i know it's the first question but this fits better

I actually usually use “Illust Studio”(It’s Manga studio in western side) for drawing my lineart, before I actually use Photoshop and its really getting out of control even if I turned off the pressure or with pressure. So I don’t recommend it much to use it as drawing. But for beginners, and you only have Photoshop, you can bear with it ww

But hopefully you’ll buy or get a new drawing program that is really good at making lines. You can only use Photoshop for some effects you want to apply on your drawing. It’s what I do! :^)

For doing the lineart, I’m pretty bad at teaching and explain how I did it since it’s how my hand moves when drawing ^^; In other words, its how I’m used to.

First, of course don’t forget to sketch up your drawings first. If you are unsure what you’re going to draw. Better go sketch first so you’ll know how you’ll draw them in proper way without sweat!  

Then!

Also don’t forget to experiment different brushes!! You might even find a kind of brush that fits your favorite way of drawing, because I do too before until I become dedicated to no pressure brush! (^∀^`;) Well don’t question me why all of the brush I love no pressure pen most…

Ah!! Before I forget it― The thinner the line the better too! Like this

Especially when drawing a robot/character in detailed and realistic way. Because thickening the brush will end up making your drawing look cartoonish… chibish― or simply looking like it’s not pretty fit for giant-detailed-looking-robots with thick lines;; ><

I hope my little tutorial will be quite helpful..! Even a bit;; I’m not really good at teaching my style but I tried! I wish you good luck on your progress in drawing!!  

insert-thejoke  asked:

Hello again:) First off thanks for the website it really helped! I have another question now that I started writing. The four characters in the team are all equally important so I've got four protags. The problem I'm running into is that three of them are women, so in a scene with all of them it's littered with either "she this she that she she she" or their names to differentiate them. I'm a bit out of practice writing in third person but it fits the book better, so I'm not sure how to fix it.

Pronoun Usage

You know, it definitely is hard when your characters are all the same gender and you’re trying so hard to avoid too much repetition. One solution that I see a lot of writers use is finding a third descriptor (other than name and pronoun) that refers to things like hair color or profession. I find this tactic jarring so I don’t advise it, unless you’re describing who that particular character is to the other character. For example, things like “her sister,” “her father,” “her boss.” In general though, I suggest some strategic editing. 

Notice I said “editing,” meaning it’s something you can do later on. In your last ask, you mentioned you were doing NaNo, so I honestly wouldn’t worry about it just yet. Use as many “she’s” as feels natural, and use the characters’ names in excess if you need to for your own clarity. Focus on getting the story down for now and try not to get too caught up on word choice. 

But I will elaborate on the “strategic editing” for your future use. Be mindful of paragraph placement, because that’s a huge help. If you start off a paragraph talking about a character named Laura, then you’re free to use “she” for the rest of the paragraph, and everyone will know you’re talking about Laura. So try to separate your paragraphs by which character is the subject of your sentences. And by “subject,” I mean: 

  • Laura ran.
  • Laura jumped.
  • Laura ate.
  • Laura thought.

So if you’re going along, talking about everything Laura did, and suddenly Kathy laughs, then Kathy has just taken over as the “subject” and therefore, you should start a new paragraph. Doing your best to give characters their own paragraphs makes it more clear when you start using pronouns. 

Now, what happens when you mention a second character, but she isn’t the subject of the sentences? Things like: 

  • Laura ran to Kathy. 
  • Laura jumped into Kathy’s arms. 
  • Laura ate Kathy’s sandwich.
  • Laura thought Kathy wouldn’t mind.

This is when things get tricky, and honestly, for me, it’s all about playing around with the words and seeing what sounds the best. Let me throw these sentences together and show you how I would edit it. 

“Laura ran to Kathy and jumped into her (1) arms. When she’d (2) eaten her (3) sandwich, she’d (4) thought she (5) wouldn’t mind.” 

“Laura ran to Kathy and jumped into her (1) arms. When she’d (2) eaten Kathy’s (3) sandwich, she’d (4) thought her friend (5) wouldn’t mind.”

If we ignore the fact that the contents of this paragraph make no sense (Seriously, why is she jumping into her arms after eating her sandwich), the actual action of the paragraph is clear. Use context to your advantage - Laura can’t jump into her own arms, so (1) obviously refers to Kathy. And when we identify the sandwich as Kathy’s, it becomes clear that Laura was the one who ate it, since the context of the sentence suggests that someone ate it that wasn’t supposed to. I also used “her friend” as a third option to name/pronoun, which I mentioned works well at the beginning of my post. 

So play around with context, mix/match your names/pronouns to see what sounds right to you. If you have a particularly pesky paragraph, get a second opinion and see how someone else interprets it. When in doubt, use your characters’ names. Clarity is the most important thing, so above all - make sure your writing is clear. A reader will get over a repetitive sentence faster than one that they have to read several times and still end up unclear on who did what.

Remember to just focus on getting the words out right now though, especially since you’re doing NaNo. These are micro edits that you can make later down the line, and the more you practice those edits, the more natural it will start to be during your first drafts. 

Hope that helped!

-Rebekah 

Spreading awareness or coming out to roughly 150 strangers

ATM I’m doing teaching training in a school for 5 weeks and they are doing a project week for grade 9 about sex . We teaching students are supposed to help out and talk to the kids because we are close to them in age. Things like STDs, contraception, homosexuality, going to the doctor, personal hygiene etc. (this is in germany btw). So I asked if they would mind me talking about asexuality. Most teachers hadn’t heard about it so I first explained it to them and I told them how damaging it was for me that I did not know that being ace was an option and how important it could be to talk about the difference between romantic, aesthetic and sexual attraction. The other teachers thought it was interesting so I talked to the 9th graders about being ace.

At the beginning the students sounded skeptical (“Is it real?” “Who cares?”) and were disinterested but I gave a good overview about the different identities and then they were allowed to ask questions. I’d answered the more offensive and private ones beforehand. Like how I’d never been in a sexual relationship, yes I masturbate, no I was not abused etc. I then got some really good and insightful questions about identifying as ace, coming out, if I was scared of being alone, if I felt emotions ( a bit insulting at first, but they thought I was one the autism spectrum or something - which would of course not invalidate my asexuality).

How I knew that I was ace was the first question they really wanted to know so  I told them about reading about it online and that it just fit me but I also confided that I wasn’t sure about being ace. I told them I didn’t know if I felt either sexual or romantic attraction (the nose/smell analogy really helpful) and that yes in a couple of years I could feel different but that identifying as ace atm made me feel better.

That was basically the whole point of me talking to them. I wanted to make sure that they knpw that its okay to change their sexuality, preferences, gender even more than once as long as identifying as something at that certain part in their lives made them feel better.

Then I had to explain how alienated and immature I sometimes feel in our hypersexual society.

I asked the students to explain to me why sex sells because I want to buy a functional object, why do I need to see a sexy woman/man and the students noticed how difficult it was to explain why using nearly naked people are a valid marketing strategy. And that it makes no sense for a coffee ad to focus on the romantic/sexual relationship and not on the taste of the coffee. They never realized how weird it this sex sells thing is and how present in every day life. For them sex was just a natural human thing.  

Preparing for that talk was really nerve wracking, especially since no one knew how the kids would react. I did the talk in four different groups. Most questions were the same but they were all listening and engaged with the topic. They were no insults directed at me and they did take me serious. Later on they told me that they enjoyed hearing about my experiences because most of the other talks/discussions were just facts/information and not personal. I am glad that I did that talk and I told the school that I would be willing to do so again.

I just wanted to share this experience with the community. For me this was really important and really scary (my friends and parents don’t know I’m ace). I wish that I’d had that talk when I was that age or older.

(Mod note: This is such an amazing story to read! Thank you so much for sharing it with us! We are so proud of you - seriously, I got chills reading this. Great job!)