humus

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Plant of the Day
Friday 3 July 2015

This garden meets land art installation at the RHS Hampton Court Flower Show used Echinacea purpurea (purple cone flower) to good effect. This upright North America herbaceous perennial has coarsely hairy leaves with stems producing a solitary flower-head with a characteristic raised central brown disc and with reflexed, light purple rays. This plant needs a deep, well-drained, humus-rich soil in full sun, in my dry summer garden in Essex, UK, I find it will not tolerate drought.

Jill Raggett

Hung out with an old friend that I haven’t seen in like a year and it was really fun. Idk it’s just nice knowing that I can go a year without talking with someone and then talk like we used to.

Also I had humus for the first time and it is the best thing I’ve ever eaten.

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The spectacular installation by Sicilian artist Giuseppe Licari presents a fanciful network of tree roots, which seem to transform TENT’s central space into a mysterious underworld: the roots project downwards from the ceiling as if the trees are growing above it. The title of the work is ‘Humus’, referring to the soil layer that is essential for the growth of trees and plants, but which is indeed absent here. The relationship between humankind and nature, growth and decay are central themes in Licari’s work, which resonates with an echo of Arte Povera.

Become a Biodynamic Gardener, and grow your own. Learn about “the buddy system” and “companion plantings” as well as composting and crop rotation. Certain plants benefit by growing near other plants: tall crops can provide a canopy for shorter crops; leeks will repel carrot flies; include flowering herbs and perennials to attract beneficial insects. 

Illustration:  Genevieve Simms 

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It’s change so gradual, you wouldn’t notice it if you saw it every day.

Here‘s an update from the shot of this area I took in December: the bee garden has developed, the strawberry snail is flourishing, and I’ve put in a number of trees and shrubs to form the canopy layer of the edible forest garden.

The conversion to forest soil is going very well, with successive sheet mulches converting the grass plane into soil bulk and nutrition.

I’ve said a number of times that my work “radiates out”: I start working in small spaces, stabilise a little ecosystem, and then expand out further into the grass plane, making sure I can maintain what I’ve built every step of the way. 

The progress is slow, but it’s solid.

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Humus, Tent Rotterdam 2012. The spectacular installation by Sicilian artist Giuseppe Licari presents a fanciful network of tree roots, which seem to transform TENT’s central space into a mysterious underworld: the roots project downwards from the ceiling as if the trees are growing above it. The title of the work is ‘Humus’, referring to the soil layer that is essential for the growth of trees and plants, but which is indeed absent here. The relationship between humankind and nature, growth and decay are central themes in Licari’s work, which resonates with an echo of Arte Povera. photos via

If you have every wondered what a Staghorn Fern (Platycerium superbum) looks like after 25 years of cultivation, now you have an idea.

This Australian native is normally found in rainforests, where it grows on trees and creates a “nest” where humus accumulates.

Like many orchids, bromeliads, and other ferns, it is an epiphyte (a non-parasitic plant that lives on another plant, instead of rooting in soil).

These plants are excellent at deriving or accumulating nutrition from their environment (pooling water, efficiently using water vapour, and deriving nutrition from organic detritus).

In nature, these plants are also important habitats: becoming micro-ecosystems that support insects, amphibians, reptiles, and other organisms.

#epiphytes #ferns #Staghorn fern