humboldt national park

10

Spent the weekend roaming the redwoods, lush with green from El Niño’s rain.

Redwood National Park, CA. March 2016. (Instagram)

Animals that have gone extinct elsewhere can sometimes survive on islands due to the isolation they offer. That’s the case with Cuban solenodons, insect-eating shrew relatives which are part of a mammalian line that has existed since the time of the dinosaurs. Known in Cuba as almiquí, solenodons secrete venomous saliva through a groove in their front teeth. The presence of this groove is an ancient trait, more often found in reptiles.

Today, only two solenodon species survive—one in Cuba and another on the nearby island of Hispaniola. That makes protecting their few remaining habitats for these mysterious mammals all the more important, says Gerardo Begué-Quiala, deputy director of Alexander Humboldt National Park, one of the solenodon’s few known stomping grounds.

Read more about solenodons on the blog. 

flickr

Sunlight and Forest, Humboldt County, CA by 4 Corners Photo
Via Flickr:
Morning sunlight filters through the towering redwood trees in Humboldt County, California.

4

Public Lands/ Exploration/ Night Sky/ 

Searching for a meteor burst last night in the Bald Hills above Redwood creek in Redwood National Park.  

I had visions of a Meteor burst behind this fire tower, if you zoom in a few images have a faint line or two, but overall every time I would place and focus the lens the meteors would then show up in a different part of the sky.

*note on editing:
I find it difficult to edit night photos. It’s a tough call between taking all of the amazing colors the long exposure captures, and trying to portray the scene more closely to the way I experienced it. I always find that to my eyes it looks more silvery blue, but the camera often finds many colors. Last nights photos out of camera had amazing greens, purple and blue which to people viewing the photos might be more interesting. But that’s not how it felt to be there alone in the dark walking in starlight.  Maybe I’ll share an alternate edit at another time.

These beautiful Polymita land snails, known as painted snails for their colorful shells, are found only in eastern Cuba, including throughout Alejandro de Humboldt National Park. The park, which stretches from the mountains to the sea, is among the most biologically diverse island sites on the planet. Cuba is home to at least 1,400 land snail species, more than 90 percent of which are found only here.
©AMNH/R. Mickens

flickr

Ferns and Home Creek, Humboldt County, CA by 4 Corners Photo
Via Flickr:
Five-fingered ferns (adiantum aleuticum) grow from the vertical walls Fern Canyon as water trickles down through the leaves into Home Creek in Humboldt County, California.

Humboldt County People,

4:10pm June 14 2017

This is a long shot but:
If anyone is interested to drive out to Bald Hills in about and hour let me know.

I’ll be leaving from Arcata.

I usually take adventures on my own but that’s no fun! Let’s take some photos out there in the lupine at sunset. There are some other cool spots in the forest that are beautiful in that warm light, I have room for two or three if someone is small. Edit: That did not work, but feel free to contact me into the future about collaborative explorations.

flickr

Light and Forest, Humboldt County, CA by 4 Corners Photo
Via Flickr:
The rising sun shines on tree tops while little light makes it to the floor of the forest in Redwoods National and State Parks in Humboldt County, California.

flickr

Ferns and Redwoods, Humboldt County, CA by 4 Corners Photo
Via Flickr:
Daylight filters through the towering redwood trees onto the ferns growing on the forest floor in Redwood National and State Parks in Humboldt County, California.

These beautiful Polymita land snails, known as painted snails for their colorful shells, are found only in eastern Cuba, including throughout Alejandro de Humboldt National Park. The park, which stretches from the mountains to the sea, is among the most biologically diverse island sites on the planet. Cuba is home to at least 1,400 land snail species, more than 90 percent of which are found only here. ©AMNH/R. Mickens

Post: Journey to Humboldt National Park

Journey to Montana

Humboldt-Toijabe National Forest is the largest national park in the continental 48 states. But it’s not all one park - it’s a series of parks. We visited Humboldt National Park- it is amazing. 

We had no guides. We had no map. We had an idea that we would hit a major trail head and see how far we could go. We went about 700 yards before turning back and heading the other direction. 

We took a moderately intensive trail - lots of switchbacks. This is where we started. We were trying to get to Lamoille Island Lake. But we turned around and headed to Lamoille Lake because the trail seemed to have disappeared.

When we turned around, we saw someone trying to do a selfie at the trail head. She offered to take our picture. She was a pretty good photographer!

Hannah was in heaven on these trails. She was calm, cool, and just enjoyed every minute. Kyle and Ileana argued about walking sticks for the first half. But they also had fun. They’re a bit blurry here, but oddly it seems to capture the scene.

Ileana found a horse. And a real cowboy! I think the cowboy said his horse’s name was Woah. But then he said “like the Indian name.” Woah.

There was still snow in the mountains!

Kyle was infatuated with sticks the entire time. It became something of a nightmare – nature’s equivalent of an iPhone.

Hannah felt like nature’s royalty.

It was a great hike - we did about 4 miles according to Nike Fuelband. The kids went into went into a deep sleep on the way home.