i don't know how to color it but the sketch came out great so

anonymous asked:

PT 2 - so slow? i need to find a way to ease myself into learning again, but it's so exhausting. is there any way you'd suggest going about this? it sounds like you just threw yourself into anatomy over the course of about a year, which is incredible and really impressive, but i don't know that it's something i can imitate. how would you suggest getting a better grasp on color theory and stylization of anatomy, in particular? sorry this is in two parts, i hope it isn't any bother. take care!

Entire question for those reading:

hiya! your stuff is mindblowingly gorgeous, i just now came across your work and you’re incredibly talented, especially considering your age! without getting too personal/into TMI territory, i was wondering if you’d be willing to give some advice - due to depression and other illnesses, i’ve been practically nonfunctional in most aspects of my life for a couple of years now. what i’d like to know is, i guess, how would you recommend someone go about improving in art when they have to take it so slow? i need to find a way to ease myself into learning again, but it’s so exhausting. is there any way you’d suggest going about this? it sounds like you just threw yourself into anatomy over the course of about a year, which is incredible and really impressive, but i don’t know that it’s something i can imitate. how would you suggest getting a better grasp on color theory and stylization of anatomy, in particular? sorry this is in two parts, i hope it isn’t any bother. take care!

Thank you! And always remember that you don’t have to stress about learning at your own pace- you’re not less of an artist if it takes you a few extra months or years to grasp a concept or to gain skills.   

For your question now: I’d recommend setting a small goal of drawing a figure a day- or just focusing on sketching a few hands, ears, noses, torsos, whatever- and slowly increasing the amount you draw as time goes on.  If you forget or neglect to draw on one day, don’t let it get to you, and just keep drawing the next day.  People say you have to draw every single day for eight hours a day to be a great artist, but in all honesty it won’t kill you to skip a day.  On another note, draw people that interest you.  Literally the only reason why I wasn’t bored out of my mind studying anatomy was because I wasn’t technically studying anatomy, I was just drawing people that fascinated me and taking small mental notes of their shapes and proportions.  Sometimes I would see a girl or a guy and think, man I gotta put this on paper (not sure where this sensation comes from, but I’ve been noticing it more and more as the years have gone by).

I don’t think I’ll talk about color theory just yet, but if you want to stylize anatomy it’s a good idea to think about two things in particular: 

1, look at the work of artists you admire (that stylize their work).  What makes their figures so pleasing to you, where is your eye drawn, and what aspects of their drawings would you like to adopt?  It can be something as major as overall gesture and energy of their figures, or something as small as the way they sketch fingers.  Maybe theres some softness, or snap, or attitude, or sensualness to the people they depict that you’d like to emulate- consider copying of their work (obviously don’t tell anyone it’s yours) and paying attention as you copy to see what you absorb.  

2, watch people around you in real life (or use pictures if you’d like) and note what interests you about them.  Keep the little things in mind: the way their hair glints in sunlight, the way they slightly lean to one side when they talk to someone they’re comfortable with, the face they make when they’re happy-surprised versus disappointed-surprised, so on and so forth.  You don’t have to throw all of your observations into your art immediately, of course, but when you realize that there are a lot of very minute (and at times indescribable) things that make us seem more human, it gradually makes it easier to stylize and to express little pieces of humanity in your art, and people will begin to connect with it and feel genuine emotions when they look at your works.  

For now, just see if you can get in a sketchbook page or two a day; and take some time to look at people, whether they’re living and breathing, or filtered through the eyes of an artist.  You’ll get some valuable knowledge from these small exercises, and you’ll notice some improvement in due time.

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“Makin’ my way downtown, walkin’ fast, faces pass, GO FUCK YOURSELF!”

Hey uh so yeah I did this thing as coloring practice? Think it turned out… Not… Terrible… And the Jacksepticeye fan base seems really nice and cool, so I thought you guys might enjoy! :D if not then just keep scrolling about your business. Might put up some slightly better sketches I’ve done of Jack later, who knooooows~

Anyway, HOPE YOU GUYS ARE HAVING A GREAT NIGHT/DAY! @therealjacksepticeye you’re awesome, don’t go changing. Or do, I’m not your boss. *shrug*