the image above, the Two-Tone Technicolor process (A secret in Cuphead for those who don’t know). This was another issue between Disney and Fleischer, as well as their own Financial problems with Paramount Pictures, so they had to resort to using cheaper methods, resulting in the above image being created by layering a negative-spaced film reel through red and green filters (basically, it was complicated back in the day, no easy layers then).

I’d definitely recommend looking up more Fleischer cartoons too if you’d like inspirations for your own works or for the animation practise, such as Swing you Sinners (1930) which I honestly think is one of the biggest influences in terms of the recent style too!

Why does Disney have this style in their animations now?

Honestly I couldn’t tell you that myself, as personally I myself am not really a huge Disney fan. Considering his past with the studios he worked in or rivalled, I never really had a soft spot for him. However, I like to hope that he took inspiration from Max Fleischer. Max was unfortunately met with the worst circumstances with working under Paramount Pictures, The Great Depression hugely hitting his work, and his relationship with his brother Dave deteriorating. (honestly I wish this studio was still here and Paramount not).

You could say the style was stolen, or developed, or inspired, being shown in Mickey Mouse’s more updated designs as well as just a general staple of “Old Animation” with the eyes and Thick Black characters. Either way, it’s the fact Fleischer inspired generations with the little miracles he created that is the important thing. I wish people would stop attributing these qualities initially refined by Fleischer to Walt Disney and giving him more credit than he deserves, but that’s just my own opinion. 

Should we keep making animation in this style, or move on?

Please keep making things in the old rubberhose animation styles. Yes it’s an old aesthetic and yes it’s not…the best out there, but it’s an incredibly endearing look that I think is a love letter to the old days of animation. 

You will get those who pick at the details of how it doesn’t fit quite with the style (With Bendy being a victim, his proportions and shapes being very inaccurate if put into the Fleischer/Old Disney style), however, it’s how you bring that style and adapt it to the modern world, how you make it so that you’re not merely just going by the original rules of how you create these characters and worlds. Yes, Cuphead strictly stuck to these details as beautifully as possible, but Bendy was, though I’m not a fan of his design myself, a great addition and evolution of the style into the modern day.

As nice as it is to remember these styles for when they came from and what they were inspired by, it’s always nice to know it’s just that, a style. You can continue to create in that style as much as you want!

However, if you ever want to say/credit where the style came from, though Disney did create a style similar to this and adapted some of its individual aspects into their work later on after, the Vast majority of it comes from Fleischer Studios. It’s a common misconception, but an understandable one considering the studio no longer exists and how popular Disney is.

If you ever have more questions about it, go ahead and ask! I’d love to research more about animation and give you information on any specifics within the studio, the troubles they faced within themselves/with eachother or other studios that were present back then :D <3