humanity in motion

The physics of the "hardest move" in ballet

In the third act of “Swan Lake”, the Black Swan pulls off a seemingly endless series of turns, bobbing up and down on one pointed foot and spinning around and around and around … thirty-two times. It’s one of the toughest sequences in ballet, and for those thirty seconds or so, she’s like a human top in perpetual motion. 

Those spectacular turns are called fouettés, which means “whipped” in French, describing the dancer’s incredible ability to whip around without stopping. But while we’re marveling at the fouetté, can we unravel its physics? 

The dancer starts the fouetté by pushing off with her foot to generate torque. But the hard part is maintaining the rotation. As she turns, friction between her pointe shoe and the floor, and somewhat between her body and the air, reduces her momentum. So how does she keep turning? Between each turn, the dancer pauses for a split second and faces the audience. Her supporting foot flattens, and then twists as it rises back onto pointe, pushing against the floor to generate a tiny amount of new torque.

At the same time, her arms sweep open to help her keep her balance. The turns are most effective if her center of gravity stays constant, and a skilled dancer will be able to keep her turning axis vertical.

The extended arms and torque-generating foot both help drive the fouetté. But the real secret and the reason you hardly notice the pause is that her other leg never stops moving. During her momentary pause, the dancer’s elevated leg straightens and moves from the front to the side, before it folds back into her knee.

By staying in motion, that leg is storing some of the momentum of the turn. When the leg comes back in towards the body, that stored momentum gets transferred back to the dancer’s body, propelling her around as she rises back onto pointe.

As the ballerina extends and retracts her leg with each turn, momentum travels back and forth between leg and body, keeping her in motion. 

In Tchaikovsky’s ballet, the Black Swan is a sorceress, and her 32 captivating fouettés do seem almost supernatural. But it’s not magic that makes them possible. It’s physics.

From the TED-Ed Lesson The physics of the “hardest move” in ballet - Arleen Sugano 

Animation by Dancing Line Productions

Homemade Special Effects

Today, we’re hoping to inspire a little animated fun! We’re using a neat animation method called ‘pixilation’, in which humans are used as stop-motion puppets, to get from Point A to Point B. So grab your tablet or your smart phone or your camera, and come make human stop-motion with us!

Why walk there when you could slide there? Just like in stop-motion animation, the puppet moves just a bit for every photo that’s taken. So: Step to your left, Photo, Repeat!

Here’s the oldest trick in the ‘Special Effects’ book! In George Méliès’ ‘A Trip to the Moon’ from 1902, he infamously turn the camera off, had the subject leave the screen, and turned the camera back on to continue the shot, thus creating cinema’s first disappearing act! So, remember that film is just a series of photographs, and that you, too, can teleport!

Fly there! This one also counts as a daily work out. Just like we did in the slide, except with a jump! And a very well timed cameraperson… So: Step to your left, Jump, Photo, Repeat! You’ll notice we did a few jumping photos in place at the beginning and end to really make the puppet look like she can fly.

Have fun with it! What do you have in your home that you can play with and add to the animation?

Our favorite part about animation is that truly everything is possible! So whatever kooky idea you have, you can make happen with just a little planning and the right tools. 

For more details on how we made these animations, be sure to watch Animation basics: Homemade special effects - TED-Ed

Although everybody has a face-book,
all what I can read is:
“We all live crowded in a tight nook”.
Through their selfies,
I can see that
they are selfish.

Here on Giphy.

Original Illustration, by michaldziekan

Check here more about Michal Dziekan. Acid artwork!:

|| Official Web || Facebook || Tumblr || Flickr ||

January’s Sunday special is themed…

“I see you”

… and it’s all about portraits. So, if you made a portrait that you want us to consider to feature on a Sunday in January, either post it to your blog and use “pws special” as one of the first five tags, or submit it to our blog and check the “pws special” checkbox. And please don’t forget to add your Tumblr URL in the caption field

On our sister-blog @pwsfineartnudes that focuses on portraiture anyway, the January’s Sunday special is about the human body in “motion”.

PWS - Photos Worth Seeing

Gintama 618 translation

“A log can be a home a weapon or a vehicle, it’s really convenient”

Kyuube: with… with just one blow

Tojo: Nishino it’s been…

Daikini dude: I wonder if that was the last duty that the sky gave to you swords, your duty it’s pretty easy tho…

Minamito: You… bastard!!!

Kitaoji: Minamito!!

Minamito: How dare you to that to Nishino!!! How many enemies he just buried with one blow! oe strong is that?? If he would hit us with a bamboo stick nothing would change!! Will the Yagyuu’s godspeed be able to catch that heavy metal rod? !!

Keep reading

FREE SANTA.

>|<

EXCERPTS >|< The Singles Collection

Santa Claus vs The Devil (1959)


We invite you to watch the entire gif set HERE




EXCERPTS by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from out-of-copyright/historical/rare/controversial moving images. 
A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.
>|<

Excerpts >|< The Singles Collection

EXCERPTS >|< Breathing (1927)

Full GIF set here.

EXCERPTS by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from out-of-copyright/historical/rare/controversial moving images.
A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.
>|<