hyperrealism

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Randy Hage’s “Facade” at Flower Pepper Gallery.

Opening on October 10th, 2015 at Flower Pepper Gallery in Pasadena, California is hyperrealist sculptor Randy Hage’s brand new solo show, “Facade.”

Hage painstakingly creates, from scratch, hyperrealistic sculptures of famous New York City locations that absolutely blow my mind (See Hage’s work previously featured).  For “Facade,” Hage has focused primarily on locations that were the cornerstones of their community in their past but now have either closed their doors or face impending destruction.  

The photos Hage uses to create his sculptures are basically indistinguishable from one to the sculptures while reviewing side by side comparisons creating a hefty dose of magic to the fantastic work that Hage is able to present to us.  By preserving these locations through his meticulous creations, Hage is helping to further memories of them as well as new ones, their rich history and to serve as warnings to what could be lost.

Facade” is on display at Flower Pepper Gallery from October 10th, 2015 until November 18th, 2015.

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Hyper Realistic Paintings by Young-Sung Kim

Korean artist Young-Sung Kim was born in Seoul in 1973 and graduated from Department of Painting, College of Fine Art, Hongik University.

Through his paintings, Young Sung Kim visually critiques the level at which we place “value” on objects both commercially and ethically. Kim uses contrasting subject matter to illustrate the distinction between the living and the material. It seems that as a society our ideas of how something is valued are intrinsically rooted in commerce. Kim seeks for the viewer to question the meaning and “value” of living creatures in our modern society.

Artist concentrates his exploration of life on small creatures such as snails, frogs, and goldfish. He paints these species resting on man-made objects such as cutlery and glassware. Stay up to date with his work by following him on Twitter.


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posted by Margaret via

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Trompe L’Oeil Ceramics That Imitate the Natural Appearance of Decaying Wood

Ceramicist Christopher David White accurately captures the decay of wood through ceramics, portraying the distinct character of the natural material from the fine wood grain to the light ash coloration at the pieces’ edges. By utilizing a trompe l’oeil technique, White forces the viewer to take a closer look at his work while also investigating the truth hidden in the hyperrealistic sculptures.

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Korean sculptor Xooang Choi‘s sculptures of bodies and imaginary creatures are often described as hyper-realistic, but they are also surreal in their elements of fantasy and nightmarish distortion. We’ve featured both his most imaginative and more graphic visions on our blog, sculptures that explore themes of destruction, transformation and re-assemblage. To Choi, the body is a vessel through which we perceive and express ourselves, and one that provides him with an ideal medium to explore the possibilities of the human condition.

See more on Hi-Fructose.