i know it's not that impressive

Favorite girls of Kingkiller in order

Auri - if Auri isn’t at your top wyd?

Vashet - only second because Auri will always be #1

Felurian - when you can actually survive, she’s adorable.

Devi - let me see your ocean storm *dreamy sigh*

Penthe - adorable, smol, and filled with anger. “lmao men”

Laurien - my favorite tragic death, I was shouting the entire time I read.

Fela - a really cool cutie, put sim in his place (with you)

Shehyn - coolest grandma, really, she’s the best.

and girls I should mention bcz they were cool.

Mola - ok the reason i like her is because her name sounds like Fly Molo from ender’s game which is my favorite book so…

Hespe - If anyone can keep that bear of a man in line its you

Krin - I know we only got like 2 chapters of her, but she really left an impression.

Anyone Ambrose has ever courted - I’m so sorry that you had to go through that, you’re all beautiful and strong.

I’m so excited what girls I’ll meet in the 3rd book!

Keep reading

I just need to say, Dean made Cas a mixtape with his favourite Led Zeppelin songs.

Friendly reminder that John impressed Mary by knowing all the lyrics to Led Zeppelin songs.

Just saying, the Winchesters have a family history of using Led Zeppelin songs to woo the loves of their lives.

The fastest way to stabilize your patient that won’t stop coding... make them a DNR. Works every time.

Originally posted by ohmyyfelton

A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

  • what she says: I'm fine.
  • what she means: What is "It's time for the Jedi to end?" supposed to mean? When The Last Jedi name was announced, there was debate on it being plural or singular. The Italian poster indicated the meaning was plural. The impression before that was someone was going to hurt or kill Luke or destroy the order completely or maybe someone turning to the dark side. But the order already seems to be gone? Luke says "I only know one truth. It's time for the Jedi to end." This has no hint of defeat or rebellion. Why does it sound like Luke *knows*? Why does it sound like Luke *wants* it to end? Is Luke helping to make it end? If it's supposed to be plural, why does he say it's "truth" for the order to end? Is this a hint at Gray Jedi? Who is going to lose a fucking hand this episode please someone tell me
Something about Fate

Dean decides to go to a new psychic in town - just for the hell of it, of course - with his roommate Castiel, and doesn’t get the reading he was expecting.

~5.2k

AO3

“Hey, Cas, have you ever been to a psychic?”

Dean watched as Castiel looked up from his book with his eyebrows pinched together.

“No.” A pause. “Why do you ask?”

Dean shrugged.

“Garth texted me. Apparently there’s one in town that he went to yesterday and he’s obsessed. He said she really knows her stuff.”

Castiel raised an eyebrow before returning his attention to the textbook he had sprawled across their kitchen counter, so he could eat and study at the same time - a sight that was not all that uncommon in their apartment.

“Psychics don’t exists, Dean,” he said, matter-of-factly, as he turned the page. “People who claim to be psychic are scammers hoping to draw in the desperate or the gullible. Garth is the latter, I’m afraid.”

“Hey, he’s not -”

“Remember when Gabriel told him that stop signs with a white rim around them were optional?”

Dean rolled his eyes and pulled out a stool on the opposite side of the counter from his roommate.

“Duh, Cas. I know that they aren’t legit. Everyone does. But at the very least they’re supposed to be super good at reading people and then you essentially pay them to tell you what their first impression of you is.”

A small smile crept its way across Castiel’s face.

“I could tell you that for free, you know.”

Dean flipped him off as he got up and pulled out an apple from the refrigerator, not even bothering to look back as he did so.

“Whatever. I think it could be kind of cool.”

“Then by all means…” Castiel wrote something down in a notepad and flipped to the next page. “I think you should do it. I have free time tomorrow if you’d like to find this psychic then.”

Dean tossed the apple between his hands.

“You’d come with me?”

“Of course. I would never miss the opportunity to witness someone predicting your death.”

Castiel laughed as Dean flipped him off again.

Keep reading

Okay so two kids in my afterschool class that don’t really hang out much, drew this together and wanted to show me it really badly. They had so much pride in it so i took a picture. It was a boy and a girl that did it so the boy tells me “LOOK MS SHELBIE, ITS THE ILLUMINATI, ME AND AVI DREW IT. I DREW THE TRIANGLE AND SHE DREW THE EYE” I was just bursted out laughing, at it but i was also impressed with their memes.

In conclusion:

“What do kids love? Memes? The Illuminati? Memes about the illuminati? Yes. Yes they do.”

Drarry on their first date
  • Harry: So, um... Malfoy. Did you know that people have been playing Quidditch since the eleventh century?
  • Draco: Yes? Who doesn't know that? Why?
  • Harry: Oh. Well, it's just something I read in "Quidditch through the ages"...
  • Draco: *smirking* Why Potter, if I didn't know any better, I'd think you're trying to impress me.
  • Harry: *blushing* Well err... I...
  • Draco: I'm flattered.
  • Harry: You are?
  • Draco: Of course! You learned how to read. For me!

just another arya and dany parallel:

both are thrown into environments where they don’t speak the language. dany joins the dothraki where she is lost and alone. she cannot even speak to her new husband. but she has irri, a girl her own age, to teach her to speak their tongue. this helps her grow more confident among her new people. 

arya arrives in braavos and is instantly scared by the prospect of being friendless and unable to communicate in a foreign city. the waif becomes arya’s language teacher and *appears* to be of age with her. arya perfects her braavosi by living among the people while also learning several more tongues. 

Ship Names
  • Aries x Aries: Open Flame
  • Aries x Taurus: Mess with the Bull, you get the Horns
  • Aries x Gemini: Think before you Act
  • Aries x Cancer: Frustrated Tears
  • Aries x Leo: Spotlight Lovers
  • Aries x Virgo: Impulse Control
  • Aries x Libra: Lovers and Fighters
  • Aries x Scorpio: Left on Mars
  • Aries x Sagittarius: Adrenaline Junkies
  • Aries x Capricorn: Same Difference
  • Aries x Aquarius: Rebels Without A Cause
  • Aries x Pisces: Pure Imagination
  • Taurus x Taurus: Money Lovers
  • Taurus x Gemini: "I don't know how we made it."
  • Taurus x Cancer: Silver and Gold
  • Taurus x Leo: The Actors
  • Taurus x Virgo: Dressed To Impress
  • Taurus x Libra: Highschool Sweethearts
  • Taurus x Scorpio: Possession and Obsession
  • Taurus x Sagittarius: Restraints
  • Taurus x Capricorn: Sugar Daddy
  • Taurus x Aquarius: The No Comfort Zone
  • Taurus x Pisces: Lovers and Dreamers
  • Gemini x Gemini: The Twins
  • Gemini x Cancer: Head or Heart?
  • Gemini x Leo: Bring Me With You
  • Gemini x Virgo: Nerdy Babes
  • Gemini x Libra: Alice and The Hatter
  • Gemini x Scorpio: "You Only Call Me When It's Raining Out"
  • Gemini x Sagittarius: Philosological
  • Gemini x Capricorn: Doctor and Nurse
  • Gemini x Aquarius: Guess We're Heartless
  • Gemini x Pisces: Facts or Fantasy?
  • Cancer x Cancer: Clingy Couple
  • Cancer x Leo: Pulling Along
  • Cancer x Virgo: Netflix n' Nap
  • Cancer x Libra: Home is Where The Heart is
  • Cancer x Scorpio: Cigarette Smoke and Whiskey-Soaked Clothes
  • Cancer x Sagittarius: Homesick
  • Cancer x Capricorn: Mother and Father
  • Cancer x Aquarius: Head Over Heart.
  • Cancer x Pisces: Faith, Trust, and Pixie Dust
  • Leo x Leo: Model Lovers
  • Leo x Virgo: Attentive to Detail
  • Leo x Libra: "Relationship Goals 😍"
  • Leo x Scorpio: Late Nights and Bar Fights
  • Leo x Sagittarius: Hera and Zeus
  • Leo x Capricorn: The Princess and the Knight
  • Leo x Aquarius: Gods and Goddesses
  • Leo x Pisces: The Cowardly Lion
  • Virgo x Virgo: Attention and Details
  • Virgo x Libra: Pressed Flowers
  • Virgo x Scorpio: Red Rose, Wine and all that's Fine.
  • Virgo x Sagittarius: The Well Prepared Nomads
  • Virgo x Capricorn: Boss and Secretary
  • Virgo x Aquarius: Intellectual Lovers
  • Virgo x Pisces: Rational Emotional Breakdown
  • Libra x Libra: Sweet Love
  • Libra x Scorpio: Love and Lust
  • Libra x Sagittarius: Snow White and The Huntsman
  • Libra x Capricorn: Flower Crowns and Let Downs
  • Libra x Aquarius: The Social Butterflies
  • Libra x Pisces: Hopeless Romantics
  • Scorpio x Scorpio: No Strings Attached
  • Scorpio x Sagittarius: Didn't think we'd make it this far
  • Scorpio x Capricorn: Ambitious Passion
  • Scorpio x Aquarius: Harley Quinn and Mister J
  • Scorpio x Pisces: Bad Influence
  • Sagittarius x Sagittarius: Swingers
  • Sagittarius x Capricorn: Rockstar and the Groupie
  • Sagittarius x Aquarius: Detachedly Attached
  • Sagittarius x Pisces: Dream Team
  • Capricorn x Capricorn: Workaholics
  • Capricorn x Aquarius: Drug Deals
  • Capricorn x Pisces: "You're Grounded"
  • Aquarius x Aquarius: I'll Never Belong To You
  • Aquarius x Pisces: Science vs. Magic
  • Pisces x Pisces: Rose Colored Glasses

ok lmao im officially done with a significant portion of the overwatch fandom tbh??

i am tired of reading torbjorn hate.  i just am.  im tired of hearing he’s ugly, im tired of people saying he creeps women out, im tired of hearing he doesnt deserve happiness/his wife/his family/his house.

there is something really fucking evil about how many fucking people on tumblr demand “representation” and make fun of the physically disabled combat veteran and say that he should be homeless and doesnt deserve a wife or family or friends.  like, i get that we probably should have accurate representation for physically disabled combat veterans- 8% of the total us homeless population are veterans, though that number has dropped substantially (by 33% since 2010) but half of all homeless veterans are disabled.  but somehow i doubt, that this is asking for that representation and more about saying he doesnt deserve his things because he’s ugly and unliked in fandom.

its malicious.  its despicable.  

Torbjorn has dwarfism and the chronic headaches that go along with it.  im 99% certain that makes him the very first video game character to be a little person. 

tumblr has this massive problem of saying “I want representation!” but when they want it, they want it in their fucking pairings that they can “ship” and remember, from all of those shipping charts that put the little yellow circle around Torbjorn the same way they put it around winston- (Are you comparing shipping the physically disabled man with another person to bestiality or are you just upset because he’s not conventionally attractive?)

He’s close friends with mercy, with reinhardt, with ana, and from the halloween comic, probably jack and gabe too.  but in 99% of posts that talk about them he’s just left out?  like?? 

and the “creepy to women” thing, like where did that come from?  I know the voice lines you’re probably basing it off of too but i didnt ever read them as him being “creepy?”  (unless you’re saying he’s creepy because of that + his “gross” physical appearance thats attributed to his disability :) )

i always interpreted them as teasing, and several of the female characters tease back- (Mei, Ana, and satya sounds like she’s heard it before and knows he’s teasing her).  the only voice line that could be interpreted as strange would be the one with looking at d.va’s mech- but i dont think thats because its creepy, i think its because of the futuristic age they live in and how torbjorn is a world class engineer.  there’s a line between Pharah and Torbjorn where she’s showing off her raptora suit, and he has to be begrudgingly impressed by it.  its far more likely they dont want torbjorn getting his hands on the specs of d.va’s mech and she’s guarding them rather than her getting creeped out by him.

THEN THERE WAS THE MESS ABOUT PEOPLE COMPLAINING ABOUT HIM BEING SANTA.  like.  that was so good, so pure.  why were you complaining? because reinhardt wasn’t santa?  because 76 wasn’t santa?  bc neither of your conventionally attractive characters were santa? 

i s2g if i see one more post complaining about how only skinny, conventionally attractive white girls have gotten confirmed relationships in overwatch im going to scream because as long as there is so much rampant hatred and active dislike of the physically disabled man and his wife, that makes fun of him for being physically disabled and so often it’s by the same people who make those posts and i really just wanna reiterate this:

you’re making fun of the physically disabled man for his appearance and then going back and saying you dont want conventionally attractive people.  but you still want attractive people, but attractive in “unconventional ways”.

like, god fucking, i’m so tired.  im so tired. tea is spilt, rant has been made, if you want your stupid otp to be confirmed canon to get the “representation” you want just say it upfront.  

World of Wakanda is literally about black lesbians (and white men showing up where no one wants them and subsequently gettin they ass beat)