humboldt living

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Singin blues and lovin life with this sweet honey bee angel that I loveeee so much. 🍯@alycurr
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#cover #duet #acapella #love #blueskycover #songmedicine #sing #humboldt #honey #thevoice #ukulele #ukulelecover #music #live #discover #singers #louberry #blues #makingmagic #musicislove #lovinyou #flame
(at California)

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anonymous asked:

Have you always lived in Humboldt county or did you move for school?

I used to live in a suburb near Los Angeles in Southern California, and I moved up here for school. I love it here and ill probably keep living here for quite awhile! There’s just so much nature and so many great people here!😊🌿🌲✨

Take the Humboldt “jumbo” squid, which lives in the Eastern Pacific waters, a body currently plagued by extreme and rapid climate change. This has caused the water’s temperature to keep swinging wildly, wreaking havoc on the local marine wildlife. But not ol’ jumbo, which not only managed to use the cooled water to slow its maturation and double its lifespan, but also managed to keep growing, reaching 10 times its normal size. It’s almost as if squids are being written by hack sci-fi writers trying to find a reason why their movie monster can’t be killed.

But if they’re just good at fucking and staying alive, why should we ever fear these underwater lab rats? Maybe because, even though cephalopods look like they’re the bastard alien offspring of Cthulhu and a beach ball, there are few species that have more in common with us humans. With their large brains (relative to their body size), big and complex eyes, and curious nature, they display quite a “human-like intelligence.” They even have eight separate limbs that are dextrous enough to operate tools. Imagine how many goddamn jars you could open with eight completely opposable fingers instead of two hands.

But the same reason they’re enjoying a bit of an evolutionary boost might also spell their doom. The fishing industry isn’t in a hurry to slow down, so eventually there’s going to be a lot more calamari on restaurant menus. As long as we’re top dog up here, cephalopods aren’t going anywhere, except to a delicious hell of parsley and olive oil.

7 Species That Will Rule The Earth When We’re All Dead