i know not all feminists are like this

anonymous asked:

Lana saying that she is kind of feminist now because with trump women are less safe is just silly and selfish. Feminism stands for more than just women, for more than just american people, women in other parts of the world are suffering the worst hell and we act like it doesn't happen at all. And she ""should"" be feminist for everyone not just because herself feels less safe. (I'm not attacking anyone nor lana)

I feel like Lana is still in the early stages of being “woke” you know? I mean it’s taken her a LONG time to get this far you know? Like she’s speaking about what she’s currently seeing and what’s currently in the news. I don’t think she’s feminist for just herself.. I mean she’s got money so she doesn’t need Planned Parenthood or anything but I get what you’re saying. Lana’s been in her own little world for so long and she’s just started coming out of it and learning about what’s really going on for other people. I don’t even think Lana called herself a feminist. 

It’s not silly or selfish to stand up for this issue.. because it is a problem.. and could become a big problem… and not just one that affects her. The Women’s Marches were most importantly about healthcare/ planned parenthood and that is something that is a extremely important for women in poverty. Just because there are worse things out there doesn’t mean it’s not a cause worth fighting for. 

I just want you all to know that when I’m like 72 and I have a story in the New Yorker and my 3 hour absurdist feminist moral parable is screening at c*nnes I’m gonna have lesbiandennnis.tumblr.com archived on the wayback machine and scholars of the future r gonna have to analyze my dream mommy live action fancast as a vital part of my artistic oeuvre

This week I had a lovely conversation with an older dyke who reminded me how much a lot of people have always hated TERFs and SWERFs. 

She was talking about the time in the 1970s and 1980s when she was a young radical dyke and how many of the awesome dykes in the radical scene were trans women. So I asked her if there was ever any problem with TERFs and SWERFs. She didn’t know those words so I described them. Her reply was (paraphrasing a longer conversation):

“Oh, you mean the political lesbians? That’s what we called them at the time, no one really considered them radical. They hated everyone. They hated bisexual women who dated men. They hated us leather dykes and kinky dykes because they thought we were ‘copying the patriarchy’, they hated trans women. None of us in the radical scene liked them. A lot of them later left and admitted that they were straight but were presured to identify as lesbians in that group because being a feminist to them meant cutting all ties with men. They were like a cult. They often lived together and if you didn’t walk the political line you were dead to them. Intense stuff. ”

And like, I know her memories don’t have global relevance and there have also been places where TERFs had a much more prominent impact on the local radical women’s community, but still, to hear how despised these TERFs have always been by these truly radical dykes cheered me up a lot. 

  • Women: Why do men spit in public?
  • Men: Where ELSE should we spit? On you??? Do you want us to spit on YOU!?! Alright, FINE.
  • Women: A teenage girls bra strap shouldn't be a reason to send her home.
  • Men: Okay. Okay, alright. Alright, okay, okay. Well why don't I just PULL MY DICK OUT IN CLASS THEN!?!?
  • Women: A person should have the right to an abortion.
  • Men: Ohhhhh women want abortions! Well men should be able to rape them, that seems like the logical equivalent of this situation.
  • Women: Women need to defend themselves from violent men.
  • Men: Oh, what, you can hit me but I can't hit you!? why CAN'T I hit you? WHEN can I hit you??? Tell me when I can hit you, please. I want to know. I need to know.
  • Women: Men overreact a lot.
  • Men: WHOA. Why would you go there? Why do you generalize all men like that? I feel so attacked. This is so hurtful.
  • Men: This is why no one likes feminists.

so lots of people have been asking me my thoughts on laci green’s “red pill” stuff recently. some, in an accusatory way (”why aren’t you a good feminist like laci green?”) and some in a confused way (”help im not sure how to process this”).

i’ve largely avoided commenting on it publicly for personal reasons. i dont like talking about individuals instead of ideas anyway, but there was just some stuff going on for me irl that made me not want to comment on this specifically.

but, at this point, i think laci is doing enough harm that it’s worth publicly saying that i really don’t like what she’s doing or how she’s doing it. i could go into a whole like in-depth thing examining every single point in her two “red pill” videos and analyzing her tweets because there’s a lot to unpack, but honestly that’s not worth my time because it won’t convince anyone of anything. people who want to support her are going to support her, and vice versa for those who don’t. i’ve had my arguments about it already and it’s tired and boring.

as an overarching critique, though, all i will say is that she doesn’t need to 1) throw other feminists under the bus or 2) befriend people who engage in online harassment.

you might not think she’s throwing anyone under the bus, and you might not think the people she’s befriending engage in online harassment – but again, i’m not trying to convince anyone of that. that’s just how i see it.

myself and other feminist creators have gotten a lot of backlash for not being ~open to a dialogue~ like laci, and i don’t think she has done anything to defend us. i think she’s tweeted a couple times that “not every feminist has to debate like me” but then the rest of her rhetoric is full of “i hate how so many feminists refuse to engage in dialogue but don’t worry everyone i’m a good feminist”. and not only does that throw us under the bus but it makes the wildly inaccurate assumption that none of us have ever engaged with any competing ideas which is a beloved anti-feminist talking point but patently false. many of us engage with these ideas, just not in the form of livestreamed debates. we’ve had our arguments, we’ve spent hours arguing over the same points, we’ve wasted our time trying to convince people of things they refuse to accept.

it’s just that she seems more interested in pandering to anti-feminists, complimenting them, and making them feel good than she does protecting the people who are at the receiving end of anti-feminist harassment campaigns.

and when people have said extremely horrible horrible things about me and my friends and tried to make our lives hell for months (or years), it hurts to see a large feminist youtuber like laci defending them and leaving me and other feminist youtubers out to dry.

i personally do not think engaging with anti-feminist ideas is a bad thing. contrary to popular belief, i talk to people with opposing viewpoints all the time (but riley you block people on twitter! yeah, conversations happen off twitter, fucking shocking i know right). but at some point, i’m just repeating myself. the arguments have been had. the points have been made. and i don’t have the money, the time, or the energy to devote 8 hours a day to arguing with anti-feminists. if someone else wants to do that, i think there’s a way to go about it that does not involve befriending anti-feminists or elevating small anti-feminists channels to a larger platform. engaging with the ~other side~ is not inherently bad – discussion and dialogue can be useful – but you have to be careful of the way in which you do it. one aspect of that is the difference between discussing privately and debating publicly. public debates are a spectacle, a show. they’re not conducive to learning or growing or conceding points. they’re conducive to proving you’re right and they’re wrong at all costs and being able to say you “owned” them the next day.

i think laci is approaching this in entirely the wrong way, and it seems to me that she has either fallen for a lot of bullshit anti-feminist talking points or is pretending to in an effort to get closer to them. either way, i think it’s kinda messed up.

anyway, that’s all imma say on the topic. the more we all talk about laci and hype up the little drama she has created, the more she profits from it and is incentivized to continue doing it. im done caring about this show she’s putting on, and i’ll continue doing the intersectional work she has abandoned.

You know those cutesy embroidery-looking graphics with, like, a butterfly saying “Be a bitch” or “Never Apologize” in cursive letters? (and the butterflies and flowers with faces and pastel colors are supposed to show that these are messages for women, only somehow that isn’t sexist)? They show up a lot on certain pop feminist blogs and they’ve always bugged me.

Anyway, I kind of want to do a series of opposite graphics. Like, a really metal looking t-rex saying in spiky, blood-dripping letters “Be polite to all you interact with” or a flaming shark saying “err on the side of apologizing if you think you may have hurt someone.” Fuck the “cutesy aggression” aesthetic. I want snarling, badass, compassionate etiquette.

npr.org
Why Do Men Harass Women? New Study Sheds Light On Motivations
Researchers interviewed 4,830 men in the Middle East and came to some surprising conclusions.

Esraa Yousria Saleh was walking down El Hussein, a busy street in downtown Cairo famous for its souvenirs and tchotchkes, when a man in his early 20s made eye contact with her. He followed her, circled her, then suddenly — she felt a hot breath in her ear:

“I would like to put it all inside.”

Saleh, 28, a feminist and activist based in Egypt, was furious. Why did that man feel like he could look at her? Follow her? Say those lewd words to her?

A May study from Promundo, an international research group, and U.N. Women sheds fresh light on men’s motivations for harassing women on the streets in four areas in the Middle East: Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco and the Palestinian territories.

“We know quite a lot about women and girls but nothing about men and boys” when it comes to harassment, says Shereen El Feki, co-author of the report and the author of Sex and the Citadel: Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World.

anonymous asked:

Lmao what's wrong with Laci Green? You said "God you sound like Laci Green" (Disclosure: I haven't watched her videos in a couple of years so I don't know what she's done now)

this would be pretty fuckin twef-y on its own without this absolutely hilarious display of how little she knows about biology here:

nasty.

hey fuck your phd i’m uhhhh a sex ed teacher…. basic bio 101 says ur neuroendocrinology phd is uhhh bullshit and wrong?“

she’s just, over all, a bad feminist? iirc she said zootopia was about misogyny in the work place instead of. y’know. racism, which is what it’s actually about. a lot of White Feminists have a problem with thinking anything can be about anything besides white women’s problems

[disclaimer: i’m white too lol pls call me out if i do this]

Dear Liberal Feminists: The Hijab is Not Empowering

I am in Baghdad right now and I have my back to the wall as I type. I am slowly moving my laptop closer to my chest and looking around to make sure nobody else sees what I am writing. I am Iraqi. I am a woman. I am Christian. And I am not a hijabi.

Iraq, much like Iran, used to be a more secular place. The Saddam regime was brutal, but he kept Islamism in the country under control until the end when he sensed his loss of power and began turning to Islam. That is what regimes here usually do.

Liberal feminists will tell you the hijab was a response to the West. It is a defiant act against imperialism! It’s not. I am here and I promise you, the hijab is not empowering.

First, not all Iraqis are Muslim. If Islam is what unites us against imperialism, then where does that leave me? Subjugated. As a Christian and as a woman.

Second, and more importantly, women cannot reclaim our bodies by falling beneath another form of hegemony. “We do not want to submit to the Western men, and therefore we submit to the Arab men” is hardly a step forward.

Let me clarify: I do not want the Western armies in Iraq. They rape, torture, and kill Iraqi women and attempt to steal our limited resources for themselves. I do not, however, think abuse by Arab men is somehow a step in the right direction.

When Saddam fell, Iraqi men quickly searched for power. Those who did not find it are doing what emasculated men always do. They are practicing power over the women in their families.

I find it disgusting but expected that women’s clothing is always inspected. Whatever we wear, it is always the wrong thing for some people. I am not here to tell women what to wear. I am trying to dissect the idea that the hijab is empowering especially here in the Middle East.

In Iraq and in every other Middle Eastern country where the hijab is not required by law, (it is required in Iran and more extremely in Saudi Arabia), there are two specific demographics I have noticed wearing it:
1. Poor, uneducated women
2. The family members of Islamic leaders

I will focus on the first of these before moving on to the second. It is my experience that in almost every country in the world, poor and uneducated people are the most performative in their religion. When I lived in Spain, this was the case. The poor old women who walked along the beach were more devoted to their Christianity than I, a Christian from a place where my family was persecuted for it, ever was.

But both my parents are professors in biology and studied when Baghdad was the best place in the Middle East to study. None of my friends here, who are mostly Muslim, cover their hair. They come from educated families. They do not need to lean on religion.

For poor women, this is different. They are not likely to receive an education and understand from a young age they will need to depend on a husband or be a burden to the family. They often do not have jobs so if there is abuse in the household they are trapped. They have to follow the rules of men to survive, more than I do.

If these woman do not cover from a young age, they will not find a good husband. Men are close-minded and possessive and they cannot deal with a possibility other men saw such “intimate” parts of THEIR wife.

Their families pressure them to follow these rules. An uncovered woman will bring shame to the family first by revealing herself and then by not finding a good husband to provide for her. They are pressured to cover as young as eight and nine years old. Can any person that young devote themselves to an outfit for life?

Street harassment is very common in Baghdad. The few times I have been harassed when outside with hijabi women, they have blamed me for not covering. “I am Christian” I will say. “The men know that” is usually their response. The culture is so toxic that women with the hijab believe they are superior to those without it.

But materially they are inferior and they know that. In almost every case, women who do not cover are wealthier, more educated, better-employed, less-dependent on men, and live materially better lives. So what do poor, uneducated women have? Religion. I really can’t blame them.

Religion is also used as a tool by the second group I mentioned, the Islamic leaders, to unite and control the masses. Sure, your family is starving and your babies are dying from preventable diseases. But what do I offer you? Eternal life in heaven as long as you do everything I tell you in the name of God.

This makes people feel included and gives them purpose. It also creates a hierarchy in society. When men are permitted and even encouraged to oppress the women in their lives, they are more likely to follow the leaders that allow this. It makes them feel powerful. Men, especially poor men, want to feel power over something or someone.

In this way, the hijab is empowering… but only for men. It strips power away from women. It represents a society moving backwards in many ways.

Many women will tell you they choose to wear the hijab or they wear it for Allah. Once you ask questions, you will find this is less true. In almost all cases, they began wearing it at a young age (and always under eighteen) and were pressured by family.

I am hypocritical because I too perform “feminine” things because of family or society pressure. I wear my hair long even though it bothers me and I wish I could shave it off because I do not want to face society’s judgment for doing that. But at least I realize the source of this contradiction.

Western liberal feminists who praise the hijab are forgetting about the rest of us. I am terrified of a day I live in a place where covering is the law. Iraq is my home and I don’t want to leave, but sometimes I think maybe I don’t belong here especially if something like my hair can get me killed.

In every country, we need to have a larger conversation about what women say we want and what we really want. We also need to realize the broken logic of “wanting” to do something because it pleases men.

Liberal feminists: I know it is scary for you to criticize the hijab because then you have to admit some of your personal choices are actually part of your effort to serve the patriarchy. We all need to face this fact because if we don’t, we cannot get any closer to liberating ourselves.

it is absolutely, hilariously astonishing to me how often i’m asked to provide a 25 page extensively sourced MLA formatted academic style paper about why i think pansy parkinson is a character worth discussing, but…here we are, i guess.

first thing’s first—

fanon pansy =/= canon pansy.

canon pansy =/= fanon pansy.

canon pansy is a one-dimensional bully with no discernible personality traits beyond “mean” and “myopic”. she’s villainized by the story. her primary function within the narrative is to follow draco malfoy around. she’s background noise. she giggles, and she shrieks, and she makes fun of harry & co. pansy parkinson is also a figurative dumping ground for an alarming number of awful, misogynistic, enormously unflattering stereotypes for female characters—her relationship with draco is depicted as at least partially one-sided, which makes her seem desperate; she has a tendency to mock other students for their physical appearances, which makes her seem insecure; and she’s likened, more than once, to a literal dog. literally. a dog.  

(rowling had a truly terrible habit of peppering the hp books with a lot of these villainous non-characters, who were almost always slytherins, and who were almost always described as either unattractive, unintelligent, or both. see: millicent bulstrode, who is jokingly suspected of being related to a troll. marcus flint, who cheats at quidditch, is held back multiple school years, and has appallingly bad teeth. crabbe & goyle, who are violent, overweight, and implied to need draco’s help with her homework in order to avoid flunking out.)

canon pansy is a poorly constructed caricature of a Mean Girl who readers are meant to find abhorrent. all the ingredients for a spectacularly unlikeable character are there. it’s like rowling had a checklist.

that said, pansy’s role as hermione’s social foil gives her slightly more of a personality than the majority of the other slytherins. pansy is shown to be friendly with blaise zabini, who is, canonically, arrogant and enigmatic and disdainful of draco malfoy. pansy wears a pink dress to the yule ball. she likes unicorns. she possesses leadership qualities—she’s a prefect, she has a “gang” of slytherin girls—and is, by virtue of that, at the very least an above average student. she’s loyal to the people she’s shown to be close to. she cries when draco is hurt. her political affiliations, parentage, and blood status are categorically unknown. we can assume she’s probably a pureblood, and that she chose not to fight against the death eater regime at hogwarts, but she wasn’t a death eater. her dialogue with draco and blaise zabini about the war in HPB was ambiguously supportive, at worst.

(important note—one of the major themes in the books is redemption. see: severus snape. regulus black. the malfoys. rowling’s world building was full of lofty, often convoluted metaphors for racism and homophobia, which had the unfortunate side-effect of humanizing a lot of actively, violently racist characters who would have otherwise been unpalatable to any reasonably self-aware reader. the notion that grand gestures of bravery and self-sacrifice are necessary for redemption—again, see: severus snape, regulus black, the malfoys—is, however, repulsive to me, especially when the argument of worthiness is centered on a teenage girl who has, canonically, spent her formative years hanging around actively, violently racist people. And that’s not even delving into the numerous instances of benign racism perpetrated by characters who aren’t vile slytherin blood supremacists. see: the weasleys. albus dumbledore. rufus scrimgeour. the text goes out of its way to emphasize that combating internalized prejudices is an ongoing battle that has to be consciously fought. it’s a choice. but i digress.)

canon pansy =/= fanon pansy.

fanon pansy =/= canon pansy.

i see a lot of discourse about pansy being an inappropriate “feminist icon"—she’s a bully, she’s mean to other girls, et cetera, et cetera—and the irony of passing that kind of judgment on a female character whose entire narrative existence is predicated on her ability to compare unfavorably to, you know, all the good female characters; it is staggering.

so.

look.

i have loved characters like hermione granger and ginny weasley and fleur delacour since i was a child. they are smart and brave and interesting and Not Like Other Girls. their flaws are considered socially acceptable. hermione is bossy and narrow-minded; but she’s also usually right. ginny is outspoken and reactionary and obstinate; but she’s also pretty and popular and good at sportball. fleur is vain and self-absorbed; but she’s also beautiful and brilliant and fiercely loyal.  

Not. Like. Other. Girls.

not like pansy parkinson, for example, who is, almost unapologetically, exactly the kind of girl no one ever wants to be.  

she likes pink. she giggles. she cries. she chases after a boy who, at best, seems mostly indifferent to her presence. she’s self-conscious enough about her nose that it’s a well-known sore spot for other students to maliciously poke at. i don’t think we ever get a description of what her voice sounds like, but i instinctively associate her with a high-pitched, nasally whine. she’s petty—see: her interview with rita skeeter in GoF—and she’s narcissistic—see: her stint with the inquisitorial squad—and she’s a cliché, of course, just not an especially creative one.

there are obvious, valid criticisms to be made about how people interact with characters like pansy parkinson. and draco malfoy. and severus snape. but there is a huge difference between blindly excusing or romanticizing those characters’ actions and making an effort to humanize them.  

tl;dr

bad people are not bad characters.

no shade but i think most of you like black feminism only in theory. you want to appear to support the ideologies and such of black women’s feminism because you don’t want to appear racist. i don’t think many of you really know what black feminism is. it’s not second or third wave american feminism in blackface. black feminists were reviled and ostracized from major feminist organizing not only because they were black, but because of the content of their politics as well. if you all really knew what black feminism was, i really think most of you would hate it lol.

hi guys so my girlfriend’s name is blue sargent and this is why i love her

  • she accidentally became a vegetarian she just isn’t fond of meat so she eats so much yogurt and salads and totally packs fruit kebobs for lunch,,, what a nerd
  • she has an emergency sewing kit
    • henrietta high school legend says if you say “blue sargent” and spin around three times in the girls bathroom she’ll walk out of the stall and have the exact right button to replace the one that got ripped off your sweater
  • literal embodiment of “aesthetic or die”, she’d choose overheating in the middle of a virginia summer over ruining her look
    • “blue you look like you’re gonna pass out”
    • "i’m sorry, i misheard, i think you meant i look fucking great”
  • her guilty pleasure is 90′s boy bands she loves *nsync and backstreet boys and totally knows all the bad dance moves from the music videos
  • she’s tone deaf though can’t carry a tune to save her life but sings loud and proud anyway
  • she has a gap in her teeth just big enough to be noticeable, it whistles when she’s trying not to laugh
  • she’s a mug hoarder that brings tea up to her room but has like twelve mugs on her window sill from forgetting to bring them back down
  • her dad’s a fuckin woodland nymph so she’s ridiculously good with plants and her vegetable garden is the envy of the neighborhood
  • she’s a dog person she walks dogs as a job because she gets paid!!! to spend time with dogs!!! she loves it so much
  • once whipped out her switch on a boy twice her size for catcalling and scared the living daylights out of him,, attitude makes up for height and this girl’s got plenty of it
  • she’s not a bad student but she does get asked to leave class for sassing her teacher’s or telling them theyre wrong
    • “[insert historical figure] was gay”
    • “ms. sargent please don’t”
    • “history is so fucking gay you don’t understand-”
    • “please sit outside for the remainder of class” 
    • *cue deep dramatic sigh from blue*
    • the teacher called maura, who laughed her ass off and hung up the phone
  • she was riding her bike home one day and was late because she got distracted talking to a homeless guy while waiting at an intersection and she bought him some mcdonalds and played cards with him
  • LOVES stargazing so much, persephone taught her the constellations when she was little
    • when she misses her she goes and sits under the stars with smelly tea, wearing a pair of persephone’s socks. she feels closer to her that way and it hurts a little less.
  • the gray man didn’t teach her how to fight, calla did.
    • by the time calla is done with her blue can flip ronan on his back
  • speaking of ronan him and blue are best friends i don’t make the rules these are just facts
    • she has dream hair clips that change color
    • she sewed pockets into all his jackets for chainsaw
    • theyre combat boot buddies
    • she is Tiny and rides on ronan’s back or shoulders
    • she has literally taken a running leap and jumped on his back while he was in the middle of a conversation and he didn’t falter in the slightest
    • he rips up clothes for her so she can get that Punk Aesthetic
  • she gives the best hugs on the planet she is a tiny lady but will pull you in so tight and you can rest your head on her soft hair,,, wow
  • her nail polish is always chipped it lasts like an hour tops
  • there’s always kids running around the house and she is so good with them, playing tag, teaching them crafts and cool friendship bracelet patterns and she wears all the ones they make for her
  • you think ronan cusses up a storm? blue could give him a run for his money the girl’s got a mouth like a sailor
  • loves yoga but only knows like 6 poses that she does over and over, calla judges her
    • “blue why are you laying on the ground”
    • “im doing yoga. its called corpse pose. leave me alone youre fucking up my zen.”
    • corpse pose is a lie it’s literally laying on the ground 
  • that’s about it
  • my girl is a dorky feminist hippy and i love her
  • she deserved better
  • :))))
Trump Signs Bill Making it Legal to Kill Hibernating Bears: Even Hitler Liked Animals

If you’re reading this, you already know it should have been President Obama’s nominee Merrick Garland filling the ninth SCOTUS seat. And you’re up to speed on how the GOP changed Senate rules to get DJT’s nominee Neil Gorsuch confirmed after Democrats filibustered. 

Gorsuch was sworn in today, rendering one ninth of the U.S. Supreme Court illegitimate. 

What got overlooked in today’s news cycle: DJT signed into law a bill that now makes it legal to shoot hibernating bears and bear cubs and wolves in dens. The same bill makes it legal to shoot all three from helicopters, too. 

You know, even Hitler liked animals. 

I can’t tonight. 

anonymous asked:

first of all I wanna say that you're an actual angel. and second I wanna know if you know if Namjoon is a feminist? I saw somewhere that he said something about it but couldn't directly find it

First of all let’s define Feminism: the advocacy of women’s rights on the basis of the equality of the sexes. 

To be clear, Namjoon never said “I am a feminist” but his actions made people believe so, like when he talked about the importance of women’s education

Or called out demeaning women in the hip hop industry

Or when he co-wrote and composed 21-century girl a song about empowering women 

To conclude: The man is smart, modest, talented, handsome and supports both LGBT and Women (and got dimples, never forget dimples). Yep, that’s our leader, and that’s why he is respected by many. 

Originally posted by chimcheroo

I used to be one of those women who spent an hour or more doing my makeup every single day of my life. Like I wouldn’t leave my house to go get a cup of coffee or do grocery shopping without caking on a full face. And I lied to myself every single day about it. I told myself, as I penciled on my eyebrows, and lined my eyes with white eyeliner to make them look big and doll-like, and used thick oily foundations and concealers to hide every visible inch of my actual skin, that I loved doing this. That I was feeling more and more empowered with every inch of my face I covered up. That somehow, if I wore a bold lipstick shade or a unique eyeliner shape, I was making a feminist statement. By making my own flawed face flawless and therefore more marketable to men, I was taking charge of my own body and my own femininity. That’s how powerful advertising and media and social conditioning and all those other forces are. I thought spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars on makeup products and putting on a mask to cover my face just to leave my bedroom every single day was somehow empowering me. 

And the point of this post is not to criticize women who wear makeup, I totally understand the pressure. In fact, I still do wear a little bit of makeup most days. And I still fucking lie to myself about it. I tell myself “Oh, it’s just a little concealer to hide my zits, and it’s just a little brow pencil- I’m no longer wearing makeup to make myself look like an unrealistic caricature of a woman, it’s just to enhance my natural beauty.” Which is just another lie that the beauty industry has sold women for years, that’s taking a long time for me to unlearn. 

But overall as I become more and more comfortable without my makeup mask on, the more I realize that there’s nothing empowering, nothing glamorous, nothing healthy, nothing feminist about makeup and makeup culture. It really hurt me in my early teens, all the way up until now, and I want every woman who feels like she has to wear makeup, and every woman who knows she doesn’t to know that I totally support you. I’ll never be supportive of makeup culture ever again but to all those women who are still stuck in it, just know that your face doesn’t need to be fixed. Covering it up won’t ever make you feel better about it. 

TayLaur

It’s no common mistake that Taylor has had quite a connection with 5H for a long time now, apart from being the girls favorite at one point too. But it’s also no common mistake that she’s known for being “ the queen of PR games” in the music industry.

“They are the hunters, we are the foxes.” - Taylor

Our main focus though is something similar between Tay and Lauren.

 This is all observational based on recent discoveries. 

Also yes before anyone says anything,  I am aware that they come from different places inside of the music industry but Celebrity Culture makes no exceptions for anyone.

I know some harmonizers have beef against her for whatever reason it may be but stay with me this reaaaaallllly isn’t about beef.  Or is it?

Keep reading

Skulls and Roses ☠️🥀 (Part Five)

Jeon Jungkook

Tattooist AU!. College Au!

Genre: Fluff? - I guess, Tiny bit of angst

Word Count: 5k+

Part One I Part Four

Originally posted by bubblepopped

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One of my podcasting friends told me that he does stick up for women in challenging situations, like testosterone-soaked comedy green rooms, for instance, but complained, “I get mocked for it!”

Yes, I know you do. Welcome. Getting yelled at and made fun of is where many of us live all the time. Speaking up costs us friends, jobs, credibility and invisible opportunities we’ll never even know enough about to regret.

I know there’s pressure not to be a dorky, try-hard male feminist stereotype; there’s always a looming implication that you could lose your spot in the club; if you seem opportunistic or performative in your support, if you suck up too much oxygen and demand praise, women will yell at you for that too. But I need you to absorb that risk. I need you to get yelled at and made fun of, a lot, and if you get kicked out of the club, I need you to be relieved, and I need you to help build a new one.