i hope this one is even better

thenjw  asked:

just watched the spring day from music core and GOSH jin (and everyone) looks so lovely, and the choreo is so dynamic!! goodness!!!! so much interaction and movement and like. use of the stage!!

Waaaahhhh, this performance got me choked up like an old engine I tell you what, it’s fucking beautiful, this one - man - I still can’t decide but this is close to I Need U as far as my favorite BTS choreo goes and I can’t even believe I’m saying that because I love I Need U so much but hhhhh gave me shivers too. JIn legit looked like True Royalty  - all the boys did such Princes, such amazing performers, such voices!! So much Jin < 333 Thank you for blessing my inbox with this ask friend, I hadn’t seen this yet!!!

Everybody feast your eyes and ears on this glory and have a blessed day < 3

How would you feel?


I want to dedicate this story to @littlewhitelies1403 and @whoopsharrystyles

I hope you will have some day such an amazing day in your life, with a man who loves you genuinely. And I hope I can share this amazing and wonderful day with you. I will sit on the obligatory “single table” watching you while you’re dancing. And maybe I will have one or two tears in my eyes. 

I hope you will be happy one day, I hope you will find your imperfect, perfect man. 

All the love 

E. 


The paper lanterns wiggle in the balmy summer night wind. It’s way after midnight and the crowd has thinned out. Only a handful of guests are sitting on the round tables which are covered with long white tablecloths. They are your closest friends, your parents, his parents, and his sister with her boyfriend. It was a beautiful day, better even than you dreamed. You had dreamed about this day since you were a little girl, and THIS day bested your dreams. He did everything so that you have the perfect day.

You’re  drunk by the night, he too but you saw him at the bar with his best man, drinking some whisky, but also searching for your eyes.

You’re talking to some guests sitting near the dance floor. Your hand rests on the back of the chair, which is also white and the cold metal cools you off. You danced a lot, with your father, with your uncle and of course with your new husband. As you heard Ed’s voice singing for the first time on your wedding you had to smile. He knows you so well. Harry requested Ed play some of your favourite songs as he twirled you around the dance floor.

Now that the candles are nearly burned down, the waiters start to dismantle the buffet.  Your legs are hurting and the corners of your mouth are hurting too.  You laughed and smiled all the time.

Harry touches your shoulder gently while he’s nodding in Ed’s direction, and he smiles knowingly. Ed walks to the band and grabs his guitar.

You feel his soft touch.  Excusing yourself, you turn around to look into his green eyes. His hair is a little sweaty, and he doesn’t wear his jacket anymore. The sleeves of his white shirt are rolled up, so you can see his anchor tattoo. With tender fingers you touch his anchor. His heart skips a beat as he feels the metal of your wedding ring on his hot skin. You made him the luckiest man in the whole world today. You married him today, and he wants to scream it from the rooftops.

“What’s the matter?” you ask him with a soft, tired smile.

Ed starts to play. It’s an unknown melody that you have never heard before. You frown.

Keep reading

good things about my two days trip to London:

  • London. just, London. I’d missed it!
  • street singers/musicians
  • met two nice people who were there for Emma Wxtson
  • proved to myself I can be strong and determined when I want to (it makes the disappointment even worse though)
  • seeing Luke Evxns (and everyone else)… but from afar… :/
  • happy, cute gay couples holding hands
  • a woman asked me to take a picture of her in the DisneyStore with the batb rose and her soon-to-be-bought Belle and Gaston dolls
  • buying batb merchandising including batb mystery mini funkos, the dolls, and my very first special mug!! it’s huge I’m gonna make the best teas and hot cocoas in it
  • somehow not getting sick (yet??)

sad/bad things about my two days trip to London:

  • waiting, freezing and shaking a total of 14 hours in the icy cold
  • f*cking storm doris making it even harder to deal with
  • feeling like dying once in bed. I’m sorry, body, I didn’t mean all the pain
  • health related anxiety
  • my irregular period decided it was a great time to show up
  • my lips are currently dead, so are my shoulders
  • not getting one of the many invitations randomly given away to see the screening
  • people… getting invitations… even though they didn’t know about the event until they stumbled across it 45 minutes earlier… (yes I’m very bitter about that)
  • seeing Luke Evxns only from afar (like really afar, not 2 meters afar :/)
  • so, no chance to get a picture like I’d hoped so hard
  • feeling like I went for nothing
  • (but hey at least I bought cool stuff I’d planned to buy! the LeFou mini funko is ADORABLE I think it’s my favourite out of the five different characters I got (got the Prince twice, ball dress Belle, Lumière, kneeling Beast, and LeFou). I’m sad I didn’t get Gaston tho. LeFou feels lonely without his buddy. but gosh the Gaston doll is stunning!)
  • couldn’t find the batb novelization
  • misgendering once people hear my voice but oh well
  • “wow I had never met someone so quiet before… like shy people yes, but never someone who doesn’t talk at all” thanks what do you want me to say about it? stop acting like you’ve made a new species discovery
Happy Birthday to my Hubby! <3

To Jey @jeylovestoblog
Happy birthday to my better half in this JeyLy ship. I just wanted to say that I love you from the bottom of my heart, and hope you have an amazing day doing whatever it is your heart’s desire. You are such a strong-minded and strong-willed woman I have ever met, and hope you continue to stay that way. You are a wonderful good friend of mine, and you pretty much know everything there is to know about me, and we haven’t even met in person yet. I honestly hope that one day that we do meet because I am not going to lie, but I kind of want to be squished by your boobs lol (you’re taller than me right? I’m 5′4, so I think I do go up to your boobs or your shoulders haha). OH! I can’t forget your silly/quirky side. You are freaking hilarious, and you are pretty much a walking meme when it comes to BTS haha I love your reactions and can’t believe you are now a gif XD I”m jelly girl!! I could honestly ramble on and on about how much I love you, so I’ll just settled with this tiny drabble!


                  “Kim!!!” Taehyung shouted, banging on Seokjin and Kim’s bedroom. 

Seokjin let out a long sigh and closed his book. He looked over to his peaceful girlfriend, who was currently napping after having to pull an all-nighter. He quickly walked over to their door and flung it open. Seokjin glared at the frantic man, and politely demanded him to be quiet.

Taehyung whined, “But Seokjin! I need to talk to Kim! She knows Jey better than anyone else, and I am in desperate need for advice.” 

Seokjin pinched the bridge of his nose, feeling his brain slowly throb against his skull.

                  “Well, can’t you go ask the other girls? Kim is currently napping, and I don’t want anyone disturbing her much needed rest.” He stated quietly yet harshly, blocking his bedroom door with his body. 

Taehyung made a whining noise, “But! But! Jey is going to kill me if she found out I forgot her birthday again!”

                 “What was that Taehyungie??” Taehyung heard an all too familiar voice say in the sweetest tone of voice. His body instantly froze as he knew who that voice to belong. He hesitantly turned around,closing his eyes shut, as he was immediately greeted with the deadliest glare he has ever witnessed from the love of his life.

Jey narrowed her eyes at her forgetful boyfriend and crossed her arms over her chest, accidentally causing them to be pushed up a bit. 

Taehyung eye’s widened at the amazing sight, but soon killed his hormones when his brain reminded him that she was pissed off. 

                   “I can’t believe you forgot my birthday!” Jey bellowed before storming off and slamming the door to their bedroom.

Taehyung winced from the sound of the slammed door. He sadly turned to Seokjin, who was busy chuckling at Taehyung’s predicament, and hung his head low.

                  “I’m going to be a sub again, huh?” 

                  “Yeah pretty much…” 


Originally posted by btsdaddy

Originally posted by jimin-bts-trashs

Originally posted by yourpinkpill

Originally posted by mayfifolle

Originally posted by kaiinyourarea

Happy Birthday Again HUBBY!!!!

anonymous asked:

did you read the article on the nhl website that said 'Sidney Crosby happy to be outside again'? I found the title funny but the content not so much

Ha!

They keep him locked away in an airtight chamber to maintain freshness and only take him out for games. (But is that the one where he says he hopes he has better memories of this game because oh, honey 😟)

Just like Tom Brady who claims he’s never had Dunkin’ even though he’s been living in Mass for how many years?

2

No make up vs highlighted to the gods.
Even though I didn’t get out pjs until late afternoon, it’s never too late to make at effort haha.
Love both of these pictures, I don’t think I look better or worse in one or the other, but sometimes it’s nice to look nice(ish). Off out for drinks soon, hope everyone else’s Saturday’s are off to a good start 🍷🎉💕.

Self Care Quest Today

You make this quest an entry in your positivity notebook. If you dont have one, you can either do it on a piece of paper or in your head. But its better on paper!

Ask yourself or write down: “Why am I strong?” Everyone is strong in their own way.
Make a list. For example:
I am strong for…
Being alive
Constantly growing
enduring or having endured hard times
for trying to take care of myself
for doing this quest
etc. etc.

Take your time.
I hope you see the strength in you you badass gorilla. either way even if you cant manage to do so its alright too! In my eyes that makes you even stronger for at least trying.

“On Tuesday, January 10, I’ll go home to Chicago to say my grateful farewell to you, even if you can’t be there in person. I’m just beginning to write my remarks. But I’m thinking about them as a chance to say thank you for this amazing journey, to celebrate the ways you’ve changed this country for the better these past eight years, and to offer some thoughts on where we all go from here…I hope you’ll join me one last time. Because for me, it’s always been about you.” —President Obama. Get the details on his Farewell Address at wh.gov/Farewell.

9

seokmin + MVs

↳ 1997.02.18 | happy birthday to the love & light of my life ☀️

I just want to talk about this. I see So Many backhanded compliments to The New Crystal Gems saying like, “it’s nice to have some realistic Lapis and Peridot interaction without Lauren Zuke’s shitty writing cramming the ship down our throat” or something like that, and, like, it was not bad writing?? It was not out of character or anything. As somebody trying to recover from depression, I found that one of the best things you can do for yourself is to surround yourself with positivity and go through the motions, and even if you don’t feel anything, you don’t feel bad, and you start to get better, and that is very clearly what Lapis is trying to do. She’s just riding the wave of Peridot’s genuine excitement of exploring every intellectual inch of life she never even knew existed before and, sort of hoping that if she plays along, some of that happiness may rub off on her. She’s watching her Earth show, making meep morps with her, helping her decorate the barn, even making music with her, and she smiles. There are moments where Lapis just smiles, and that’s her trying. I love the toilet meep morp scene in particular, because during this scene, the same dark ominous music that always plays when Lapis uses her water abilities plays, but what she’s using them for isn’t something out of rage or desperation, she’s funneling that same power she only ever associated with negative things into something silly and pointless that Peridot thinks is beautiful and makes her excited. This is Lapis healing. Peridot is the medium by which Lapis is healing herself, and that is beautiful writing.

i just want seven to bee happy

based off of this

Day Fifty-Six

-It begins. Black Friday. Until today, I had thought stories of shoppers sprinting through the aisles were myths. I now know better, and I am terrified. Luckily, I found my register to be stocked with stickers, so at least I have been given this small beacon of hope.

-I witnessed Hipster Sasquatch lumber into the store, not to be seen again.

-A young girl, no older than eight, purchased five teddy bears much larger than she herself. She was entirely incapable of carrying even one of them, but, much to my inspiration, this fact did not stop her from trying.

-A mother told her young son that he could pick one pack of gum. After a moment’s contemplation, he picked the single largest value pack of gum we had, triple the cost of any other pack. This was still acceptable under his mother’s rules, and in my eyes, that makes him the single most thrifty Black Friday shopper I encountered tonight.

-I overheard a guest at a nearby register say, “I just killed a girl.” I do not know how serious they were or what the context was, but I am grateful to be working the registers and not the floor tonight.

-Several guests came into the store solely to buy a bottle of soda. I do not understand why they would take such a risk or sit through such a wait, but I admire their bravery and was happy to ring them up.

-Multiple groups of women traipsed through the store in matching homemade Black Friday shirts. These people embrace the chaos of the night far too eagerly. I feel they would thoroughly enjoy a purge-like event, but only so as to raid department stores, and I respect that.

-While there were, as expected, several guests who were unhappy with how their night was progressing, twice as many asked how I was doing, genuinely interested, and expressed their concern and gratitude towards me working tonight, apologizing on behalf of those with less respect. While these were just small gestures, they meant the world to me and made my shift bearable. 

-One of the biggest sellers of the night was a four foot tall Michelangelo statue. This was Michelangelo the teenage mutant ninja turtle, not Michelangelo the acclaimed Renaissance artist, but it was just as terrifying as if it had been the latter.

-I walked through the store on my break. Shelves had been ransacked. Displays had been picked dry. Sleepless and soulless faces passed me, scavenging for the last sales of the night. I did not expect this level of barren apocalyptic wasteland until Trump was at least inaugurated, yet I found it all around me.

-I was accused of hurting a woman with a powerful static shock, despite not coming within three feet of her at any point. I believe this to be my superhero origin and I look forward to becoming a much less cool and much more white Virgil Hawkins. 

-A woman informed me that she would only buy an item she had brought up if it rang up at $5. It turned out to be $4.26. She made me put it back. I do not understand the logic, but I admire someone so firm in their beliefs.

-Coworkers who regularly bring everyone candy during long shifts are the best kind of coworkers. 

-In hopes of making it through my shift and the drive home alive, I downed an energy drink. Unfortunately, I forgot that energy drinks tend to make me believe I am even funnier than I usually think. I would now like to apologize to the guests who found this out tonight.

-I am reminded of how grateful I am that I work at Target, as even in the midst of the conservative south, I am surrounded with people who are as upset about Trump and Pence existing as a concept as I am, and this leads to many a great conversation.

-A man was offended to find that the Red Bull he was about to buy was sugar-free. He replaced it with a full-sugar one, telling his father that he was trying to die and that was not going to do the job, and branding himself the most relatable guest of the night.

-I am thankful for those who attempted to lift my spirits throughout my shift, but I would specifically like to single out the big daddy of dad jokes who tried very, very hard. Displaying a case of selective dyslexia, the man read out the card reader’s instruction of “do not remove card” as “don’t move,” and proceeded to pose and freeze in place for a solid thirty seconds. This man committed to an extent I would not have expected from him and he will never be forgotten. 

Hey guys! This time I wanted to make a quotes list for the writers again, since there are more writers who deserve to be recognized. Same as before, I hope you like these quotes and find them inspirational like I have!

Virgil

  • “Wherever the fates lead us let us follow.”
  • “The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what a man or woman is able to do that counts.”
  • “Go forth a conqueror and win great victories.”
  • “Come what may, all bad fortune is to be conquered by endurance.”
  • “They succeed, because they think they can.”
  • “Endure the present, and watch for better things.”
  • “Perhaps even these things, one day, will be pleasing to remember.”

Theodore Roethke

  • “Over every mountain there is a path, although it may not be seen from the valley.”
  • “What we need is more people who specialize in the impossible.”
  • “Time marks us while we are marking time.”
  • “I learn by going where I have to go.”

Socrates

  • “Success is dependent on effort.”
  • “It was my care to make my life illustrious not by words more than by deeds.”
  • “Wisdom outweighs any wealth.”
  • “Always desire to learn something useful.”
  • “Fortune cannot aid those who do nothing.”
  • “There is no success without hardship.”

William Wordsworth

  • “To begin, begin.”
  • “Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.”
  • “Faith is a passionate intuition.”
  • “Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher.”
  • “Life is divided into three terms - that which was, which is, and which will be. Let us learn from the past to profit by the present, and from the present, to live better in the future.”

Neil Gaiman

  • “The world always seems brighter when you’ve just made something that wasn’t there before.”
  • “Make good art.”
  • “I lost some time once. It’s always in the last place you look for it.”
  • “Life is always going to be stranger than fiction, because fiction has to be convincing, and life doesn’t.”
  • “Write your story as it needs to be written. Write it honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.”
  • “The one thing that you have that nobody else has is you. Your voice, your mind, your story, your vision. So write and draw and build and play and dance and live as only you can.”
  • “Sometimes the best way to learn something is by doing it wrong and looking at what you did.”
  • “The moment that you feel that just possibly you are walking down the street naked… that’s the moment you may be starting to get it right.”
  • “I’ve known ambitious people with no aptitude for the thing they did. Most of whom, rather terrifyingly, tended to succeed.”
  • “I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes. Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re doing something.”
  • “I’ve never known anyone who was what he or she seemed; or at least, was only what he or she seemed. People carry worlds within them.”
  • “The imagination is a muscle. If it is not exercised, it atrophies.”
  • “When I started out, there were a lot of things I knew I couldn’t do, and a lot of things I only found out I couldn’t do by going and doing it. And no-one was watching, and nobody cared.”

Percy Bysshe Shelley

  • “Fear not for the future, weep not for the past.”

Alexander Pope

  • “The greatest magnifying glasses in the world are a man’s own eyes when they look upon his own person.”
  • “On life’s vast ocean diversely we sail. Reasons the card, but passion the gale.”

Audre Lorde

  • “Only by learning to live in harmony with your contradictions can you keep it all afloat.”
  • “Each time you love, love as deeply as if it were forever.”
  • “Life is very short and what we have to do must be done in the now.”
  • “Our visions begin with our desires.”
  • “When I use my strength in the service of my vision it makes no difference whether or not I am afraid.”
  • “If I didn’t define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people’s fantasies for me and eaten alive.”
  • “I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood.”

Gwendolyn Brooks

  • “Exhaust the little moment. Soon it dies. And be it gash or gold it will not come Again in this identical guise.”
  • “Look at what’s happening in this world. Every day there’s something exciting or disturbing to write about. With all that’s going on, how could I stop?”

Homer

  • “Be still my heart; thou hast known worse than this.”
  • “And what he greatly thought, he nobly dared.”

Horace

  • “Remember when life’s path is steep to keep your mind even.”
  • “It is courage, courage, courage, that raises the blood of life to crimson splendor. Live bravely and present a brave front to adversity.”
  • “Always keep your composure. You can’t score from the penalty box; and to win, you have to score.”
  • “Begin, be bold and venture to be wise.”
  • “Nothing’s beautiful from every point of view.”
  • “Seize the day, and put the least possible trust in tomorrow.”
  • “Life grants nothing to us mortals without hard work.”
  • “The foolish are like ripples on water, For whatsoever they do is quickly effaced; But the righteous are like carvings upon stone, For their smallest act is durable.”
  • “Mix a little foolishness with your serious plans. It is lovely to be silly at the right moment.”
8

I wanted to tell you, but I was afraid it would open old wounds.

3

PLEASE LOVE YOUR TRANSGENDER & NON BINARY CHILDREN. THEY ARENT HURTING ANYONE. THEY ARE NORMAL AND THEY DESERVE YOUR LOVE. THATS ALL WE WANT.

I don’t care if they are 13, I don’t care if they are 30.

This is what transphobia looks like. This is what being 27 years old and your family is talking to you like a toddler and telling you “Sweetie, that’s just how the world is. We can’t change our minds. I’m sorry, we don’t love Kyle, we love Katie.”

I am strong. I will survive this. But this is what is killing children. This is what is killing adults. This is the ugly reality of things.

I went home for Christmas in the hopes I could show my family how good I was doing. Even after they told me I wasn’t allowed to come originally. I fought to be here. I had gained weight, me depression is better, my anxiety is gone, my smile was real.

But it was crushed. Every. Day. No one stuck up for me. Not even my siblings.

It’s not wrong to be transgender. You don’t need to be fixed! I don’t give a fuck if a book or some old dude tells you it’s wrong. I don’t care if your mom tells she doesn’t love you anymore and your dad hits you. It isn’t wrong. You are normal and you have to be strong and you have to live for you.

It is time to take control of your life. I don’t know what happens when we die. But I know it’s important that we live and show this world that we deserved love and respect and to be a part of a family.

Please be strong. Please choose to live because I am choosing to live and document this in the hope that one day it is going to get better and someone will find this and see even in the darkest hours we can pull through.

Kyle

[Revised 2/17] Books for Witches, Diviners and Spellcasters

Hi, everyone. A while back (a long time ago, actually), I started an annotated bibliography on books about witchcraft and magick, and I’ve updated it once (last November). 

Since then, I’d been keeping a list of things I need to add to it, but didn’t get around to actually reworking and updating the list a second time until today. Largely because I can’t really go outside much today because of the smog. But anyways, here it is. I’ve also included divination-related books in this version, whereas previously they were separate.

I hope you find something on here that suits your fancy! Happy reading! Also, yes, I do want to do more book reviews on this blog, so if you’d like a longer review of one of the books listed below, let me know and I can write one.

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after reading Energy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Hedgewitchery and Astral Travel

Ecstatic Witchcraft, by Gede Parma. This is actually probably my favorite book on this subject, even though hedgeriding is only a part of what the book discusses. The only bad thing I can really say about this book is that it’s really not recommended for beginners, and it’s helpful to have the basics of visualization already mastered (for example) before doing the exercises Parma recommends.

By Land, Sky and Sea, by Gede Parma. This book goes into even greater details regarding different ways of conceptualizing the cosmology of hedgeriding, and I find it a very refreshing book that appreciatively draws from a number of different perspectives while grounding itself, so to speak, with the overarching metaphor of land, sky, and sea as the three worlds.

The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak. Penczak is usually a pretty mixed bag, and this book is no exception. It gives a lot of good practical information and a very in-depth exploration of the three worlds (a useful concept), but it’s primarily framed by Wicca, so it might not resonate with those of other faiths and particularly those who aren’t pagan at all.

Ascension Magick, by Christopher Penczak. There’s a chapter or two in this that address alternate ways of conceptualizing the architecture of reality, and it’s pretty helpful for a hedgerider. Beyond that, this book is mostly about ceremonial magick, but it’s a (mostly) good book. Certain parts (such as the bit about UFOs) are a little off, in my opinion.

The Shamanic Witch, by Gail Wood. This book is really best suited for someone who practices Wicca and, besides the background info and cosmological descriptions, is really only useful in the context of that tradition. If you’re Wiccan or willing to pick around a lot of Wiccan-talk, though, this is a good foundation.

Witches, Werewolves and Fairies, by Claude Lecouteux. It can be hard to find scholarly works on these phenomena that are affordable, but here’s one I personally enjoyed. It details many accounts of journeying experienced by both pagans and Christians in earlier times, and gives a good description of the concept of the astral double, the architecture of the soul, and other topics throughout history.

Betwixt and Between, by Storm Faerywolf. This book is mostly a guide to the Feri tradition of witchcraft, but while I myself don’t practice that, those who do seem to know a lot about hedgeriding! The book has several chapters on the subject and is highly recommended for this reason.

The Psychic Energy Codex, by Michelle Belanger. A lot of people have strong opinions about this author, but this is book actually provides a lot of good information about so-called “energy work” which can be a step in the right direction for those wanting to ride the hedge.

Psychic Dreamwalking, by Michelle Belanger. In this book, Belanger discusses, essentially, how to use your non-waking life as a vehicle to for journeying, and while I myself don’t usually dreamwalk, much of what she says applies to hedgeriding in other states, too.

Hedge Riding and Hedge Witchcraft, by Harmonia Saille. I only mention these two in order to say that they’re best avoided. Saille tries to give a comprehensive look at the phenomenon, but it’s poorly-written and overly New Age. The negative reviews of them on Amazon really cover the problems with these book in more detail than I ever could.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I have major issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

Tarot

The Book of Thoth, by Aleister Crowley. Make sure you actually own (or have access to pictures of) the Thoth deck before you dive into this. By far one of the best books on Tarot ever published. The prose is often dense and purple, but in this one book, Crowley teaches so much about Tarot and it’s connection to the Western Mystery Tradition. I can’t really say much more - it must be experienced.

The Pictorial Key to the Tarot, by Arthur Edward Waite. I recommend this book because it is a classic and was introductory for many older readers. It will teach you to read and gives insight into the methodology behind the Waite-Smith deck specifically, particularly his use of what are essentially parables and why he does this. Do not expect too much esoteric information, but read it anyways.

Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom, by Rachel Pollack. This is the epitome of a good modern Tarot book and is really one of the first ones I’d recommend for someone looking for an accessible book on Tarot in a modern context. Very dense in information and history, yet altogether worth it. You’ll want highlighters nearby for this one!

Tarot for a New Generation, by Janina Renée. This is essentially a book for children and teenagers, but I do recommend it for them, specifically, because it is well-written, easy to understand, and helpful to absolute beginners.

Secrets of the Waite-Smith Tarot, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This book focuses just on the history, symbolism, and creative process of the Waite-Smith deck. It gives you an inside line on just what Pixie Smith was thinking when painting specific scenes, and is a great look at her life’s work, as well.

The Tarot: History, Symbolism, and Divination, by Robert M. Place. This book will not teach you to read Tarot, but does give an actual, accurate portrait of the history of the phenomena, which is incredibly important and useful. Know your history.

Understanding Aleister Crowley’s Thoth Tarot, by Lon Milo DuQuette. I hesitate to recommend DuQuette due to issues I have with his approach to Qabalah, but many people ask me for a beginner book for the Thoth Tarot specifically, and this is the closest I’ve come to finding one. I recommend reading this alongside, and not instead of, Crowley’s Book of Thoth.

The Back in Time Tarot, by Janet Boyer. This is more for the intermediate reader, and the entire book details a single, extremely useful technique for familiarizing yourself with the cards, namely by framing past events in terms of how they might appear in a spread.

Lenormand

The Essential Lenormand, by Rana George. This was not the first Lenormand book I picked up, but it was the most influential and intense. Ms. George writes in a personable, touching fashion and brings the concepts of the system home by relating them to life experiences in a way rarely seen. She is one of those authors I literally go all “fangirl” over.

Learning Lenormand, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This is one of the better beginner books on Lenormand. I’m not going to lie - it isn’t as good as Rana George’s, but it definitely is worth reading if you’re completely new to the system. It’s very accessible, where some of the books I’ll be listing later in this can seem intimidating, or so I’ve been told.

Lenormand: Thirty-Six Cards, by Andy Boroveshengra. This book is intense, but in a different way than Ms. George’s. Expect to be inundated with information and techniques. Another one of those where you really need to take notes or highlight while reading, and read it multiple times.

Secrets of the Lenormand Oracle, by Sylvie Steinbach. This book is organized in a novel and useful fashion by topic, and gives specific techniques for readings on love, money, spirituality, and other topics. Highly recommended, and I tend to use it as a reference book nowadays, looking things up as needed.

The Complete Lenormand Oracle Handbook, by Caitlyn Matthews. Not for the beginner, nor the faint at heart, this one details a lot of what, to me, seem to be more advanced approaches and techniques. I use this book a lot, and I think anyone else will enjoy it, too. Good information on the connection between Lenormand and traditional playing cards, too.

Cartomancy with Lenormand and the Tarot, by Patrick Dunn. This is more of a special topic book, and best read after you’ve got some familiarity with both Tarot and Lenormand. It’s all about using them in tandem and the synergy between them.

Astrology

The Luminaries, by Liz Greene. I could really recommend anything by this author, but she’s written so much, and this book is a particularly important one. It focuses entirely on the Sun and Moon in astrology, and gives a good look at why the luminaries need to have a special place in your understanding.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Practical Astrology, by Priscilla Costello. This is focused, as you might expect, on actual interpretation of charts and less on theory, but it gives a good background on that, too. Was quite helpful in my attempts to interpret @xepsurah‘s unusual natal chart.

The Complete Book of Astrology, by Kris Brandt Riske. Very beginner, and very light on intellect, heavy on intuition. A great introduction, but I would not suggest it as the only book you read if you’re really interested in the subject.

Tasseography

Tea Leaf Reading for Beginners, by Caroline Dow. There are only a few books within Llewellyn’s immensely popular “For Beginners” series that I would recommend, and this is one of them. The symbol glossary (which makes up the bulk of the book) is the most useful part.

Tea Cup Reading, by Sasha Fenton. This book goes into some detail (quite a bit, actually) about the history of tea and coffee, and, better yet, how to prepare them in the traditional fashion! A lot of traditional lore is described, as well.

Scrying, etc.

Scrying for Beginners, by Donald Tyson. This is really a surprise find, as I don’t usually expect much from this series, by Tyson knows his history and goes far beyond simple exercises for scrying. He is a bit biased towards mirror and crystal-gazing techniques, but does discuss other methods.

Psychic Development for Beginners, by William Hewitt. Readable, and offers some very practical developmental exercises for those wishing to hone extrasensory abilities. Be prepared to sort through a lot of woo, though.

You know what I hate more than my art style?

I tell you.

Nothing.
I hate nothing more than my art style.

But my mom came to me yesterday and told me the story of the archer who was so focused on the target that he could never hit it.
Until that one day he learned to enjoy his practice and finally understood that the more you like doing what you do, the better you improve.

Did he hit his target in the end?

Yes.

And I hope to be like him and finally accept my mistakes just to get better without even realising.