i adored this movie

anonymous asked:

How's this for breaking stereotypes: my friend is 100% a ESTJ but she cries during every movie we have ever watched, even when we went to see Moana !

That is pretty stereotype breaking and also kind of adorable.

I actually find it way easier to cry at movies than at life, and before I knew about MBTI I articulated it in a really Te-user way, in that I can’t do anything to help the situation of the characters onscreen, but if something terrible happens in my actual life my first reaction is “what action can I take.” Which means that unless it’s in response to something where I truly can’t do anything (like…death or something) I tend to hold off on the crying until I’m somewhere private and have the time to deal with feelings.

Also as a much simpler reason, movies tend to optimize the emotion, which is good - it’s what they’re supposed to do - but it means that it’s easier to get sucked into it because there’s this perfect soundtrack and cinematography and no awkward distractions and real-life stuff. And finally, the nice thing about movies, especially for people with not-so-great Fi, is that you’re encouraged to relate to the characters because they’re not real and so you’re not forcing yourself into this situation and saying “oh yes, your pain is just like my pain, let’s make it about me”.

Small things I love about Moana
  • There is no talk of finding Moana a husband. SHE is going to be chief of her village. No one can take that from her.
  • How Moana is a competent leader before she even sets out on her journey.
  • The village seems to have more or less a hereditary monarchy that disregards gender and the matriarchal influence is clear: Moana is mostly inspired by her grandmother and the major deity in this movie is a Mother Goddess.
  • “Crazy” does not mean worthy of ridicule.
  • The central questions: “Do you know who you are? How do you know who you are?” Those cut deep.
  • The sibling relationship between Moana and Maui.
  • The vision about the ancient wayfinders. And “Know the Way,” which makes the entire sequence a million times more emotional.
  • This might be a Disney Princess movie, but it is also solidly an action movie.
  • Moana doesn’t like being called “princess”.
  • The goddamn gold-plated glow-in-the-dark giant crab. Who sings well.
  • Forehead touches. Between a human girl and a goddess.
  • The fact that Heihei manages to do ONE USEFUL THING in the entire movie.
  • Moana is so sturdily built. She managed to clock Maui, of all people.
  • Nature has agency.
  • How Gramma Tala’s passing is quietly understated. Her last words to Moana are those of sincere encouragement and her death is not explicitly shown. But you see the huge luminous manta ray a couple minutes later and you just know.
  • The entire sequence at the beginning that depicts island life. And Chris Jackson’s singing. Everyone’s singing, really.
  • Moana gulping deep lungfuls of air the first time her canoe overturned is so realistic, I could feel myself choking on ocean water.
  • The coconut pirates. They are VICIOUS little fuckers.
  • Moana earning a place among Maui’s tattoos.
  • Gramma Tala’s spirit is solid enough to hug. No more “LOOK INSIDE YOURSELF SIMBA” from the clouds.
  • Disney smashing the fourth wall and throwing shade at their own Princess story formula.
  • Romance is never ever ever even hinted at. Because Moana is all of 16 years old and she has bigger things on her mind.
  • All the songs. ALL OF THEM. They hit just the right emotional cues.
  • How culturally rich Disney managed to make this movie.
  • The sheer vividness of the animation. The wealth of expression on the faces of these characters. The colors.

i’m in my prime,
not withering and old.
but i refuse to play
your wicked games any longer.

i know this tether is unbreakable,
but you make me feel like i’m interchangeable.
you drew a target on my heart,
when did this become fatal attraction?

i don’t have the strength,
the energy,
nor the patience
to be held hostage by your love.

so baby please don’t despair
when i say that
i’ve found the courage to
let you go.

you were never meant to be tied down in the first place.

—  believing i could love you was my mistake, c.j.n.
8

get to know me (6/10} favorite films ☰ matilda (1996)

Everyone is born, but not everyone is born the same. Some will grow to be butchers, or bakers, or candlestick makers. Some will only be really good at making Jell-O salad. One way or another, though, every human being is unique, for better or for worse.

9

endless list of favorite female characters: Mary Poppins
Mary Poppins (1964)

“Now the, the qualifications… item one: a cheery disposition. I am never cross. Item two: rosy cheeks… obviously. Item three: play games, all sorts. Well, I’m sure the children will find my games extremely diverting.”

sorry but ratatouille’s ending is such a perfect ending. i gotta be honest: even with movies i adore, the ending doesn’t tend to be my favorite part, even when they are good. i’m usually all for the middle, the journey, the action. 

but this fucking ending is an exception. just put it on and i’ll tear up over that brilliant representation of how just one little thing (such as a simple bite of simple food) can bring back the most nostalgic childhood memories full force, in an instant. that great speech by ego, where he finally understands what gusteau really meant when he said that anyone can cook. that cozy little restaurant they end up opening. that beautiful, soothing song in french. ego, no longer a respected critic but clearly much happier, walking into the restaurant knowing the truth and asking remy, ‘surprise me!’, just. it’s so good. i love it.