i just want to talk about books

http://comicbook.com/2017/02/26/infinity-war-looks-for-uk-extras/

This is a reason, I think, as to why he doesn’t have anything booked but is not saying why, or said he’s taking 2017 “off”. As of now we’ve only see his name in lists like this (and sometimes not) but we have no idea how involved Loki is in Avengers IW.

If he were to say-“I’m shooting Avengers for the next few months” it would be a spoiler for Ragnarok and would tell us that Loki is central to the plot perhaps.

Just a theory (and a hunch) but if Marvel doesn’t want him to talk about IW, then I can see him coming up with an excuse like “I want to fix up my kitchen” 😄

jackrabbitlovesong  asked:

Hi Seanan. I met you briefly at NYCC16, we talked about Rolling in the Deep? Anyway, I was wary about getting the Newsflesh series because zombies but you convinced me that I wouldn't regret it, and I haven't. I freaking MARATHONED the first 3 books, I'm halfway through Feedback and yesterday I bought Rise and Sparrow Road. I'm absolutely in love with your books and I just wanted to tell you how glad I am you talked me into taking a chance. So thank you so much XD

I am so glad you’re enjoying them!

I have a lot of friends who don’t like horror, so I’m pretty good at judging whether something will be too much for someone.

anonymous asked:

hey hey so anyway i've always read nina as bisexual in canon and i also see that around a lot and i was just wondering if you knew whether leigh has like, officially confirmed it?? bc honestly bi characters who end up with someone of the opposite gender are so rare i want more of them

yup leigh stated she never saw nina as straight, but she also doesn’t want to take credit for something she didn’t put in canon. she mentioned she would rather talk about it in a book, which i respect. you can’t really take credit for representation that’s not there. the only hint of it we got in canon was nina saying she flirts with women too. 

heart-deco  asked:

Hey Emily! I know you've finished your thesis, but I thought you'd be interested in this. I just finished Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld (like literally five mins ago - I blew through it this weekend), which is a modern retelling of Pride & Prejudice. It has an explicitly ace character, which I was really excited about! I won't say who, in case you plan to read it and want to remain unspoiled. It was really cool to see ace representation in a P&P adaptation. Let me know if you read it!

duuuuuuuuuude THESIS OR NO THESIS I’m always THRILLED to hear about books with explicit ace rep. I just ordered it on Amazon!! I’m so excited to read it, holy crap. Pride and Prejudice is one of my all-time favourite stories, it’s just [clenches fist] SO GOOD. 

have you seen the Lizzie Bennet diaries on youtube? it’s a modern retelling of P&P via a vlogging format - it doesn’t have any ace representation or anything, but omg, it’s SO sweet. I loooooooooved watching it so much. here’s a link in case you wanted to check it out :D :D :D

everyone talks about “did you put your name in the goblet of fire” being the worst book to movie dialogue fail but lets be real the worst is where hermione answers a question in class and snape calls her an “insufferable know-it-all” and in the book ron is furious and he goes OFF and says “you asked a question and she knows the answer! why ask if you don’t want to be told?” but in the movies they just make him say “he’s got a point, you know” and i’m still mad about it

anonymous asked:

Dear Duke, I have noticed something about my writing: I do not know how to conduct a dialogue. I do not know how to add an emotional "burden" to the discussion. It does not sound believable what I write. To me, it seems more like a lecture than a simple conversation. I just wanted to write engaging more with the emotional side of my characters than with the intellectual. How can I do it?

Hi! You’re in the right place because dialogue is actually my favorite thing to write and any book of mine you pick up will probably be like at least 40% people talking. Idk if this is because I did so much theatre or because I just can’t shut up, but it’s high time I did a real post about it, so:

Advice for Aspiring Authors: On Dialogue

  1. You need it so don’t resist it. Books that are just huge chunks of prose are exhausting, and if you never use dialogue you’re either (1) summarizing or (2) writing a really boring book, and either way the the result is the same. Your reader is going to be bored. Choosing the right scenic mode is important and sooner or later people are going to have to speak in the moment. 
  2. Don’t stress about speaker tags. Putting this at the top because a lot of new writers seem to get hung up on it. But I’ve already addressed this, so read this post here. Pro-tip? If you’re writing a conversation between two people or even three, you often don’t need speaker tags at all. I recently wrote a conversation that takes place over the phone which consists of about 25 lines exchanged and didn’t use a single speaker tag because it was, in all instances, obvious who was doing the talking. Later in the same MS I have a really chaotic hospital scene where like twelve people are yelling at the same time and interrupting each other and there are no speaker tags because idgaf if anybody knows who’s saying what. It should feel like chaos. (If you want a really great example of this, pick up a copy of William Faulkner’s Sanctuary and read the funeral scene.) Readers are smart. They’ll figure it out.
  3. Different people speak in different ways. Who a character is will often determine how they speak. For instance, Theodore von Wammelspout, Crown Prince of Prosenstatz, is probably going to have a very different dialect than Paw Paw O’Halloran, Louisiana shrimp fisherman. (If you want a better example of what I’m talking about, watch the movie Kingsman and pay attention to how and when Eggsy switches dialects, or read the prologue to The Taming of the Shrew and pay attention to the immediate tonal shift in Christopher Sly’s dialogue when he wakes up from a drunken stupor thinking he’s a lord.) Think about a character’s origins and upbringing and backstory when deciding how they talk.
  4. But stay away from writing dialect unless you really know what you’re doing. Don’t try to phonetically write a character’s accent or dialect unless you’re a linguist, because a lot of dropped consonants and deliberate misspellings can be really difficult to read, come out like you’re trying too hard, or even end up looking vaguely racist. If a character has an accent, find a way to tell us they have an accent and then spell all their dialogue correctly. There are, of course, exceptions to the rule–i.e, if a phonic misunderstanding is crucial to the story. But basically, unless you’re writing Trainspotting, don’t do this. What’s much better and much more effective is to describe how a character says something or what their voice sounds like. What’s the texture? The color? The temperature? A warm, rough, slow voice belongs to a different character than a cold, high, slick voice does. Or maybe the same character can switch from one to the other. Give your character’s voice the same attention you would give their body or their habits or anything else.
  5. It’s a character speaking, not the narrator. Each character should have their own voice, in the same way that each story will have a slightly different narrator, even if it’s a neutral third person narrator. Writing is all about voice and style, and part of the challenge is that you as the writer have to be a mockingbird and be able to speak in as many different voices as you have characters. It will take practice. It will require a lot of questions asked, such as “Who never says a bad word? Who swears like a sailor? Who talks in a constant, uninterrupted stream and who hardly says a word?” For an exercise, write out a plain uninteresting sentence like, “He was on his way home from the store when he got a flat tire,” the way the narrator would say it, and then rewrite it in every character’s voice. Because one character might say it just like that–”I was on my way home from the store and I got a flat tire”–and another might say, “You’re not going to fucking believe this. Okay, so I’m on my way home from the store, because we’re out of beer again, because Steve was supposed to go get more and he didn’t, the dickhead–and what happens? Well, obviously, because this worthless excuse of a city can’t be bothered to keep the roads clear, I drive right through a patch of broken glass and BANG! Blow a tire. Swear to God, I thought it was a gunshot, I nearly ran my car into a telephone pole.” If all your characters sound alike or sound like the narrator or (worse) sound like you, it’s time to stop and reevaluate. 
  6. Characters don’t speak for you. Look, unless you’re writing a really boring story it’s going to have a bunch of people in it with a bunch of different ideas and some of them should believe things that you don’t agree with or speak in a way you find objectionable. Characters are sometimes going to have to say things you find morally deplorable and they have to say them with conviction. I recently wrote a scene where my FMC’s boyfriend and her dad argue about what they’re going to do about her, like she’s not a grown-ass woman who can take care of herself. And they both say things that are utterly atrocious and that if I heard a man say in real life, I would probably punch him in the face. But that’s important. In fiction, you gotta tell it all and tell it like it is. Fiction isn’t true but it should be honest. Not every character can agree with you or with each other. (This is a big part of the reason that authorial intent is a flawed concept. An author who depicts something isn’t necessarily condoning or endorsing it.) You should be writing about difficult shit and writing about it from every vantage point and using dialogue to do that. You don’t need to agree with angelic equality crusader Nancy and homophobic Uncle Jeff equally but they need to be equally convincing. Write disagreements. Write arguments. Let characters fight and get pissed and tell each other to fuck off. It’s honest, and it’s interesting. Conflict is good.
  7. Incomplete sentences are your best friend. So are run-ons. That scene I mentioned that was 25 lines with no speaker tags? There’s also not a complete sentence in that whole exchange. We rarely speak in full correct sentences, even if we know perfectly well that what we’re saying isn’t grammatically perfect. So something like this: 
            “Seen my keys?”
            “In the basket.”
    Totally acceptable. People are lazy. They talk in fragments. Dialogue doesn’t have to be correct, because it often isn’t. Stick commas and dashes wherever the fuck you want to mimic the pattern of speech. Worry about what’s natural, not what’s correct. Sometimes what goes unsaid is just as interesting as what does get said. For instance, if Joe turns to Carol and starts to say, “Have you ever thought about–” and then never finishes the sentence, that’s going to keep a reader wondering. Has she ever thought about what? In much the same way, you can have a character ramble for an entire paragraph in an epic run-on sentence if that’s the way they talk, or if they’re distressed or upset and trying to get the words out. The last book I finished has a chapter at the end where one character literally talks without interruption for nine pages. And as insane as that sounds it’s actually totally necessary because she’s telling a story that’s important for the readers and the other characters to hear but it’s a hundred times better to hear it in her own voice, grammatical correctness be damned.
  8. Don’t try too hard to be eloquent. How many people do you know in real life who spout off perfectly articulate declarations of their feelings? Probably none. They ramble and stall and repeat themselves. Real-life conversations are not movie conversations. They’re not smooth. They’re not perfectly timed. A character just saying “Fuck me” because they have no idea what else to say is perfectly plausible (and also a great opportunity for comedy). Here’s an exercise if you’re having trouble: Make two columns on a page, and on one side write out what this character is trying to say (i.e, “I love you.” “I’ve been trying to tell you for years.” “But I’m afraid you don’t want me to.”) and on the other write out what they actually say (i.e., “I really hope you’ll stay.” “You know you’re always welcome to stay.” “I don’t want you to feel like you have to stay. Just that you can. If you want to.”) Sometimes the juxtaposition between what we’re trying to say and what actually comes out is so important. So don’t worry about perfect articulation or doing justice to the “emotional burden.” Worry about the intent and the impact and how those two things align–or don’t.
  9. Read it out loud. This is one of the most important things teachers in playwriting workshops will tell you to do. Read it out loud. If it feels awkward or unnatural, it probably is. Thus also to dialogue in prose fiction. Even better option? Get a couple of friends to read it for you. This will work wonders for helping you figure out what feels awkward.
  10. HAVE FUN WITH IT. When I say dialogue is far and away my favorite thing to write, I’m not kidding at all. You can learn so much about a character or how two characters interact by how they talk to each other. Do they tease, do they nag, do they finish each other’s sentences? Do they use slang, do they slur, do they talk about celebrities they’ve never met as if they’ve known them for years and they’re the best of friends? Let their personalities shine through, because when characters speak is the only time they’re not getting filtered through a narrator, even if that narrator is themselves. Dialogue provides some of the most poignant moments of characterization you’ll ever get. So play with it. Try the same line fifty different ways until it feels right. Let your characters speak for themselves.

Good luck! Go forth and write great dialogue and have a blast doing it.

Advice to Baby Witches

Here’s some things I wish someone told me when I was first starting out

  • You’re gonna find a lot of sources that are Wiccan. So if you don’t want to follow Wicca, it might be harder to find things that talk from a non- Wiccan perspective. This is not the only perspective. I encourage you even if you are wanting to follow Wicca to seek out specifically non-Wiccan sources to get a different view point. (nothing against Wicca here; I just think it’s healthy to get differing opinions)


  • It’s still witchcraft even if it doesn’t look like what books/Internets witchcraft looks like. Remember that:
    1. Everyone has a different way of doing things and your craft will never ever be the same as anyone else’s.
    2. The people posting about what witchcraft they’ve done are most of the time showing a perfected version of it. You are just starting out. You should not hold yourself up to the standards of people who have had more time and practice.
    3. It’s actually good that it doesn’t look like anyone else’s because that means that it’s entirely your own.
  • I know it can feel very daunting first getting involved in witchcraft because there is so much to learn. Trust me, you cannot learn everything, and that is okay.


  • Take things step by step. Find something that really excites you. For example, say you are really interested in deity worship. Focus on just that first. Research different deities and meditate on the ones that interest you. Once you feel like you’ve learned enough (you don’t have to be an expert by any means, just to a point where you feel like you have your foot in the door) then you can move on to something else. You don’t have to do it this way, but I found it helped me narrow things down.


  • The idea that “if you don’t know what your doing with witchcraft it can backfire” is a myth. Don’t be afraid to explore, learn new things. That being said, I wouldn’t recommend doing anything outside your skill level either. Maybe save the big deal curses for when you have a good grasp on them. Listen to your intuition on this one, if you feel like something you’re doing is too much for you, don’t do it right away, but work your way up. Don’t give up on it, either. Like I said, if you feel like you don’t have the ability to do something, get to a point where you do.


  • You will have thoughts like “this won’t work” “you’re being stupid” “it’s just some *conventionally useless item*, that can’t do ANYTHING” this is okay. Any intrusive thoughts that tell you it’s not going to work are fine, especially if you are mentally ill. It does not mean your magic looses it’s power because you had an intrusive thought. Yes, the best way to make your magic work is to believe it will work, but intrusive thoughts will not automatically stop the magic from working. Just try your best to overcome them, whatever technique you have for that will work fine. I always use my inner voice to talk back to my intrusive thoughts and say something like “What? That doesn’t even make sense! You’re being ridiculous, random voice in my head that has no attachment to me.” and try to ignore it. Your mental illness does not make you a less powerful of a witch, remember that.


  • You are much more powerful than you realize. Own this. Be empowered by it.


  • You don’t have to have a whole bunch of extravagant altars and read your tarot cards and meditate every day to be considered a ‘real’ witch. You do magic without even realizing it sometimes. It’s sometimes hard to do anything big because of busy schedules/low spoons/being closeted or whatever. Try and incorporate little things in your daily routine. I did this by Stirring my tea clockwise and focusing on the cup, while repeating “this tea will improve my day” in my head. It works great for practicing putting your intent in things, focusing your energy, and it can even work if you live in an unfriendly witch household! Get creative with the little things you can do everyday. And even if you can’t do those things sometimes, don’t worry about it!


  • Be very careful about cultural appropriation in your practice. It can get very dicey as to what is offensive to include in your practice and what is not. I can tell you straight up right now that anything taken from a Native American culture is not okay to incorporate in your practice. A very popular thing that’s taken from Native American culture is smudging. Don’t smudge. There are many alternatives to this. That being said, some things are ok to take from other cultures because those cultures aren’t practiced by living people/are part of a culture or religion that is open to outsiders taking it. Don’t bat yourself up for doing something then finding out it was offensive, because when you recognize it then take necessary steps to fix it, that’s you growing as a person and is a positive change. If you aren’t sure if what your doing is cultural appropriation, ask yourself:


    1. Is what I’m doing practiced by a group of people today? if yes, you’re in the danger zone, but it does not  necessarily mean it is appropriation
    2. Is the religion that it comes from a closed or open religion? (this means is it ok for outsiders, people who do not follow the religion, to practice it. example-Judaism=closed, wicca=open) If closed, it’s probably appropriation.
    3. Am I apart of a race that has a history of oppressing this group of people? If yes, you might want to be cautious about it.
    4. If it is deity related- Do the deities in question give me permission? if no, then definitely do not do it.
    5. What would a person from that religion/culture think if they saw me doing this? If they would not like it, it might not be okay.
    6. Is this from my heritage/ancestral background? Don’t worry too much if the answer is no but you passed most of the other questions, This one is mostly because if you grew up in a Jewish/Catholic/Muslim/other closed religion household, wanting to incorporate that in your practice is ok.


  • You do not have to be religious to practice witchcraft. Your craft can exclude deity work of any kind.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask what you feel are stupid questions. If your really scared, google is a very handy tool and most blogs have that anon option for a reason. :p

Mmk, spoons are low. Feel free to add any advice you think I’m missing. I really hope this helps someone!

we also need to talk about what magnus’ spellbook implies which is that he’s singlehandedly created hundreds if not thousands of spells and that these are spells unique to him. meaning he’s the only one who can both cast and undo them, except for what he may have chosen to share to a select few. and that these are likely the spells warding the Institute, but not only that, the Clave is probably relying on many other spells he’s created.

basically what i’m saying is magnus bane has the greatest insurance policy ever because if he goes, all of his spells go with him.

im watching fucking… ghost hunter shows bc my life is a mess but i can’t stop thinking (and laughting) about like gansey and co. being on one 

imagine like some ghost hunter group want to talk to ppl in henrietta about findings etc and they find gansey and they love him bc the ENTIRE TIME gansey is talking there are CRAZY EVP readings and chilly air and the cameras fucking up and flaring and the crew is totally freaked out the entire time  but like its just noah, sitting behind gansey and saying stupid shit and howling

“maybe i have my own personal ghost i never knew about,” says gansey in his best gentleman’s voice

imagine gansey is walking them down the monmouth stairs and noah just tosses a fucking book at them. they are THRILLED.

blue cant stop laughing while she tries to talk about her moms business because noah keeps making faces and climbing onto gansey’s back and gansey is just.. trying to look unaffected by it

adam freaks the crew out too much for them to talk to him for very long at all like they are literally more comfortable with ghosts than this boys unsettling expression 

when they ask ronan he tells them to eat shit and looks right at noah while he says ghosts aren’t real

noah’s laughter is caught on tape and ronans bit actually ends up being the highlight of the show

random aus i havent seen
  • ‘you are sitting next to me at the doctors watching me freak out. oh, i just am deathly afraid of needles and need to get a shot’ AU

  • ‘i’m a librarian and i see you have a bunch of books about depression and suicide in your hand, hey buddy, want to talk to someone? i’m here if you need me’ AU

  • ‘you are talking to yourself in a silent library about how much you hate studying and how you are going to fail. need help there? i just so happen to major in that subject. oh shit, you’re really cute’ AU

  • ‘you play guitar every day during our lunch hour and no one knows what song it is but I do and i love that band, lets talk about how amazing they are.’ AU

  • ‘i have a garage sale every year at the same time and you always show up but never buy anything and just flirt with me but i have never seen you any other place’ AU

  • ‘i’m in a band and i jumped into the crowd but no one caught me and i accidentally crushed you oh my god im so sorry here come backstage to rest. wow, you’re actually really cute’ AU

  • ‘you’ve been in Bed, Bath and Body Works for hours everyday and all you do is smell everything’ AU

  • ‘i met you on social media but we both don’t speak well in each others languages, wow i really like you and need to figure this out’ AU

  • ‘i’m a guest on your talk show and you’re flirting with me, do you do this with everyone? oh your audience is swooning over us, sure, i’ll come back on your show soon’ AU

  • ‘i collect snowglobes and i just need one more from your country, you own an antique store, wanna help me find it? oh shit i forgot you don’t really speak my language’ AU

  • ‘i’m the principal of this school and you’re an administrator and you catch all the kids trying to sneak off and send them to me. i’m impressed and you’re also really hot in that vest.’ AU

  • ‘you write amazing fanfiction on tumblr and i send you anon messages everyday. oh shit, that wasn’t on anon, my cover’s blown. well, may as well message you and talk about how much i love [insert ship here]’ AU
8

Alright, sweeties! A bit of a different post from me today! I have been meaning to make this for awhile, since I haven’t seen anyone organize their grimoire the way I do, I thought this could certainly be helpful for someone!

First, let’s talk about the book itself! I don’t use a blank book or a notebook. I wanted a graph paper notebook this size, but just couldn’t find one! So, after watching this video, I was SO inspired, I could just MAKE the whole thing! So, we went out and bought a used book, a pack of graph paper and a glue stick. This was SO freeing because I make pages before I put them in, I write in pencil, then I go over it in fine Sharpie pen, erase pencil marks, and then glue the page in when I’m finished. That way, I don’t have this fear of “messing it up” (even though I think messing up things is part of the fun sometimes!).

So if you like to be organized, I might be stressing you out. I understand. Organization is something I love and need in my life. I’ve seen so many folks using binders for their grimoires, but it wasn’t my style. I wanted it to all be sort of chronological, but also organized??? My answer to this– COLOR CODING. Ever section (energy, astrology, spells, candles/incense, etc) has a different color that I make on the side facing outwards, along with the category written on the side. This way, if I’m looking for something in particular, I can flip through and find it, no problem!

Secondly, I use ENVELOPES. Alright, I love astrology. Astrology is something I want to have a lot about in my book, but also I don’t want to take it up my entire book with this. So envelopes were my answer for this! I water-colored each envelope in a color suit that felt fitting to each of the elements, and drew on the constellation, glued those bad boys in, and BAM, I have WAY more room to add things about signs because I can just stick ‘em in their designated envelopes. 

In addition, I like using/decorating with things from the internet, magazines, etc. This is YOUR book, your documentation of learning, your personal reference. Don’t be afraid to go off the ‘traditional’ leather bound, calligraphy written, beautiful grimoires if that isn’t your style! It doesn’t make it ANY less witchy or magical to use highlighters, friends! Don’t be afraid, no one can tell you what is right or wrong when it comes to YOUR grimoire!

Also, I would LOVE to see your grimoires, so tag me in your photos!! 

xoxo

Mastering yoga takes time….In the beginning I wanted too much too soon…I ended up hurting myself. You need to let your body tell you when.. Let your body guide you.  Hard work and discipline really pay off. Yoga is also about meditation. Reflecting about your life, your growth.  Its about self forgiveness and loving yourself.

I’m a woman who runs with the wolves..They represent so much of how I feel, Of what I want in life. Duality…Following your heart, gut and female intuition. Soft, wholesome girl and the wild passionate women inside..Play and love. Instinct and challenge. Home and adventure. First, I want to be able to not only live, but thrive, on my own and with someone. Being alone has a way of guiding you to those creaky, cobwebby, eggshelly places in our being. To Be in it, truly without attachment or dependency. Sharing my life with someone..being loved and love in return..also let me evolve and grow into a stronger person.  I am so thankful for the special souls in my world who have been here with me, walked this path, together, with love and respect, with complete allowance and acceptance. I am equally grateful for the lessons learnt through great heart ache and pain. Lessons I learned from immense love and passion.  This is what I know: in this life, a steady love, and a place to call home, are far more precious than any earthly possessions or wealth in this world. I will use what I have for growth, change for others and myself. My grandparents gave me that gift and I will pay it forward! I’ve been loved and left  heartbroken, alone and together…May this next chapter be one of wild love, adventure, and most of all ..home. 

Whoawhoa!

I’ve been talking about the ongoing work on this on twitter, but we’re finally in the last stages of prep and can announce it!

The Let’s Speak English Kickstarter will launch on December 26th! Boxing Day!!

I’m really excited about this!! It’s my first kickstarter, and my first proper book run of my work. Once I have all my extra copies, I can also start finally planning to return to conventions now that I’ll have something to sell again!

Just wanted to give you guys a bit of a heads up, and here’s to a great holiday season! >:0

The Writer Workout - 11 Minutes Keeping Your Word Count High and Your Calories Low

Writing is a stationary sport. And no one knows that quite like my butt.

The fact of the matter is, it’s a struggle for writers to maintain our health while also maintaining our word count. If you’re like me, you’ll be noticing your pants fit a little different after crunching for a deadline; and your back will sure let you know about it after NaNoWriMo.

We make time for writing, but working out or staying mobile is something that gets pushed to the back burner. Because, really, who wants to do that? I deserve to scroll through Tumblr a while longer or go curl up with a good book, not commit to an hour of jogging or twenty minutes of sit-ups.

Okay then, don’t commit to that.

Commit to 11 minutes.

Just. 11. Minutes.

I know, right?

I’m not talking about click-bait – there isn’t a plot twist. The only catch I could find in this workout regimen is that you have to stick to it. You don’t have to give up coffee or do a crazy amount of work or even extend the time later.

These 11 minutes can be placed before writing, during a break, or after writing; that’s the time it takes to reblog a handful of posts. You don’t even need to go to the gym or get equipment.

Hit CTRL + S on your document and step away from the writing desk for a minute to get a taste:

Step One:

  • Toe touching for two minutes

“Stand with your feet apart and your arms up. Now, bend over so that you can reach the floor with your fingertips and then rise and stretch backwards. Keep your legs straight, but do not strain.”

Step Two:

  • Sit-ups for one minute

“Lie on your back with your arms by your sides and with your feet about six inches apart. Sit up enough to enable you to see your heels. Your legs must remain straight and your head and shoulders must lift up from the floor. Return to the start position.”

Step Three:

  • Leg raising for one minute

“Lie on your front with your arms at your sides and with your palms under your thighs. Raise your head together with one leg. Return to the start position. Repeat with the other leg. Count once when the second leg is returned to the floor. Your legs must remain straight and you should lift the leg up so that it is separated from the palm.”

Step Four:

  • Push-ups for one minute

“Lie on your front with your hands placed under your shoulders and with your palms down on the floor. Keeping your knees on the floor, lift up your upper body by straightening your arms to their full extent. Bend your arms once more to lower yourself to the ground until your chest comes back into contact with the floor.”

Step Five – Only Six Minutes to Go

  • The stationary run and scissor step for six minutes

“The run: You count one step each time your left foot leaves the ground. You need to lift each foot at least four inches above the ground. Once you have counted out seventy-five steps, carry out ten scissor steps.

Scissor steps: Stand with your right leg placed forward and your other leg placed behind you. Your left arm should be extended at shoulder height forward and with your right one extended behind you. Now jump, reversing these positions.”

In 11 minutes, you have worked all the key parts of your body and now can reward yourself with Tumblr guilt-free. The FIT KIDS technique works for writers of all ages, even the fledgling ones, and is scalable to suit whatever level you’re at.

You can buy it at Amazon HERE to get more exercise techniques, charts explaining the workout in more detail, and tips on how to even get kiddos to jump in after your nap-time writing sprint if you’re a parent.

Do it to stay healthy; do it to get stronger and faster just like your characters; or do it so you can have an extra donut as a writing reward. I know that’s why I’m doing it.

Usually I don’t do this, but can we talk about Netflix’s ‘A Series Of Unfortunate Events?’

The cast is so, sooo diverse and I’m so glad the team tried to make something different for a change, especially Uncle Monty, who’s a sweeiet!

Also, one of Olaf’s henchman is a person of inderteminate gender, which is amazing. I also loved the Fourth Wall breaking because that’s a classic and overall the series is just like the book. so frick me sideways. NPH is a good Olaf and seriously, I haven’t watched a single work from him before (yes, not even How I Met Your Mother), but he’s killing it with this role! Such an evil and yet interesting Count Olaf. 

Not only that, everyone can see how the writing team have modified some quotes to fit our “Era” and how they talked about patriarchy and so on. Lovely take on such a “90′s classic” and I definitely want more. 

Looking out for students

It’s really easy for me to get frustrated with my undergrads, especially now that I teach over a hundred in a week. At my core I am an introvert, though I have a distant background in performance so when I’m in front of people I want to go all out, which exhausts me and makes me grumpy real quick. I get irritated when they’re late (which is fair, they need to be on time), their constant questions run me ragged when I literally just talked about this in the lecture, and when they don’t have their lab book by week 2? Come on now!

I have one student who checks all of these boxes. We’re supposed to give zeroes for being late, and not having the lab book on the second week should be a zero too.  He’s a really nice kid though, respectful and apologetic, and seems to be pretty smart. So I asked why he didn’t have his book yet. It’s only $12.50 at the bookstore. He said he was waiting to get paid before he could buy it.

No way is a nice, smart kid going to get a zero in my lab just because he couldn’t afford a book. I sought out a spare copy for him and told him to not be late to lab again. 

Fellow instructors, look out for your students. Don’t be another cog in the system that screws the vulnerable (this student is also black). And students, please talk to us! I know this stuff is hard to talk about, but if you don’t we might just assume you’re a slacker. I don’t like to assume the worst about people. I don’t get any joy out of penalizing students for blowing off lab. I want you to learn from me, and I will do everything I can to make it accessible to you.

I won’t pretend I solved all of this student’s problems, or that I deserve a Gold Star in Allyship. The least I could do was to not be complicit. The best we all can do is recognize moments like these and make the right choice.

Okay, can we TALK ABOUT MAGNUS’S DESK FOR A SECOND???

Like yeah, the Malec is cool but I want to scream about this desk until I die. At first glance, it looks very mid-century. Old books, fancy wooden writing desk. Then you look closer and you realize how perfectly Magnus it is. Like on top of this old desk, with antique books is a glaring (almost surprisingly) modern metal lamp. 

Then, the chair. You expect an old fashioned, high-backed chair to go with the already antique feel of the room/desk. What you get? A bright yellow, almost 70′s style chair. And it’s just so perfect?? Because this is who Magnus is, ya feel. He’s this incredible mixture of things he’s taken to and enjoyed over centuries, he’s not static at all. But he also doesn’t leave behind things he cares about, he likes that desk, he likes those books but he ALSO likes that lamp and chair. Like, UGH, even his little pen which is sticking out of an antique pen holder in the center of the desk contrasts the cup of pens he has to the right of that. Like… Jesus, I love him so much. 

you know what I’d love to see? alec and magnus just sitting together and chatting. not talking about the war that’s going on or the institute or demons or any of that. I just want to see the two of them hanging out and discussing how their day was or what movie they want to watch or sharing their favourite memories and funny stories and asking each other what their favourite food and colour and book is. I would just love to see alec and magnus be completely mundane and just connect and have a good time and laugh with one another