I’ve noticed a common trend in many new superhero stories (specifically CA:CW and the current Detective Comics run) that seem to promote the idea that superheroes are the CAUSE for all the disasters that come from super-people.  When we look at context, this simply isn’t true.  Contrary to Vison’s comments and Stephanie’s new outlook, superheroes are NOT directly responsible for supervillains.  Hydra would still be around even if Tony never became Iron Man.  The League of Assassins was around YEARS before Batman was even born.  We don’t need to stick the blame on the heroes for the numerous tragedies in the DC and Marvel universes, and that’s because we already have characters that use supernatural abilities without a thought for the consequences…SUPERVILLAINS.  As long as there are people like the Joker, Norman Osborn, or Lex Luthor in the world, people are inevitably going to get hurt.  A true superhero understands that he/she can’t stop every single evil act, but that doesn’t stop him/her from doing everything in their power to stop it from happening again.  Captain America said it best in CA:CW, “Sometimes you can’t save everybody, but you don’t give up.”

8

In light of the recent horrifying Cap twist, I have seen far too many “stop saying they made him a nazi, HYDRA aren’t nazis!!!11!1″ so I thought I would bring back this scene to remind everyone that yes they are

How’s everyone on team “Hydra’s not really Nazis” doing? Everyone good? Y’all staying hydrated?


[image description: a tweet from Anthony Oliveira (@meakoopa) saying “just noticed the neo-nazis doing security for white nationalist Christopher Cantwell are in HYDRA t-shirts,” with two screencaps from the Vice documentary on the Charlottesville neo-Nazi march showing exactly that]

  • Percy at 20: OK, I have to solve this hydra problem before brunch with Jason and Nico
  • Percy at 40: Chiron, I only have fifteen minutes. I have to pick the kids up at school. Where's the Gorgon?
  • Percy at 60: I have Cash in the Attic at six so I have to hurry. Ares making trouble again?
  • Percy at 82: No, Zeus. I really can't help. Well, I'm dead. What? Ah, fuck no. *gets brought back to life to deal with more god crap*
2

So I was watching Captain America: Civil War again. And I realised something. 

That bit at the end, where they find Zemo? They’re in Siberia. At the Hydra facility. Where Bucky Barnes was held, and trained, and conditioned, and tortured as the Winter Soldier. That’s his chair, right there. One of his chairs. He has at least one more – we saw one in Washington DC in CA:WS. But this is the big one. This is where he was given the order to kill Howard and Maria Stark, among others.

He’ll have a lot of memories associated with this place. A lot of very traumatic memories. He didn’t want to come here, we saw that in his face earlier. But he came anyway. Because Steve needs him.

That’s Steve Rogers on the left. And Tony Stark, also on the left. 

Bucky’s on the right, gun lifted, every muscle tense. The positioning of the scene means he’s separated from the others – physically and almost certainly mentally.

Look at his face.

Look at the terror. The barely-restrained panic. The stubborn determination to see this through – and he fully expects it to be a fight to the death against five other Winter Soldiers. It will mean his death and Tony’s death and Steve’s death, and then the world will fall and it will be his fault, because Bucky was the weakest of the six Winter Soldiers and he knows it. He knows he’s no match for even one of the other Soldiers, let alone all of them. He knows he will probably die here, in this place that has already caused him so much pain and suffering

(Also, for the entirety of Steve’s conversation with Zemo, Bucky’s in the background by the railing. We don’t see a reaction shot until after Tony finds out about his parents. But what’s Bucky doing there? Staring at the chair, trying not to throw up, perhaps? Trying not to pass out from the onslaught of memories, the emotional distress of being in such close proximity to the thing that was used to torture him for decades?)

He’s gripping that gun pretty tightly. He’s on edge. Maybe fighting the pull of his mind combined with this environment. In the previous scene, even when it was clear that Tony wasn’t about to shoot them on sight, he didn’t lower the gun until Steve physically waved him down. Was it because it was Steve, specifically, giving the order? Or was it his mind recognising a command from a superior officer?

He doesn’t want to be here.

He knows he’ll probably die here.

But he made a promise to Steve.

This? This is the end of the line.

And Bucky sure as hell is going to go down fighting.