i just choose a few that i liked the design of

It’s early in the morning and nobody will probably read this but I just had the greatest ‘humans are space orcs’ idea

Imagine if humans are the only species that experiences impatience.

Think about it. Most prey animals are extremely patient. Ever meet a deer or a rabbit in the woods and hold still to try and out-wait the thing? I can guarantee your brain starts sending bored bored bored messages very quickly, and your instincts start telling you to give up and find something else to do. Humans can do the patience thing- as evidenced by our endurance hunting methods- but our instincts tell us not to. Correct me if I’m wrong, but this feels like a predator development. I have the idea that if aliens are mostly prey-based, and we’re predator-based, then the aliens will be very patient and we just aren’t.

As an evolutionary development, being impatient can be brilliant. It means that we didn’t sit around and wait for the ice caps to warm up, we knew we didn’t have the technology to survive that level of cold, but we did it anyways. We were trying to send people into the sky and then into space before we had fully figured it all out, simply because we didn’t want to wait and think it out, we wanted SPACE and we wanted it NOW. And personally, I tend to be extremely productive and inventive when I’m feeling impatient. Mechanic is booked for a few days? I’ll figure out how to change my oil and tires and tint my car’s windows myself. Strawberry season is still 4 months away? I’ll get a heat lamp setup and grow them myself. Friends can’t visit and help move furniture for a week? I’ll build a trolley out of some toy cars, tape, a chessboard, and do all the lifting myself.

This impatience is what made us design faster cars, faster computers, faster internet, faster communication, methods of growing food faster, of processing food faster, we’re always looking for the quickest and most efficient thing simply because we are not patient. 

Impatience leads to a type of creativity and persistence that patience just doesn’t have.

Imagine aliens starting to realize this.

“You got to your moon before you had developed LED screens??? You didn’t even have computers that could do basic math?!”
“Well, what else were we gonna do, sit around and wait?”

“Your planes don’t have gravitational control? Don’t you experience discomfort from the acceleration and directional changes?”
“Sure. But we needed to get on the other side of the planet in a decent amount of time.”
“So… what you’re articulating is that you’d rather have physical distress than have to have a long journey?”
“Yeah, pretty much.”

“Human____, our mechanical teams will be on site in several of your earth hours, so we won’t be going anywhere until then.”
“Screw that. Where’s the manual for this thing? I bet I can fix it.”
“But you don’t have any mechanical training.”
“I also don’t feel like sitting around on this rock for ages.”

“You’re back already? I thought your medical representative told you to not be walking on that limb for another of your weeks.”
“Ugh. I just can’t anymore. I’ve got to get up and move and do something, anything.”
“But doesn’t that hurt to walk on?”
“Absolutely.”
“…You would choose pain over waiting?”
“What can I say, I’m not a patient person.”

Like aliens just being baffled that humans would rather work hard or struggle with a problem or even experience pain and discomfort. They, as prey species, are used to just waiting it out. They don’t have the same impatience driving them to get up and go and to fight through things just because they can’t wait any longer.

Bonus: 
Human: Ain’t nobody got time for that!
Alien: Why don’t you have time? Is something scheduled soon?
Human: No, I just don’t feel like wasting time.
Alien: But… it’s not wasted. It’s time well spent. And you do technically have the time to spare for that. If there’s nothing scheduled, then you do ‘got time for that’.
Human: No. No, I don’t. It’s just… no.

This is for @uncannycookie since I asked if they wanted anything and they requested something about Mob going with Teruki to get his ears pierced, so here it is!

But then I also found I wanted to do the entire scene and I didn’t have time to draw it all so… I wrote fanfiction for the first time in my entire life. Writing is very much not my forte so I hope I didn’t make too many mistakes. I just thought it was a cute fluffy scene. Ummm, I hope you like it! *screaming over writing*


“You didn’t have to come you know,” Teruki said as he opened the door, a bell gently chiming above them. “It’s going to be fairly quick to get done.” He held the door open for Mob before shutting it behind them, leaving behind a crisp Autumn day and becoming encased in the warm, dark interior of the shop.

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So you want to interact with a fanfiction author

Great! I’m glad you want to reach out and start a conversation with the many creative, giving people who take time out of their busy lives to pen the stories that have captured your imagination. This post is going to cover leaving reviews, giving constructive criticism, and a few do’s and don’t’s.

If you like a fic, leave a review! You can do this a couple different ways.

Reblogging with tags. Every single creative person I know, be they writer or artist or musician, religiously stalks the tags when people reblog their work. Tags are an amazing way to communicate with a creative, especially if you’re shy about sending them a message directly or are afraid your comment will go unnoticed in their inbox.

Don’t know what to say in the tags? Think about the moment you decided you were going to reblog this piece instead of just hitting the “Like” button. Was it a particularly well done piece of dialogue? A description that made you feel like you were a part of the story instead of just reading it? A scenario you’d never considered before but changed the way you thought about [character a, situation b, or fandom c]? There’s a reason you’re taking time to reblog instead of like, so let them know why! Not every reblog needs to be a tag flail.

Alternatively, you can send the author a message. Fanmail if you’re shy and don’t want your adoration made public. Sometimes, if I don’t have time to tag a fic the way I want for whatever reason, I’ll like the piece and then shoot the author a fanmail or an ask telling them what I liked. This is also acceptable. Who doesn’t like getting mail? Crazy people who don’t use social media, that’s who.

Ok, but wait. What if you DON’T like what the author has done with their fic? What then? Yes, there are options.

Option #1: You ignore the fic. You neither like nor reblog the story. You and the author both move on with your lives. You may choose this option at any time. It is not necessary to let the author or anyone else know you have chosen this option.

Option #2: Ask the author why they chose to go that route. Politely. We’ll go over what that means later.

Option #3: Give constructive criticism. Now. Be careful with this one. Creatives are sensitive people. Make sure the author is open to it before you go barrelling into their ask box. If you message me, even on anon, saying, “Hey, I just read your latest fic and I have some concrit I wanted to run by you. Is that ok?” that is perfectly fine. If my answer is yes, go for it. If not, see Option #1.

What is concrit? Glad you asked.

This is concrit: “I totally get the vibe you were going for with that scene, but I was a little confused about the angles of the body parts. I don’t think you meant for them to be doing xyz there. It just took me out of the moment a little.”

This is NOT concrit: “You’re actually not very good at writing smut. You should probably just let [other person] write it and stick to what you’re good at. Which is not smut.”

What’s the difference? In the first one, you acknowledge what you think the author was going for. You explain what has you confused. You explain how you interpreted it. And then you leave a way for the author to contact you to respond to the concrit. You could be right. Maybe the author’s beta was having an off day and missed that awkward elbow maneuver. Maybe they don’t have a beta.  Or maybe it’s you that’s missed something. The second example is rude. This criticism is not designed to help the author. It is designed to tear them down and discourage them.

Some people adore concrit. Some people only want it before they publish a piece. Some don’t want it at all. None of these are wrong.

SIDE NOTE FOR AUTHORS: If you ask for concrit, do not be upset, offended, or throw a tantrum when someone sends you a respectful message. You did not want concrit. You wanted to ask for concrit and revel when no one sent you anything. Those are not the same things. Concrit, when given correctly, is designed to make you, the author, a better writer.

Ok, let’s go back to Option #2 now. Where you liked the piece overall, but the characters are acting a little wonky. Something’s not quite right, you think. You don’t really have any concrit, but you want to say something. Here’s what you can do, especially if the author is posting a work in progress.

Acceptable: “Hey! I just read the latest chapter of [amazing story you’ve been following since day one]. I’m enjoying the story so far, but this last one has me a little confused. Why did [character a] do [this]? I feel they would have done [that]. Am I missing something?”

Not acceptable: “Your latest chapter was a big disappointment. I feel like you just don’t know the characters anymore. There’s no way in hell [characters a and b] would be [doing xyz]. I’m sorry, I’m unfollowing you.”

In the first example, you let the author know you like their work. You are making an attempt to understand their vision. You give them a specific example of what’s bothering you. You acknowledge that there may be things coming that you aren’t aware of yet. In the second, you’re an asshat who is wasting bandwidth. The tone has shifted from commenting on the story to commenting on the author.

And here are a few general DO’s and DON’T’S:

DO tell an author you are excited to read the next chapter.

DON’T send an author a message saying only “update soon” less than five minutes after the new chapter was posted.

DO speculate on what’s going to happen next.

DON’T tell the author how to write their story.

DO ask your author how the writing process is going.

DON’T ask your author why they haven’t updated yet.

DO send your author love.

DON’T send your author anon hate.

THERE ARE NO PROFESSIONAL FANFICTION AUTHORS. (We’re not gonna talk about she-who-must-not-be-named of the fifty shade variety). Every single fic author has a job, family, friends, school, religion, other hobbies, or sleep equally vying for their attention. Respect their time, respect their work, respect them as human beings, and we’ll all get along fine.

Bruise [ II ]

Genre [Rating] : Angst [M]

Length: 10.3k

Pairing: Chanyeol x Reader

Summary: He wasn’t yours, and you weren’t his, but that couldn’t stop your heart from believing otherwise.

Bruise Masterlist

Originally posted by pcycho61

The cool air whipping at your skin made a shiver spread along your spine, hands rubbing at your biceps as your teeth chattered behind your pressed together lips. Loud laughter and screams filled the air, the night lit up by warm orange hues of carnival rides and haunted houses. Your feet felt stiff, trapped in a pair of uncomfortable sneakers you regretted wearing, eyes glued to the back of Minseok’s head as he told your friends something apparently hilarious. It was far too cold out to be stuck in a stupid line for a stupid haunted house in a tank top and torn up skinny jeans. You were too annoyed to continue being stuck in front of Chanyeol and Sehun as they flirted with a group of girls behind you, Chanyeol’s cologne wafting to your nose whenever he moved his arms about.

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Important Quotes from GRRM

“Some people I met thought we have to find the story’s through line. Who’s the important character? Somebody thought that Dany’s the important character – cut away everybody else, tell the story of Dany. Or Jon Snow. Those were the two most popular characters to build everything around, except you’re losing 90 percent of the story. “ - Rollingstone 2014

“[T]hey couldn’t get a handle on the size of the material, the very thing that I set out to do. I had all these meetings saying, “There’s too many characters, it’s too big — Jon Snow is the central character. We’ll eliminate all the other characters and we’ll make it about Jon Snow.” Or “Daenerys is the central character. We’ll eliminate everyone else and make the movie about Daenerys.” And I turned down all those deals.” -Time Magazine 2017

These two quotes are probably the most important quotes from George because he plainly states that the story is not just about Jon/Dæny. George narrows them down to being only 10% of the story. Are they important? Yes. But so are a host of other characters.


“So all that time I thought Gandalf was dead, and now he’s back and now he’s Gandalf the White. And, ehh, he’s more or less the same as always, except he’s more powerful. It always felt a little bit like a cheat to me. And as I got older and considered it more, it also seemed to me that death doesn’t make you more powerful. That’s, in some ways, me talking to Tolkien in the dialogue, saying, “Yeah, if someone comes back from being dead, especially if they suffer a violent, traumatic death, they’re not going to come back as nice as ever.“ That’s what I was trying to do, and am still trying to do, with the Lady Stoneheart character.” - Time Magazine, 2017

Death does not make you stronger or nicer. Applying this to Jon, he is not the same and never will be.


“At some points, when [Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss] and I had discussions about what way we should go in, I would always favor sticking with the books, while they would favor making changes,” he said. “I think one of the biggest ones would probably be when they made the decision not to bring Catelyn Stark back as Lady Stoneheart. That was probably the first major diversion of the show from the books and, you know, I argued against that, and David and Dan made that decision.” - Time Magazine, 2017

Leaving Lady Stoneheart out was something George feels is a big mistake, we can assume that Lady Stoneheart is integral to the storyline in the unreleased books.


"It was the summer of 1991. I was still involved in Hollywood. My agent was trying to get me meetings to pitch my ideas, but I didn’t have anything to do in May and June. It had been years since I wrote a novel. I had an idea for a science-fiction novel called ”Avalon. I started work on it and it was going pretty good, when suddenly it just came to me, this scene, from what would ultimately be the first chapter of A Game of Thrones. It’s from Bran’s viewpoint; they see a man beheaded and they find some direwolf pups in the snow. It just came to me so strongly and vividly that I knew I had to write it. I sat down to write, and in, like, three days it just came right out of me, almost in the form you’ve read.”- Rollingstone, 2014

The Starks sparked the idea, and are at the very root of the story, but not the entire story. This also emphasizes that this book is not just about a bastard and dragon. +Bran is important, though the show fails to portray this.


“You have to remember that I started writing this story in 1991 and I first met David and Dan in 2007. I was living with these characters and this world for 16 years before we even started working on the show. They’re pretty fixed in my mind and I’m not going to change anything because of the show, or reaction to the show, or what fans think. I’m just still writing the story that I set out to write in the early 1990s.- Time Magazine, 2017

Self-explanatory.


I think there are two types of writers, the architects and the gardeners. The architects plan everything ahead of time, like an architect building a house. They know how many rooms are going to be in the house, what kind of roof they’re going to have, where the wires are going to run, what kind of plumbing there’s going to be. They have the whole thing designed and blueprinted out before they even nail the first board up.”

The gardeners dig a hole, drop in a seed and water it,“ he told the Guardian. "They kind of know what seed it is, they know if [they] planted a fantasy seed or mystery seed or whatever. But as the plant comes up and they water it, they don’t know how many branches it’s going to have, they find out as it grows.-2011, The Guardian

“In the case of any of my novels, I know where I’m starting from, I know where I want to end up, more or less,” he said. “I know some of the big turning points along the way, the stuff I’m building for, but you discover an awful lot along the way. Characters rise up and seem more important, and you get to what you’d thought was going to be a big turning point and… the thing you’d thought about two years ago doesn’t really work as well, so you have a better idea! There’s always that process of discovery for me. I know not all writers work that way, but it’s always been the way I work.” -Time Magazine, 2017

Putting these quotes together because they’re implying similar things. 

George has a view of where he’s going but that doesn’t mean things can’t be reimagined. For an example, George’s original outline is almost completely different from the books we have now, but a few parts of the outline are still there, but taking shape in different characters.


I did consider in the very early stages not having the dragons in there. I wanted the Targaryen’s symbol to be the dragons, but I did play with the notion that maybe it was like a psionic power, that it was pyrokinesis — that they could conjure up flames with their minds. I went back and forth. My friend and fellow fantasy writer Phyllis Eisenstein actually was the one who convinced me to put the dragons in, and I dedicated the third book to her. And I think it was the right call.” -2017 Meduza


“In some senses, Theon is struggling all the way through to be a hero. They both come out of the same situation: they’re both raised in Winterfell by Eddard Stark, but they’re not part of the real, core family. Theon is a ward, and Jon Snow is a bastard son. So they’re both a little outside, but Jon handles this successfully, and Theon fails to handle this. He is poisoned by his own envy and his sense of not belonging.” -2017 Meduza

This quote brings the Season 7 scene with Jon and Theon to mind. Theon tells Jon that he always made the right decision, while Theon made the wrong decisions (choosing the Greyjoys over the Stark family that raised him). Jon will make the right decision.


“So many readers were reading the books with so much attention that they were throwing up some theories, and while some of those theories were amusing bulls— and creative, some of the theories are right. At least one or two readers had put together the extremely subtle and obscure clues that I’d planted in the books and came to the right solution." -The Telegraph, 2014

Extremely Subtle and obscure hints; George’s bittersweet ending will not be predictable. Only a few people have figured out the ending. If your predicted ending involves ultimate good (humans) vs ultimate evil (others), you already lost.

Major Key Alert: The Perfect Shave

Summer is just under one month away and many of us who have been hibernating in all regards are elated to start the Summer ‘16 festivities. We’re taking the word of many fine people all over and saying if your hibernation includes a complete obliteration of the word “shaving” from your vocabulary, we have you covered. We’ve compiled our best kept secrets for the finest shave that you’ll ever know but we’d also like to give you a fair warning… you will not be able to stop feeling your legs, these tips leave your skin so soft, it’s almost unapproachable. 

Myths Debunked!

1) It’s a common myth that not shaving for a period of time until just prior to needing to shave, will result in maximum smoothness, this is entirely incorrect. The faster you get into the habit of shaving, the smoother your legs, arms, etc. will be. So if you have a date, party, seance, make sure you start several days before to ensure the smoothest shave when it is really necessary. 

2) Shaving with Oil - yes, we fulllllllllyyy recommend shaving with oil but this needs to be expanded on just a tad. Per our experience and we’ve tried every oil under the sun (coconut, argan, rosehip, olive, castor, you name it!) Extra Virgin Olive Oil is the absolute crème de la crème of oils to shave with. Not only is EVOO the most hydrating for us but it also for some reason leaves us completely smooth longer. Our great Aunts to our best friends have aggrandized coconut oil for every use under the sun but we’re telling you; EVOO leaves us smooth for 3-4 days while coconut oil is a mere 1-2 days, tops! 

ALSO, on the topic of oil, it’s extremely tricky to shave with but here’s a no frills account of how we do:

-Pour about 1/4c of EVOO in a container and place in shower with you. 

-Allow the steam of the shower to soften your hair follicles for at least 5 minutes. 

-Once your skin is feeling supple, take a quarter size amount of oil into your hands and massage it onto your leg for around 2 minutes (or whichever body part you’re shaving, just make sure to massage each body part in between shaves i.e. massage oil into left leg, shave left leg, then repeat steps for each body part of your choosing.)

- When the leg is coated, rinse your razor and begin shaving against hair growth, making sure to rinse the razor head completely every 2-3 swipes to prevent clogging. 

MAKE SURE TO KEEP THE SKIN COMPLETELY MOISTURIZED WHILE SHAVING! IF YOU’RE NOT THE QUICKEST SHAVER, NO WORRIES. JUST MAKE SURE TO RINSE THE SKIN EVERY FEW SWIPES! 

Skin that is not adequately dampened is the #1 cause for nicks while shaving. 

Once done go ahead and massage the remaining oil into the skin, you’ll be a walking heart-eye emoji for the next couple of days. After leaving the shower, we like to moisturize again with our Leighis Butter for an absolute goddess radiance.

3) Ingrown Hairs and Itchiness after Shaving. To prevent ingrown hairs and itchiness after shaving, we recommend two things. One- Use a toner over shaved areas after shaving. We recommend Witch Hazel or your own DIY Sea Salt Toner or ACV toner, just send us an ask if you need the recipe. Two- Exfoliate! We dry brush 3 times a week at least to keep the dead skin at a minimum. We also whip up a quick Pineapple Mask that we use over our entire body as a chemical exfoliant which we prefer over scrubs. Shaving also helps to remove dead skin, so the more you do it (as long as it’s in a hygienic, safe fashion) the less issues you’ll have with ingrown hairs and itchiness. 

4) Men razors give a closer shave than women razors. I believed this for so long! My absolute favorite razor was the Gilette Fusion, my step-dad had purchased a bulk of them from Sam’s Club and I was completely hooked for years until trying my favorite now, the Schick Hydro Silk which has the smoothest glide ever! We’ve done our research, Gilette uses the same razor blades for their men and women lines and we’ve read that it mostly comes down to the angle of blade, the curvature of the razor head, and the handle as a whole. Overall, we like that women’s razors are designed for the hair on our most commonly shaved areas (i.e. legs, bikini, and underarms) so we’re voting Women’s over men’s any day but we implore you to experiment for yourself. We just recommend a razor of quality with at least 4 blades, the Schick Hydro Silk and the Gilette Fusion both have 5 and that you change the razor head as soon as it dulls.

Here’s just a few more pointers:

- There’s no need to push down hard when shaving! Simply glide the razor over the skin in straight, controlled strokes. 

- Shaving with oil is going to extend the life of your razor, which is great for your bank account and no more poisonous shaving creams but you’ll have to spend a few more minutes cleaning the razor. After each use, we rinse our razor head, soak it in an alcohol solution for a few minutes, then take a cotton swab with alcohol, and dab it clean. This is necessary and will prevent infection just in case of a nick.  

- If you do happen to cut yourself while shaving, just rinse with cold water, cleanse with hydrogen peroxide, treat with Neosporin, and cover with a cool bandaid (recommend: Spongebob or the Simpsons [our aura is Yellow])

Lastly, if you’re feeling fancy, soak in a warm bath tub enchanted with a natural bath bomb, we use the Leighis Goddess Bath Velvets  to start a really penetrative moisture. These bath velvets are no joke when comes to moisturizing so much so that the oil isn’t even necessary but we use it anyway. After daydreaming in the tub for around 20 minutes, we feel our legs, ascend to heaven, come back, shave, ascend again then moisturize once more. But this is almost lethal luxury! We reserve it for birthdays, Christmas, and every Thursday because Treat. Yo. Self. 

We hope this helps! Thanks for reading, our ask is open for advice! 

With so much love and so much light,

Curly Leighis 

Things I learned in my first year of college

This is more for my reference than anything else, but if you find this info helpful then cool. The ones with *** are the one I found most important or didn’t find on the internet when I was looking for tips. 

  • ***Your feet will hurt from walking around so much. Don’t bother getting new shoes to cope because by the time you break those in you’ll be used to walking around. Save that money for food. 
  • ***Go to career fair. You’ll probably not get the internship or job your first year, but at least you’ll know how to dress yourself, research companies, and present yourself. 
  • Go to club meeting where a company rep is present. Company reps have insane memory. They’ll remember you. Especially if you go see them every time. Helpful for when you’re applying.
  • Get a foam mattress topper
  • Don’t have a crush. You’ll waste so much time thinking about it it’s not even funny. 
  • Make friends. Make connections. Have fun. Get lit (safely).
  • Always plan your safe ride home or you’ll spend $56.50 on an uber at 3 am. 
  • Use the free bus rides you get with your tuition. 
  • Always ask for student discounts. 
  • ***Don’t just do academics. Having a 4.0 is cool and all, but no company or grad school wants you if that’s the ONLY thing you did. 
  • ***Be busy. When you’re busy, you manage your time better and be more productive instead of procrastinating because “oh that test is in like a week and I have nothing to do besides that so I’ll do it later.” 
  • ***Know your limits. You can’t handle being actively involved in 5 clubs and school. You’ll kill yourself in the process. Limit yourself to 3 clubs because it only gets harder from here.
  • Join clubs. Find something besides just academics that peaks your interests. It’ll make you a better student and expand your views. 
    • Join one fun club like a sorority and one serious club like business council. 
  • Work out. You’ll gain weight if you don’t. Set a routine in the summer so you can follow during the year when things get busy. 
  • Be safe. Let’s be real, it’s college and there’s drugs and alcohol everywhere. If you choose to do it, be safe about it. Here’s some safety tips. 
    • Always use a condom. Get them free from your university health center. 
    • If you’re gonna drink for the first time, do it at home or somewhere that you are comfortable and know 
    • If you’re gonna do drugs, again do it at home or a safe environment 
    • Don’t ever leave your open drink unattended. Get a new one if you do. 
    • You know when someone is sleazy or creepy. Stay away. If they’re persistent, give a fake name or number, get some random girls to let you (Oh jessica we’re leaving lets go), or straight up get away 
    • Never go somewhere alone at night. Even if you have pepper spray. 
  • Visit your family at least twice a semester if you can. They miss you and do a lot for you. Go visit them. I visited mine once a month because empty nest syndrome is real. 
  • Don’t study where your friends are. You’ll get distracted because when it’s 3 am and your getting sick of studying, procrastinating with friends seems super fun. 
  • ***Study with a group. Sounds counter intuitive considering my last tip, but for things like ochem, engineering classes, business projects, or whatever, the classes are designed that if you don’t work in groups you will fail. Find a group of people/friends that are actually productive for studying and stick with it. Form a study squad. Join with other squads from time to time. 
  • Don’t eat out a lot. You’ll get fat and broke.
  • Drink lots of water. Refillable water bottles ftw. 
  • Get off your phone in class. No you can’t pay attention and listen at the same time. 
  • Email your professors. Go to extra review sessions. When you’re .04 off from getting an A this will help you. 
  • ***ONLY go to TA sessions if they grade the work and/or actually help you learn. Some TA’s are garbage because they’re required to do it for grad school. But they grade your stuff and if you’re one the few people who’s name they know, that’ll definitely help you. If you learn nothing from them and they don’t grade your stuff, don’t waste your time. 
  • Sleep. That all nighter is worse for you than not knowing anything. Cram the best you can and at least get 3 hours. 
  • Save your notes. You’ll never know when you’ll need it, if your friend needs it, or sell it. 
  • ***Use a notebook. Don’t write notes on loose leaf paper. You’ll lose track of it. If you take notes on a laptop, use onenote or something idk I have math and science notes, I can’t take that on a laptop. 
  • If you’re business or something along the line of that, look nice to class. Everyone else is too. Don’t have a professor notice you for your scrubbiness. Comb your hair, throw on some mascara, and wear whatever makes you feel good to class. 
  • ***If you’re stem or something like that, don’t worry to much about looking nice. Unlike business, the professor is probably dressed scrubbier than you. If you look nice, cool, you’ll get noticed for not being scrubby like everyone else. 
  • ***Have desk space. You’re gonna have your laptop, a million papers, and studying utensils out. Have the space for it so you don’t go crazy trying to look for stuff. 
  • ***Have a planner. The most important one. Whether it is hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, or whatever, have one. You have a lot of stuff to do, and you can’t remember it all. Buy one, print one, use google calender, doesn’t matter just have it.

This might not work for everyone, because some of you are these highly motivated studious students that has their life together, which is awesome please teach me your ways, but if you’re a mess like me, these are some tips I wish I found on a studyblr or college tips. 

break the ice, 1

Pairing:  jungkook x reader x jimin
Genre: sports au, hockey player jungkook & jimin, smut, comedy?, slight angst, fluff too :’)
Warnings: thigh riding, sexting, phone sex, pillow riding
Word Count:  18k
Summary:

There are three rules to become an official Puck Bunny:
1.     You have to love hockey. No exceptions.
2.     You have to had slept with at least three hockey players. Starters, no benchwarmers.
3.     And most importantly, have fun!

A/N: i wanted this to be a oneshot but i kept adding and adding more :( …
anyway… enjoy part 1!!

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21 Recommended Books for Writers

As I’ve talked about on my blog several times, an important part of growing as a writer is learning about writing. For years I’ve wanted to compile a list of writing books I’ve read, liked, and recommend. Today I’m happy to say I now have that list to add to my blog (perfect timing for anyone who likes summer reading). I’m sure over time, this list will be added to.

Many writers I’ve talked to have read quite a few of these books. How many have you read? And is there one I need to look into? (You can comment at the bottom).

If you haven’t read any of them, cool. Now you have a list to chose from should you ever want to.


Hundreds of books have been written on the art of writing. Here at last is a book by two professional editors to teach writers the techniques of the editing trade that turn promising manuscripts into published novels and short stories.

In this completely revised and updated second edition, Renni Browne and Dave King teach you, the writer, how to apply the editing techniques they have developed to your own work. Chapters on dialogue, exposition, point of view, interior monologue, and other techniques take you through the same processes an expert editor would go through to perfect your manuscript. Each point is illustrated with examples, many drawn from the hundreds of books Browne and King have edited.

BUY / LEARN MORE

What makes a good story or a screenplay great?

The vast majority of writers begin the storytelling process with only a partial understanding where to begin. Some labor their entire lives without ever learning that successful stories are as dependent upon good engineering as they are artistry. But the truth is, unless you are master of the form, function and criteria of successful storytelling, sitting down and pounding out a first draft without planning is an ineffective way to begin.

Story Engineering starts with the criteria and the architecture of storytelling, the engineering and design of a story–and uses it as the basis for narrative. The greatest potential of any story is found in the way six specific aspects of storytelling combine and empower each other on the page. When rendered artfully, they become a sum in excess of their parts.

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Bestselling author David Farland has taught dozens of writers who have gone on to staggering literary success, including such #1 New York Times Bestsellers as Brandon Mull (Fablehaven), Brandon Sanderson (Wheel of Time), James Dashner (The Maze Runner) and Stephenie Meyer (Twilight).

In this book, Dave teaches how to analyze an audience and outline a novel so that it can appeal to a wide readership, giving it the potential to become a bestseller. The secrets found in his unconventional approach will help you understand why so many of his authors go on to prominence.

  ​ BUY / LEARN MORE


How do you create a main character readers won’t forget? How do you write a book in multiple-third-person point of view without confusing your readers (or yourself)? How do you plant essential information about a character’s past into a story?

Write Great Fiction: Characters, Emotion & Viewpoint by award-winning author Nancy Kress answers all of these questions and more! This accessible book is filled with interactive exercises and valuable advice that teaches you how to:

   Choose and execute the best point of view for your story
   Create three-dimensional and believable characters
   Develop your characters’ emotions
   Create realistic love, fight, and death scenes
   Use frustration to motivate your characters and drive your story.

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The road to rejection is paved with bad beginnings. Agents and editors agree: Improper story beginnings are the single biggest barrier to publication. Why? If a novel or short story has a bad beginning, then no one will keep reading. It’s just that simple.

In Hooked, author Les Edgerton draws on his experience as a successful fiction writer and teacher to help you overcome the weak openings that lead to instant rejection by showing you how to successfully use the ten core components inherent to any great beginning.

Plus, you’ll discover exclusive insider advice from agents and acquiring editors on what they look for in a strong opening. With Hooked, you’ll have all the information you need to craft a compelling beginning that lays the foundation for an irresistible story!

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I’ve gotten quite a few asks recently wanting to know what my issue with Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition is. You’ve probably seen my grumbling about edition-warring a time or three, so I want to clarify that that isn’t where this post is going. I think 5E has a lot of fantastic ideas, and I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it to new players. The problem I have with it isn’t that I don’t like what it’s doing; it’s that I see a lot of great game design ideas lumbered by a conscious refusal to take them to their logical conclusion - or, in other words, it’s not that I think 5E goes too far, it’s that I think it doesn’t go far enough.

(Fair warning: a lot of this is going to be really jargon-heavy game design stuff that normal people probably don’t care about. That’s your cue to check out if tabletop RPG meta isn’t your cup of tea!)

To start off, there’s a concept in game design - applicable to both video games and tabletop games - called “mechanical engagement”. Basically, it’s what it sounds like: how and when the player is called upon to make rules-based decisions. Some games have high mechanical engagement, in the sense that players are given lots of rules-based “toys” to play with and expected to interact with them frequently; other games have low mechanical engagement, meaning that there are fewer rules-based “toys”, and fewer player-facing decisions about how to deploy them.

Moreover, in games that have roles or classes, different roles within the same game can offer different levels of mechanical engagement. It’s tempting to think of this in terms of low mechanical engagement = basic and low-powered, high mechanical engagement = advanced and high-powered, but this ain’t necessarily the case; you can see this phenomenon in action in the sphere of video games in, say, 2D fighters, or multiplayer online shooters. You have characters/roles with complicated and demanding execution, and characters/roles with simple and straightforward execution, and the former aren’t necessarily more powerful in practice, in spite of being more demanding to play.

The reason this happens is because a player’s preferred level of mechanical engagement is totally independent of any other axis of play (e.g., preferred role, preferred aesthetics, etc.) Some players like having lots of rules-based knobs and levers to play with, and they’ll gravitate to roles that will give them that even if there’s no actual benefit - i.e., even if it obliges them to work harder just to get to the same level as players in roles with lower mechanical engagement. Similarly, some players just want to press buttons and watch stuff explode - they prefer low mechanical engagement.

There’s nothing wrong with either preference, and one of the major perks of playing a tabletop RPG with class/role-based character creation is that it allows you to accommodate different preferences in terms of mechanical engagement within the same party. You can have players who want to juggle lists of special abilities as long as their arm, and players who just want to hit things with swords, and they can play at the same table - everybody wins. Again, remember that this is totally separate from wanting to play a “low powered” or “high powered” character; the level of mechanical engagement that a role demands is a different axis from how big its numbers are.

Now, one of the perennial issues of fantasy tabletop RPGs in general and D&D in particular is tying particular levels of mechanical engagement to particular role aesthetics. In many iterations of the game, if you want to play a role with high mechanical engagement, you have to chuck fireballs, and if you want to play a role with low mechanical engagement, you have to be a sword-slinging meat shield. A player who wants high mechanical engagement but also likes swords is liable to be told, both by the game’s text and by other players, that she’s Doing It Wrong - and so, for that matter, is a player who wants low mechanical engagement, but also wants to set stuff on fire with her brain.

(Incidentally, this is one of several areas where core-book 4E solves a real and recognised problem in the most hilariously unsubtle manner imaginable, by bashing every role into exactly the same level of mechanical engagement. Which is fantastic if that just happens to be your preferred keel, because now you can play and enjoy every role - and terrible if your ideal toybox is too much larger or smaller, because now every role is an equally bad fit for you.)

5E brings a couple of great ideas for solving this problem to the table:

1. It introduces a series of “tutorial levels”, where each class‘s abilities are introduced gradually over the levels 1-3, reducing entry barriers, leveling out the learning curve, and allowing folks to “try on” different levels of mechanical engagement more easily; and

2. It introduces system of templated archetypes whereby particular classes/roles can be “tuned” to different levels of mechanical engagement, making the same basic set of roles accessible to players with a broader range of preferences in terms of mechanical engagement - and, critically, the choice of template doesn’t have to be made until after the previously mentioned “tutorial levels” are complete.

Sounds great, right?

The problem is, it only applies to fighters and rogues and related classes. Clerics and wizards - i.e., the full-featured spellcasters - don’t get any “tutorial levels”, are obliged to choose their archetypes at first level, and all of their archetypes are about equally complicated - to the point that, for example, the lowest mechanical engagement cleric you can build has more rules-based toys you’re obliged to wrangle at any given level than the highest mechanical engagement fighter.

In other words, the game turns around and goes some distance out of its way to reinforce the very problem that this design pattern is meant to solve!

This pattern is repeated in several other places. For example, one of the long-standing disagreements among the fandom is whether D&D should primarily support epic, globe-trotting “high fantasy” or gritty, street-level “low fantasy” as its default tone. It’s as much a question of rules as it is of flavour text, so it’s hard to do both - but 5E gives it the old college try, which is a frankly fascinating decision. How does that play out?

Unconventionally, 5E does it based on character classes: you literally have some classes that are built out of high fantasy tropes, and some classes that are built out of low fantasy tropes, with the result that you can have characters who basically hail from totally different genres of fantasy fiction running around in the same party. This isn’t necessarily a bad idea; there are lots of inspirational sources that setup could describe - I mean, just look at The Lord of the Rings. If that’s not a prototypical case of high fantasy characters and low fantasy characters partying up, I’ll eat my hat.

This’d be another great opportunity for the archetype system to shine - but again, we see this obnoxious wall slamming down between “martial” and “magic” classes. This time it goes the other way: fighters and rogues default to low fantasy genre assumptions, and have access to archetype templates that can dial them up to high fantasy - but clerics and wizards default to high fantasy and don’t get anything to adjust that.

Tellingly, the high fantasy archetypes for fighters and rogues basically operate by bolting half a wizard to the side of their respective classes. You end up with a strange dynamic where some characters from a given piece of genre source material are valid inspirations, but not others - e.g., you can be Merlin, but not Lancelot; Gandalf, but not Legolas; Medea, but not Achilles. Again, we see this reactionary notion that only spellcasters are allowed to play in the big-kid sandbox; the game’s text openly acknowledges as much by flat-out stating that only full-progression spellcasters are relevant when determining which tiers of play a party can engage with. And again, the tools to fix that are right there; the game just doesn’t deign to pick them up and use them.

I could keep going, but I suspect I’ve harped on long enough that y’all get exactly where I’m coming from here. It’s like… these are not new problems. Maybe not all players care about them, but it’s nearly universally acknowledged that they exist, and it would have taken so little effort to address them - the game literally developed the perfect tools to do so, then didn’t use them. It drives me crazy to see a game come so close to what could have been a legitimately revolutionary take on the genre, then deliberately stop juuuuust short of the goal line.

Gender Identity/Term list!

This is only the first edition and I will add more! send me your terms or terms I should at the the list, through ask or submit! It’d be super helpful! Thank you!

AFAB – Assigned female at birth

AMAB – Assigned male at birth

DFAB – Designated female at birth

DMAB – Designated male at birth

CAFAB – Coercively assigned female at birth (intersex)

CAMAB – Coercively assigned male at birth (intersex)

FAAB – Female assigned at birth (commonly used for intersex as well)

MAAB – Male assigned at birth (commonly used for intersex as well)

UAAB – Unassigned at birth (rare designation, depending on physicians perception on infants genitalia)

Cisgender – Someone identifying as their assigned birth gender.

Transgender – Someone identifying outside of their assigned birth gender.

Transsexual – Someone who undergoes surgery to change their sex characteristics to match their gender.

Cis Female – A female assigned at birth identifying as a female.

Cis Male – A male assigned at birth identifying as a male.

Trans Woman – A male assigned at birth identifying as a female.

Trans Man – A female assigned at birth identifying as a male.

Intersex – A person with a mix of sex characteristics. Many intersex infants and children are subjected to numerous genital surgeries and hormone treatments in order to conform their bodies to the standard of either male or female.

Hermaphrodite – An outdated, and usually offensive term in reference to intersex folk.

Nonbinary – A female or male assigned at birth identifying as neither a female nor male.

Agender – A nonbinary term, being beyond the gender binary and just neutral.

Genderfluid – A person who identifies with a fluidity between an amounts of certain genders.

Bigender – A person who identifies with two genders. (depends on the person)

Trigender – A person who identifies with three genders. (depends on the person)

Two-Spirit – A gender among indigenous people, like bigender in definition. (Non-indigenous not to use this)

Gender Variant – Or, Gender nonconformity; Persons whose expression doesn’t follow the binary or Male/Female. Similar to nonbinary.

Transvestite – Refers to a cisgender person crossdressing.

Genderfuck – A nonbinary type term for a more aggressive ‘f you’ to the gender binary and confuse standard stereotypical gender expression.

Genderpunk – Like Genderfuck, but more alternative and like, chill about your gender.

Genderqueer – Another nonbinary type term, being inbetween, beyond, or a mix of genders.

Genderpivot – Intersection of genderfluid and bigender; one gender stays put while the other(s) fluctuates.

Pangender – Someone who identifies with all genders (A problematic term due to spiritual/culture specific genders)

Polygender – Identifying as many genders.

Multigender – Another word for “Polygender”

Androgyny – A gender expression of masculine and feminine elements; or neither. (andro-masculine gyno-feminine)

Androgyne – The gender identity version of Androgyny

Queer – A term used by individuals who choose not to designate actual labels, like an umbrella term (however some are uncomfortable with it, and it shouldn’t be forced upon others)

Third gender – Another nonbinary term for beyond the Male and Female gender.

Trans* - An attempt at an inclusive label that only ended in trans erasure of nonbinary folk as real trans people

Neutrois – Another nonbinary umbrella term like genderless or agender. (pronounced new-twa, because of its French like spelling, I believe)

Null-gender – Being agender like, but more laid back and uncaring about stereotypes.

Demigirl - Mostly identifying as female, and partially another gender.

Demiboy - Mostly identifying as male, and partially another gender.

Demigender - Mostly identifying with one gender, and partially another.

Remember, this is just a list of dictionary definitions and a few peoples view on it. Don’t let that stop you from using any of the terms in your own context!

Women In Young Adult Literature

This Wednesday we’re celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women on International Women’s Day. I’d like to use that as an opportunity to talk about a few of my favorite female characters in Young Adult books. Careful if you haven’t read these books because of possible spoilers.

Cather Avery (Fangirl)

Cather Avery and her twin sister Wren are starting college and Wren has announced she wants to discover college on her own, leaving an introvert Cath hiding out in her dorm, writing fan fiction. I really liked that Fangirl was about Cath as a character at first and everything else second. Cath is shy and introvert but she’s also sure of who she is and isn’t ashamed of that.

Madeline Whittier (Everything Everything)

Madeline has a rare illness which prevents her from leaving her house, but Maddy is a happy teenage girl. She reads a lot, takes classes online, has a friend in the form of her nurse. Despite the fact that she was missing out on so much in her life, she keeps being optimistic. It is impossible not to like her. Of course, she was also moody and curious. This curiosity eventually leads her to uncover a secret that will change everything for her.

Glory O’Brien (Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future)

One evening Glory and her best friend mix up beer with the remains of a bat (that is as weird as it sounds). Next thing they know they can see people’s pasts and futures. Glory becomes obsessed with the second civil war and decided to write down every piece of information she gathers from seeing people’s futures. I loved how Glory handled seeing the future. She questioned everything in her past and present; her future, the strange hippie community across the street and especially her mother’s suicide and what I means for her.

Rose Hathaway (Vampire Academy-series)

Rose Hathaway is a Dhampir and thus fated to guard a Moroi. She’s determined to protect her best friend Lissa, a royal Moroi. Rose is sarcastic and insubordinate but she is fiercely loyal to Lissa. Over the course of the series Rose loves and loses Dimitri. The loss of him puts her friendship with Lissa and even her life at stake.

Mara Dyer (Mara Dyer trilogy and upcoming Shaw Confessions)

She has to power to kill people with a thought, but is she a villain? Throughout this trilogy, Mara tries to figure out what is happening with her. She means no harm, but around her people start dying under strange circumstances. She tries to understand her powers and is put in dangerous situations because of it. To get herself out of these situations she must use her power and questions who she is when she does.

Gwendolyn Shepard (Ruby Red)

Kerstin Gier gives us curious and funny heroines. These characteristics often put them in complicated situations. Take Gwendolyn, (Gwyneth in the US/UK editions) for example. She can travel through time but it isn’t nearly as fun as it sounds. She always taught her cousin would inherit the time travel gene, she isn’t ready to fulfill tasks that would take her across time. Yet, Gwendolyn uncovers the truth and stands her ground while taking on an ancient organization.

Shahrzad Al-Khayzuran (The Wrath and the Dawn)

She marries the Caliph, not to love him and be his bride, but to kill him. Khalid has had countless wives and has killed every one of them, including her best friend. But when Shahrzad finds out her husband is cursed she takes it upon herself to save him and their people. Shahrzad can come across as spoiled, but she also doesn’t take shit from anyone and doesn’t like to be told what to do.

Inej Ghafa & Nina Zenik (Six Of Crows)

Inej can climb the most impossible buildings. She grew up with loving parents but was separated from them and sold to a brothel. Her time there still causes her anxiety. Nina was a member of the second army in the Ravkan war. She’s a heartrender. Nina loves her power, she loves food and she loves Matthias, who is supposed to be her enemy, and she knows he loves her too. Nina is determined to show him Grisha aren’t evil like he has been told, to not only accept her but her kind as well. Inej and Nina are just as much a part of The Dregs as the boys and just as important for their mission.

Kestrel Trajan (The Winner’s trilogy)

As the general’s daughter Kestrel knows politics very well. She has always had a privileged life. When Valorians and Herrani’s go to war, Kestrel is put in a difficult position. Her people are in the wrong, but they are her people. Arin isn’t one of them. He’s her slave, the boy she’s in love with. She has to help his people. Kestrel is often put before terrible options but they are her only options and what do you choose when the outcome is bound to be horrible either way?

Verity (Code name Verity)

“Kiss me, Hardy. Kiss me, quick!” Well, if this book didn’t destroy me. Verity is captured by Nazi’s and tortured until she agrees to write down everything she knows - everything. The first half of the book is her confession, the second half is told from her best friend’s POV. Maddie and Verity are major friendship goals. Their story was so inspiring and completely heartbreaking at the same time.

Bianca (The DUFF)

The Designated Ugly Fat Friend is what Robbie calls Bianca, explaining that it isn’t a bad thing, but it’s a fact. Bianca tries to not let this bother her, but it does. She is the DUFF. Despite the fact that he hates Robbie the two of them start a friends-with-benefits relation, except for the “friends” part because they hate each other. The book discusses many others topics, such as friendship, neglect, alcoholism and divorce. Bianca uses the words ‘slut’ and ‘whore’ a lot throughout the book. In the end, she comes to a nice conclusion about these labels and ultimately it’s a good message. I would also recommend Kody’s other YA novels.

Linh Cinder (Cinder)

So far I’ve only read the first book in the Lunar Chronicles series, but it was enough to see that Cinder is bad-ass. She’s funny and sassy and the best mechanic in New Beijing. Instead of going to the Prince’ ball she’d rather use that opportunity to elope from her evil guardian. Things don’t go as planned when it’s discovered that Cinder is a Lunar, that she has powers, and that if the Lunar queen finds out, she will take Cinder to Luna and most likely kill her.

She’s Just Not That Into You » Part IV (A Harry Styles Miniseries)

Miss the previous parts? Part One » Part Two » Part Three

Check out the inspiration behind Harry’s home here!

As always, this miniseries is dedicated to @stylesunchained. Please don’t push me into a wall or into traffic, B! Remember that I love you! Another big thank you to my expert on all-things London (and ladders), @cuddlemusclestyles.  

Let me know what you think! Happy reading. 

Originally posted by beautifulmess555

 “A pink room, huh?” Nick swirls the ice in his glass, smiling with his eyebrows raised.

“She had the same reaction,” Harry smirks, taking the last sip of his tequila. “But after she thought about it, she liked the idea. Eyes got all bright ‘n shit,” he laughs. “A pink guest room.“

“Well, if it’s what ye’ want,” the radio host clinks the rim of his glass against Harry’s. “Then ‘m ‘appy for ye’. Might ‘ave to claim it as me own when I sleep over.”

“Who says you’re invited?”

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in which jack does not, in fact, go into the NHL

AN: the sequel to this piece. 
TW: Suicidal thoughts, career changes, hard conversations.


When the confetti rained down in the other team’s colors, Jack felt a cold wave of numbness wash over him.

I don’t want to be alive anymore, he thought, chest tightening with shame and fear. I want to die.

A pause. A breath.

Oh.

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anonymous asked:

My dad says Zoo's are becoming politically incorrect. I've seen both arguments but I wanna hear your opinion on it: do you think Zoo's are a good idea?

Well, let’s see if I can keep this response short.

First, I’m guessing that by ‘politically correct’ you mean ‘ethically sound.’ So, is keeping animals in zoos an ethical thing to do? As with many things, there is no easy or even single answer to that question.

Without a doubt, there are bad zoos- private or roadside zoos, zoos that keep their animals in abhorrent conditions, zoos that allow visitors to engage in unsafe things like cub-petting schemes. It is obvious that these types of zoos are unethical and exploitative.

(Hint: something like this is never a good sign.)

On the other hand, what constitutes a ‘good’ zoo? In the best captive conditions currently available, is it okay to keep an animal locked up? Some say no, no matter what; some say what we have now isn’t good enough. Others say yes- the best zoos are able to provide their captives with good lives.

This of course brings us to just what a ‘good’ life is. Those who say that animals should never ever be placed in captivity usually value a sense of freedom above all else. Even in perfect captive conditions, an animal will not be free, wild, or ‘natural.’

However, we must acknowledge that ‘freedom’ is a concept created and defined by humans. A human locked in a prison knows the difference between captivity and freedom, and is able to conceptualize that certain ‘rights’ that they have are being violated. But for animals, this may be too complex to perceive. How far back do you have to move a fence before a kudu decides that he is wild again? The idea that animals sense when they are ‘free’ versus ‘not free’ is, to me, not realistic.

Animals do, however, benefit from the ability to be free to make choices, such as what they eat, where they will go, who they will interact with, and so on. Undeniably, captivity presents animals with fewer choices of these kinds than they would have in the wild. The best zoos are now implementing programs to accommodate these choices, particularly with highly intelligent animals such as elephants and apes.

One such example: the “O Line” at the Smithsonian National Zoo allows orangutans to choose one of two buildings to stay in during the day. Other animals, such as the otters, can choose whether or not to be on exhibit via spaces in their enclosure that are sheltered from the public. Scatter feeding and foraging enrichment is yet another way that zoos allow animals to choose what food they want to eat.

Still, despite these improvements, there will always be limitations of choice in captive environments compared to wild ones by the very definition of ‘captivity.’ Furthermore, while many strides have been taken to update enclosures with choices in mind, the fact remains that the implementation of behavioral science in zoos lags behind the research due to the costs, and often due to the stress of the animals themselves when trying to adjust to new schedules and norms (even if they are theoretically better ones).

A forty-year old captive elephant will have lived through decades of zoo reform, and we can’t erase those negative experiences from her mind.

One danger of comparing captive animals to their wild counterparts is assuming that captive environments should mirror the wild ones as closely as possible. But what the wild even is is not well-defined. ‘Wild’ deer roam my suburban neighborhood: should that habitat be replicated in their zoo enclosure? Wild environments include predators, diseases, and natural disasters: is it better that those be implemented in zoos as well?

In actuality, an animal born in captivity likely has no sense of what its natural environment should look like. Certainly it has natural instincts and inclinations- a tiger likes to urine-mark vertical objects and a gibbon likes to climb- but neither of them specifically needs a tree to do this with- a post or rope swing would also work. The ‘naturalistic’ look of many zoo enclosures is actually for the benefit of the visitors, not the animals. In fact, a lush, well-planted habitat could still be an abysmal one for an animal if all of its needs aren’t being met.

This brings us to one of the most important aspects of zoos: the visitors. Theoretically, one of the major purposes of good zoos is to educate and inspire the public about animals, particularly in regards to their conservation. But do zoos actually do this?

The answer is yes… to a small extent. People given surveys upon entering and leaving a zoo exhibit generally do know slightly more about the animals than they used to, but this depends a lot on how educated they were to begin with. While many visitors express an increased desire to engage in conservation efforts after leaving a zoo, not many of them have actually followed up on it when surveyed again a few weeks later. Still, most zoo visitors seem to leave the zoo with several positive if perhaps short-term effects: interest in conservation, appreciation for animals, and the desire to learn more. If a visitor experiences a “connection” with an animal during their visit, these effects are greatly increased.

However, certain types of animal “connections” and interactions can also produce a negative effect on zoo visitors. This reflects what I said earlier about the naturalistic design of habitats being more for the visitors than the animals. Individuals who view animals performing non-natural behaviors (such as a chimpanzee wearing clothes and acting ‘human,’ or a tiger coming up to be petted) are less likely to express an increased interest in their conservation, and even less likely to donate money towards it. Generally, our own perception of freedom and wildness matters much more than the individual animal’s.

The fact of the matter is that, worldwide, zoos spend about $350 million dollars on wildlife conservation each year. That is a tremendous amount of money, and it comes from visitors and donations. What amount of discomfort on the part of captive animals is worth that money being devoted to their wild counterparts? It’s hard to say.

This is a very, VERY general overview of some of the ethical issues surrounding zoos; to go over it all, I’d need to write a book. But hopefully, it got you thinking a little bit about what your own opinion on all this is. (I didn’t explicitly state mine on purpose, though it’s probably fairly clear.)

Refs and further reading below the cut!

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Redemption // Jeon Jungkook

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the prompt: Jungkook scenario when your pregnant unplan baby he finds the test when you get home he starts yelling, blaming you throwing things,tells you to gtfo of his life with the baby saying fucked up things. So you leave Korea 3 year later you come back with your daughter and you guys see each other again he tries to win you back angst beginning but fluff ending?

words: 8942

category: heavy angst + fluff ending

author note: it’s time to see how good destinee’s character development skills are. also y/n didn’t leave, jungkook did. hope that’s okay. im so proud of myself for writing this?? I didn’t give up and I’m glad i didn’t. anyway, this took forever to write you can literally see my writing improve as you keep reading its kind of funny anyway let’s go!

- destinee

Originally posted by sugutie

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Yuri on Ice interview translation - Animage 2017/01 (p20-23)

I was going to post this last week but gave priority to the BD stuff. This will be the final interview from the booklet that came with January Animage! There’s still an interview with Kenji Miyamoto left untranslated, but it will be taken care of by @whiteboxgems​ whenever she has time! I’ll reblog it when it’s around.

This is actually 2 interviews, I’m posting them together because they were one after the other and (main reason) because the second one is very short.
A few notes below to better understand the interviews.

The first one is with Yuuichirou Hayashi, the one who created the ending (ED = ending by the way) footage. I have the feeling someone previously posted translations of the captions under the ED screenshots, but I don’t remember where and I’m pretty sure it was just the captions and not the interview parts, so here you have it complete. This one is pretty interesting because he explains in detail how they created the ED, and has some extra information on cut scenes etc. Definitely a must read in my opinion!

The second one is a short interview with Kayoko Ishikawa, the one who did the costume designs. Here you might think: didn’t Chacott design the costumes? I’ll explain. It’s more or less like with Mitsurou Kubo and Tadashi Hiramatsu: Kubo created the original designs for the characters, from scratch, and Hiramatsu transformed them into designs specifically created for animation, therefore with simpler lines, detailed expression sheets and so on. Likewise, Chacott did the original designs for the costumes, from scratch, based on the indications by Yamamoto and Kubo, and then the anime’s costume designer simplified and modified them so that they would be suitable to be animated. (Before actually animating them there’s a further step: the anime’s color designer is going to decide the exact colors, shadows and highlights included, that will be used inside the anime. I translated an interview with the color designer Izumi Hirose some time ago)

I usually don’t add pictures but this time I felt that it would be better to add them as an immediate reference. However, they are just for reference and are not meant to be visually stunning, so please bear with the quality because I just took photos of the magazine with my phone and quickly edited them.

Translation under the cut! (kind of image-heavy)

***If you wish to share this translation please do it by reblogging or posting a link to it***

***Re-translating into other languages is ok but please mention that this post is the source***

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An overdue list of my favourite pieces and fic writers! The following is a collection of Jungkook x reader fics. A big thank you to all the fic writers included for inspiring me and above all sharing such amazing stories!

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Handmade clothes and body image...

[cw: body image/weight]


Over the last 2 days i designed, draped, and sewed a dress. I really like it. It’s deep red shot cotton and I eked it out of just two yards of 44″ wide fabric, which I’m really proud of. It’s the first dress I’ve made in over two years, and I just feel good about it.

But I had a lot of Thoughts about Bodies and Clothes while making it. 

See, I started seriously garment sewing when I was 19 and deeply, troublingly insecure about my body. I’ll be upfront here: I wear a 30GG. I have a lot of boob, extremely narrow shoulders and ribcage, a short waist and a lot of hip, and just generally a lot going on for 5′3″. I started garment sewing because I wasn’t happy with the fit of off the rack clothes. I didn’t fully realize, then, just how detailed my knowledge of my own shapes would have to be to do this thing right.

So where am I going with this? I drafted a bodice. I draped a bodice. The fit isn’t perfect, because I’m really rusty, but it’s plenty good enough.

(you can see in the above photo that I didn’t get the bust dart placement quite right)

The point is that I started sewing at 19 because I was scared of my body. What I have learned in the intervening years is just how empowering knowing about your own body can be. It’s one thing to know that your shoulders are narrow and your bust is huge; I think most cis women know those sorts of things about their bodies and that’s part of the insecurity. 

But what is empowering is knowing how to make clothes that actually fit those shapes. You know: instead of a dress that is baggy in the shoulders and bursting across the chest, I can have a dress that hits my collarbone right and is a little blousy. I don’t even have WORDS for how much this has meant to me over the last few years. 

I’m mainly a knitter these days, but this applies here too. Choosing a sweater pattern? I can go one size down for the yoke and one size up for the chest. See how the raglan lines on this sweater hit my collarbones but the chest isn’t tight?

GO MAKE STUFF. FIGHT THE PATRIARCHY. TRUST YOURSELF. It helps. It really does.

Complice

Originally posted by apgujeon

Park Jimin. Hogwarts!au. 7k words. Fluff. 

↠ Unraveling the reasons to Park Jimin’s assortment into Slytherin.


Park Jimin, for lack of a better word, is magnetic. An eye catching grandeur. A brilliant meteor cutting through the dead of the night. A glitter of gold and silver. It is no exaggeration when you say you would find yourself singling him out of many other ground-swept robes, clicking heels, wand wielders. It’s not the hair, no –not the locks of fireplace or charcoal ashes, it isn’t also the distinct pitch weaving through buzzing chatters nor is it the recurring dark smoke filling the air at the back row in charms. Thinking of the reason alone sends a pang of melancholy through your veins as your mind tries to block out the patches of defiled memories almost instinctively. But the unavoidable fact of the matter is, Jimin was once your world.

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