i am so done with this scene

The Mistake (Part 4) - Stiles Stilinski

Author: @were-cheetah-stiles

Title: “The One Where Stiles Plays Al Green”

Characters: Stiles Stilinski, Malia Tate, Lydia Martin, Scott McCall, Allison Argent & Reader

Author’s Note: So far, I think this is my favorite chapter. I am so grateful that @fillthevoid-stilinski asked me to write this series. It has been some of the most enjoyable writing I’ve done thus far. All of my inspiration and the only reason that this story exists is because of her fake relationship series. Go read it.

Thanks: to @ellie-bee242 for helping me decide what to do with the Stiles and Lydia scene. I was really conflicted and she is just the bomb.

Song: You definitely have heard this before, and I am imploring you to listen to it. You gotta understand what Stiles was hearing that finally made him go for it.

Gif credit: @ludi-lin

Summary: The night after Scott and Allison’s wedding, Stiles finally admits that he wants more than just a fake relationship.

Prologue - Part 1 - Part 2 - Part 3 - Part 4 - Part 5 - Part 6 - Epilogue

You and Stiles finally left the reception around four in the morning, splitting a cab and returning to your respective homes. He trudged into the post-wedding, pre-honeymoon sendoff brunch at a quarter to nine, chugging blue Gatorade and trying to stave off premature death. He smiled, however, when he saw you happily chattering with Malia over an empty chair between you and the beautiful were-coyote. He glanced around the room and didn’t see anyone standing, so he sauntered over, hoping you had been saving the seat for him. You felt strong heart palpitations when you saw Stiles, already half-dressed for work, his white sleeves rolled up to his elbows and his skinny black tie, hanging, unknotted, from his collar down his shirt-front.

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Rey's Interrogation
The Force Doth Awaken
Rey's Interrogation

Rey’s interrogation from Act IV, Scene II of William Shakespeare’s the Force Doth Awaken by Ian Doescher.

REY
Where am I?

KYLO
—Thou art welcome as my guest.

REY
Where are the others, all my comrades true?
What hast thou done with them? Are they herein?

KYLO
The comrades, ha! Thou meanest all the thieves,
The murtherers and traitors thou call’st friends?
Their treachery doth mock thy loyalty,
Their gross dishonor doth negate thy honor.
Thou shalt be wholly comforted to know
I have no knowledge of their whereabouts.
Yet let us speak of them no more. Instead,
’Tis thy mind that doth bring me interest:
Much like an open book, I look inside
And scan its contents like so many words.
Thy thoughts are clear: thou’d happ’ly see me dead.

REY
If ’tis the story thou dost read therein,
’Tis but the consequence of being hunted
By one who hides beneath a coward’s mask.

[Kylo Ren removes his mask.

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I am, like, two or three scenes away from finishing my first book that I intend to publish.

That doesn’t mean it’s finished—I’m gonna have to edit it to high hell, and I KNOW I’m gonna have to rewrite a good chunk of it, probably.

And before all that, even, I have to let it SIT so I can come back to it with fresh eyes. Publishing is not for those who seek instant validation. It’s a very long and painful process.

But the moment it’s done?

The moment I can lift up and display my first published novel to the world?

That will make the entire process worth it.

I still don't know if he ever got his coffee.

I’m not 100% sure this even belongs here and I’ve posted this story elsewhere so some of you might have read it already.

Some background: I work in a rather specialized area of Forensics. Officially I’m employed by Police Scotland but they tend to let other law enforcement agencies, universities, etc borrow us from time to time. A lot of the time it’s for consulting work or guest lecturing but sometimes we’re sent to teach training courses.

About 18 months ago I was asked to lecture at a training course for some of the CID higher-ups in an English Police force. It was the first time I’d done anything like it and I was crapping myself.

I met with the conveners and other officials for dinner the night before my first day, and after dinner and drinks, I was dropped back at my hotel.

So to set the scene; it’s about 10pm, I’m all dressed up in my evening wear and I’m sitting at the bar in the hotel lounge. The place is dead, it’s just me and the barman so I’ve taken off my heels and am unraveling my hair having just ordered a hot chocolate. The barman asks if I want mini marshmallows on my hot chocolate. Yes, of course I want mini marshmallows on my hot chocolate. No I don’t mind waiting while you run to the kitchen.

So I’m sit there trying to trick my phone into connecting to the hotels WiFi when Angry Man walks in.

He stomped into the room and slammed his fist down on the bar about 3 ft from me and barked out one word:

“COFFEE”

I didn’t know it but apparently that attempt at communication was aimed at me; a fact I learned a moment later when Angry Man moved right up next to me, bent over me so his face was practically in mine and barked out again;

“COFFEE”.

In an attempt to get away from the screaming coffee man I slipped off the bar stool, putting it between the two of us. Extremely confused and more than a little terrified, it didn’t immediately occur to me that he thought I worked there, hell it wasn’t even registering that he wanted a coffee. He was just repeating it the same way a toddler does when they learn a new word but don’t entirely know what it means.

I’m going to blame the confusion, fear and tiredness for my completely moronic response, which was to parrot the word back at him.

Me: “Coffee?”

Angry Man: “COFFEE”

Then he slammed his fist down on the bar again. This time I noticed that he was actually throwing down money.

My brain suddenly came back online.

Me: “Oh. Eh, the barman should be back in a sec. H-”

Angry Man: “Get me a coffee. Now.”

Ooooh four new words. Progress.

Me: “I’m sorry, mate, I don’t work here.”

Angry man (shouting now) “You fucking lazy liar!! Do you think I’m fucking stupid?”

Yes, actually, but I’ll be keeping that to myself.

Angry Man: “Get off your fucking phone and get me a shitting coffee”

Me: “I really don’t-”

Cue rant about me being the only person in the lounge so of course I must work there and I was just being lazy and did I take him for an idiot. All while I’m slowly backing away from the bar so he can’t pin me between it and the bar stools. Then he throws in this:

Angry Man: “Do you have any idea who I am? Do you have any idea how important I am?”

I never got to find out how important this guy thought he was. Instead Angry Man’s Friend came wandering in.

He took one look at me; pretty much cornered by Angry Man who is now screaming about how he’ll make sure I never work again while I’m trying to calmly tell him to back off and he tries to intervene.

He took Angry Man by the shoulders and moved him back away from me while asking him what was going on.

Angry Man: “This stupid little whore is refusing to serve me”

Me: “I really don’t work here”

Angry Man’s Friend: “She doesn’t work here. Let’s just all try to calm down”

There was a few moments of Angry Man’s Friend trying to calm Angry Man while he ranted about getting me fired until two barman arrived, one of them with my hot chocolate. The presence of the three men distracted Angry Man enough for me to grab my shoes and escape with my chocolatey goodness.

As I left I could hear him demanding to speak to a manager.

The next day, after being introduced to a lecture theater full of high ranking CID Officers, I stood and walked to the podium only to be greeted by one guy in the audience laughing hysterically.

I just sort of froze trying to figure out the joke. Did I have food on my face? Was my shirt on inside out?

A quick check confirmed that, no. I’d managed to adult that morning.

A few other people began to chuckle as this guy struggled to get a hold of himself. As he regained control he pointed to his left.

Where a very red looking Angry Man was sitting.

I think it was the sheer relief that he wasn’t actually laughing at me that caused me to open my mouth and say to Angry Man;

“Oh did you get your coffee in the end?”

He walked out and I didn’t see him for the rest of the course.

Season 4
  • me: it's a kid's show! they're not going to actually kill anyone off! everyone with these crazy dark theories needs to relax!
  • me: *watches season four*
  • me: *whispering* no one is safe anymore.
6

#so smol
#so pure

10

Nat goes on an undercover mission to a politicians’ party, she’s really bitter about the outfit choice and Steve’s mocking isn’t helping. 

honk honk its hance time
  • best friends since literal birth. since before birth. their moms were friends before they were born
    • so many embarrassing baby photos of the two of them in matching halloween costumes e.g. as woody and jessie from toy story
    • so many videos of them as little kids playing in hunk’s backyard, pretending to be explorers on a new planet
    • so many pictures of them at important events in each others’ lives (hunk at lance’s mom’s wedding, lance at hunk’s first piano recital, and of course hundreds of pictures of them at school dances, family vacations, award ceremonies)
    • also they “got married” at age 6 in lance’s bedroom and they both have photos from the wedding saved on their phones
  • hunk: [hyperfocusing] lance: [drawing hearts on post-it notes and slowly covering hunk’s back with them]
  • lance is chronically unable to not talk about hunk. doesn’t matter what he’s talking about, he will somehow relate it back to something hunk has said or done
    • pidge plays a game where she’ll bring up the most absurdly specific and obscure topic of conversation that she can think of with lance, and time how long it takes for him to start talking about hunk
      • his longest record is forty-eight seconds
  • lance: [takes hunk’s hands from behind, makes him dance]
  • both like to stim by making noise & like to copy each others’ noises
    • they will be sitting in the same room, working on separate projects, saying “bleep bleep bloop” back and forth to each other
    • they’re also the Spontaneous Harmonizing couple
  • hunk: [picks up lance when he’s in the middle of talking and just. holds]
    • lance continues talking almost as if he doesn’t notice
  • lance when hunk is being needy: ugh god hunk you’re driving me crazy, why am i even dating you hunk: ok let me just remind you that i, hunk, bore earthly witness to your real actual middle school scene phase, i was there, in the trenches, on the front lines, and i still had a crush on you so you don’t get to complain about anything i do literally ever
  • can smell each others’ meltdowns coming a fucking mile away
  • if one is ever hyperfocusing to the point that it’s sort of Bad the other will just. come over and take his hands and say “ok you’re done with this for now” and take him to get some food goo
  • lance loves when hunk lays on top of him it’s like he’s under a big ol rock and he feels safe and grounded
  • hunk when lance does something cool: [yelling] THAT’S MY HUSBAND
2

Joyeux Noël à @abadmeanman! I was your @mlsecretsanta 💝🎅✨

It’s a mutual reveal scenario! In which its a direct mirror of the ever infamous umbrella scene (sans the umbrella and rain).

(Shocking, I know) 

So a for the longest ive been wracking my brain on what to get you. Honestly i considered many possibilities and i still am but those, i decided, were better off as separate projects ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) because i wanted to go for a sfw approach.

I know it’s not much (trust me i wish i could have done more bc ur a cool dude) but this is the best i could do atm. it was my first time working with animations and i came across a lot of technical difficulties (like finding the right size so the finalized thing fits under 1MB or tweaking with the settings so it doesnt look wonky) but im actually proud of the outcome :)

anyways, i hope u like this and that you have a neato x-mas and a happy new year!💛🎉🎅

Scene Transitions

An important part of structuring your story in any format is the transition between scenes. When not handled properly, time and/or location jumps in a narrative can become disorientating and confusing, making it harder for the audience to keep up with the action. There are three important things to focus on when transitioning between scenes: where the first scene ends, where the second scene begins, and how to connect the two.

It’s important that each scene have closure. When you leave a scene, you need to know that the goal of that scene was reached. If you leave the scene too early, before you receive that closure, your audience will be left hanging, feeling unsatisfied and off balance. You need to ‘cut away’ when the scene comes to its natural end, when everything is understood and the audience is ready to move onto the next idea. If you leave the scene too late, it drags your story, and makes it feel like the scene is longer than it is.

As with the end of a scene, the beginning of a new scene must feel natural. If you have to backtrack immediately after starting your scene in order to explain whats going on, then it means you’re not starting at the beginning of the scene. You can sometimes get away with doing this, if the reflection is placed naturally in the writing, but you shouldn’t try and push your luck. If all of your scenes start with an immediate backpedal to explain where everyone is, how they got there, and when it takes place, then you need to go back and fix some things.

Information about the change in time and location are important to include. If you didn’t, then it would be impossible for the audience to tell if, when or how these changes occurred. The most widely accepted way of transitioning between scenes is to detail the things done by the characters to go from scene A to scene B. They can do so by showing the transition between locations (“They walked the distance to the theatre, laughing the whole way”), points in time (“hours passed as she sat reading in her favorite chair”), or combinations of the two (“they drove for days, the grassy hillsides of home growing into a looming mountain range”). The information in the transition must do everything to set up the new scene that’s starting.

I am going to use a segment from “These Shallow Graves” by Jennifer Donnelly as an example of what not to do when transitioning between scenes. In chapter thirty-four, a scene is ending where the protagonist and her love interest meet secretly during a ball and make a plan for her to sneak out later that evening. The scene ends on an angsty moment as they both watch her almost arranged fiance dancing with the competitor for his affections. Chapter thirty-five immediately begins with the two of them having met up and halfway to their destination. It is then explained how the protagonist had left the party early, snuck out, and made it to the meeting point.

Feels kinda jenky huh? Here’s how we could smooth this out.

Their plan for meeting up that evening involves the protagonist telling her uncle (who an attendee) that she is feeling faint and using that as an excuse to leave the ball early. This would make more sense as a place to end the scene as it signals the beginning of the transition between locations. When she sneaks out the house is a good place to officially begin the next scene, as it signals another change in locations. Because the time spent at the protagonist’s home is not important to the overall story (her waiting for everyone to fall asleep) this could serve as the transition between the scene of the first and the scene of the second meetings. The cab ride from her house to the meeting place is also its own small transition, and is a good place to reflect on past information without interfering with anything else going on (such as dialogue and bonding between love interests).

Remember! All of the important things to keep in mind when writing scene transitions are:
Know where to end a scene.
Know where to begin a scene.
Know how to connect the scenes.

anonymous asked:

Please please share your thoughts on Wonder Woman? Thank you! :)

ANYONE WHO WATCHED WONDER WOMAN (2017) DIR. PATTY JENKINS AND WASN’T COMPLETELY IN LOVE IS NOT TO BE TRUSTED

Some thoughts:

  • So we all knew it was going to be emotional to FINALLY have a female superhero movie, but the movie exceeded those expectations. The fight scenes were incredible and so focused on Diana and what she was capable of – the men basically weren’t even there. The fuckin no man’s land scene SAVED MY LIFE. Superhero movies are known for being heavy handed and this one didn’t escape that for sure (the love speech at the end was….a lot), but that scene was so well done…they didn’t have to stoop to some Éowyn knock off line of “I am no man,” we were allowed to just see her do what real women do - step up and do it. Even though that wasn’t the first time we’ve seen her in full Wonder Woman costume on screen, it felt like it was, like it was the first time I’d EVER seen ANY hero before and it took my breath away. By far the best Superhero Reveal Moment I’ve ever seen. My girl taking out bullets right and left, drawing fire from the entire German army!! Fuck me up!!!
  • You can’t talk about this film without talking about gender role reversals. Chris Pine was So Perfect and I think they really couldn’t have pulled the movie off if they’d cast any other white boy in the role. He was funny but genuine, capable but never arrogant, charming but not entitled about it. He learned quickly what Diana was capable of and respected her for it, always moving to the sideline during the fight scenes (the shield moment with the bell tower comes to mind - who needs a sniper when you can fuckin launch a god at the shooter??), knowing that these were her fights and never trying to mansplain her out of them. He wanted to protect her, but didn’t underestimate her - all the things that a typical female romantic interest does in these kind of movies. It was amazingly well balanced, so much so that I didn’t even mind the romantic sub plot. Plus he was almost entirely naked there, way to play to the audience my dudes!!!!
  • The historical context did the movie such a great service. The outward displays of sexism became so ridiculous when faced with Diana, who genuinely had never had to deal with the patriarchy’s bullshit before. It didn’t just make the men in London look pathetic and mean, it cast a large shadow over the way that women are treated today. 
  • The Dark DC Gradient™ on all the shots isn’t my favorite but it did Chris Pine’s fuckin bright blue eyes a huge favor
  • Gal Gadot was so fuckin good??? Not only was she beautiful, like really really distractingly beautiful, like I kept having to force myself to pay attention to the dialogue cause I, like Steve Trevor, could not stop looking at her (and she’s standing next to Genuine Stud Chris Pine and still?? SHE’S SO BEAUTIFUL). But she was way more then that, her performance was spot on. Diana was naive, commanding, strong, compassionate - while never being reduced down to just a one note version of these things. She felt so real to me, in a genre that spends very little time on character development. Even in the sappiest parts of the script, she sold it. She absolutely sparkled. 
  • Some of the best dialogue was the back and forth between Diana and Steve when she’s asking questions about mankind/London - it was cute and funny without being too overdone or obvious, which it easily could have been
  • The villains weren’t much to write home about, but they didn’t need to be. The movie was so laser focused on Diana and Steve that they really didn’t matter, you could self insert whatever you wanted to there
  • Themyscira is the ideal for I too want to hang out on the beach and never see a man again
  • Also that lesbian line, and how stupid male reviewers blindly did not understand it!!! Fuckin drag em
  • But also the fight scenes on Themyscira were INCREDIBLE. I wish that first section had been a bit longer just because I was enjoying it so much, but it was so refreshing to see all women on screen - women who fought and loved and supported each other. Incredible. 

I haven’t enjoyed, really enjoyed, to the point of not having to think about the message or the structure or how much fuckin time I’ve wasted listening to some male superhero talk about honor or some equally boring garbage, since The Avengers came out in 2012. Even then, Wonder Woman felt like something else entirely. It leaned on many of the same tropes and sequences, but there was enough reinvention in between (particularly the characters, who I felt were much more fleshed out then any superhero movie I’ve seen before) to make it feel fresh and exciting. This so easily could have been a throw away movie, a chance for movie execs to point and say, hey we tried with women that one time!! But Patty Jenkins, and Gal Gadot, and all the other women who worked on this incredible production, knew what was at stake, and weren’t going to let that happen. Every time I see a little girl dressed up as Diana Prince, on her way to the theater, my heart fills more and more. During the film, I found myself on the verge of tears five or six times - sometimes because it was so beautiful, to see a woman who felt so real being strong and vulnerable and saving the damn world, but other times because the plot itself genuinely moved me. Wonder Woman is revolutionary for the industry, sure, but more importantly, it’s just a damn good movie. 

“Not only are there no happy endings…There aren’t even any endings.”

Every time I read American Gods by Neil Gaiman, I find more things to adore about this novel. I read it this time while traveling across the United States, and I have to say, something about reading this book in transit just makes sense. It makes even more sense reading it while soaring over America itself, gazing down on fields and hills, a New Jersey import who lives in Chicago, went to LA a week or so ago, and just left Florida. There is something so intensely American about this novel, and it wows me every time. From the smaller mythic chapters telling folk tales and stories of the people who brought their gods to America, to the gods themselves and their characters, this novel always gets me. This was my third time reading this novel, and I’m going to dig deep to highlight new things that I had forgotten, so solid warning: Spoilers ahead.

I will never get over the way that Neil Gaiman melds together the idea of the gods and the land, and gives them both their own power and will. Something that wows me that I often forget about the standalone is now astoundingly diverse it is without being appropriative, and how Gaiman incorporates so many cultures, a diverse range of characters, as well as a huge amount of humor without it becoming problematic. I think this novel could be a guidebook for authors who want to know how to write diverse stories and mythos respectfully. I forgot about so many fantastic characters that Gaiman pours himself into, from Samantha Black Crow to side characters that brim with energy and character themselves, like Whiskey Jack’s son or Bilquis. I also never noticed before the two mentions of Mr. Nancy’s son that point to Anansi Boys. Not to mention the wealth of research and knowledge that goes into the bottomless well of background characters and visions leading up to the battle. 

One thing I gained a new appreciation for in this novel was the character of Shadow. He is big, and not dumb, and I remembered all that, but what I forgot is how nice he is. Shadow’s such a cinnamon roll of a character, and I forget that. He stands up for a waitress and believes in the good of people. At the Lakeside library book sale, he tries to find the book that’s least likely to be purchased, so that he can help the library out by buying it. He performs coin tricks for children. He is obligated to hold Odin’s vigil, but he never questions whether he should also hold Mad Sweeney’s. As Laura speaks with the cutting, too-open words of the already-dead, Shadow still refuses to tell her about her appearance or to not hold her hand, because he doesn’t want to hurt her still. When Shadow picks up bodies with the coroners, he carries them always in his arms. 

The scene between Shadow and Odin before his death is one of my absolute favorites (other favorite scenes include Samantha Black Crow’s protest kiss, the scene in which Shadow thinks snow into being, and Shadow’s long death scene). Odin recites to Shadow what he knows—the charms, in a long list. And it ends with that long scene where Shadow wonders what would have happened if he touched Odin’s hand, and wishes he had. And Odin’s twisting grift of the fiddle is so complicated and well done that even on the third re-read, I find myself forgetting about it until the moment Odin dies, and doubting myself on it until the moment Shadow says it out loud.

@neil-gaiman’s American Gods just gets better every time I read it, and I am cautiously thrilled and excited for the show coming out later this spring. 

“It doesn’t matter that you didn’t believe in us. We believed in you.”