human footprints

Human footprints found on B.C. shoreline may be 13,000 years old

VICTORIA – Human footprints found embedded below the shoreline of a remote British Columbia island could be the oldest ever discovered in North America.

Researchers believe the fossilized footprints found on Calvert Island in Queen Charlotte Sound on B.C.’s Central Coast are over 13,000 years old, more than 2,000 years older than human imprints found in Mexico.
Archaeologist Duncan McLaren says the footprints are being tested for their age but charcoal found above the impressions was radiocarbon dated at 13,200 years old.

McLaren says about a dozen human footprints were found embedded and preserved in clay excavated below the high tide line on the island, an area that has seen little change despite ice ages and sea level shifts elsewhere. Read more.

globalnews.ca
Footprints found on B.C.’s Calvert Island may be oldest on continent
Evidence of what could be the oldest family camping trip in North America has been discovered below the shoreline of a remote B.C. island.
By globalnewsdigital

Evidence of what could be the oldest family camping trip in North America has been discovered below the shoreline of a remote British Columbia island.

Fossilized human footprints believed to be of a man, woman and child and estimated to be more than 13,000 years old were discovered at Calvert Island, which is located on B.C.’s central coast and is accessible only by boat or float plane.

Remnants of an ancient campfire were found nearby.

Archeologist Duncan McLaren said radiocarbon dating indicates the charcoal materials are 13,200 years old, and he is preparing to duplicate those tests to confirm the results.

“We’re very excited about it,” he said.

Fossilized human footprints, especially footprints more than 10,000 years old are rare. McLaren said the oldest human footprints in the Americas are 14,500 years old and were found at a site at Chile’s Monte Verde.

Continue Reading.

pasthorizonspr.com
800,000-year-old human footprints found in Norfolk

The oldest human footprints ever found outside Africa, dated at between 850,000 and 950,000 years old, have been discovered on the storm-lashed beach at Happisburgh in Norfolk, one of the fastest eroding stretches of the British coast. Within a fortnight the sea tides that exposed the prints last May destroyed them, leaving only casts and 3D images made through photogrammetry – by stitching together hundreds of photographs – as evidence that a little group from a long-extinct early human species had passed that way….

June 30th Gets a Leap Second Because Earth’s Rotation is Slowing Down

by Maddie Stone / Gizmodo

If you’re the sort of person who lives by the motto that every second counts, next week, you get to put your money where your mouth is. That’s because, as we first learned back in January, we’re all being gifted a leap second on June 30th.

Leap seconds can wreak havoc across the Internet, but, as NASA explained in detail this week, they’re essential in order to compensate for our planet’s slowing rotation.

SEE EARTH’S ROTATION & HUMANITIES FOOTPRINT

Most of us live our lives in the steadfast world of coordinated universal time (UTC), where Earth days are treated as precisely 86,400 seconds long. But in the real world, days haven’t been that long since about 1820. That’s because a gravitational tug-of-war between the Earth and the moon is causing our planet’s rotation to slow down, making the days a wee bit longer as the years roll on. Today, the average day is approximately 86,400.002 seconds long.

You might be thinking: Okay, that’s interesting, but who’s really counting? Scientists, of course! As NASA explains in the video below, Earth scientists monitor precisely how long it takes our planet to complete a full rotation (i.e., a day) using a technique called Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). This essentially involves collating data from a worldwide network of stations every single day. And the results are not always predictable. Day length, it turns out, is influenced by everything from tectonic activity to groundwater to El Nino events.

Read the entire article

Image above ©  Detlev van Ravenswaay / Science Source 

westerndigs.org
Ancient Human Footprints Found on Canadian Island May Be Oldest in North America
Tracks left on a beach by a man, a woman, and a child more than 13,000 years ago in British Columbia may be the oldest known human footprints in North America, archaeologists say.

Read on to see the prints, and learn what they may have to tell us about the paths of the earliest Americans.

vimeo

Could These Be the Oldest Human Footprints in North America?

Ancient coastal dwellers made tracks just below the tideline of an island off British Columbia but the big question is when

  • by Heather Pringle and Hakai Magazine

“Daryl Fedje was feeling his age, kneeling in a waterlogged pit, trowel in hand, mud everywhere, water pooling a dirty brown in the low spots. It was a cold, grey April morning on the central British Columbia coast, with rain lashing the overhead tarp, and Fedje, an archaeologist at the Hakai Institute and the University of Victoria, and one of Canada’s leading researchers on the early human history of the Americas, was duelling with doubt. Still lanky at 62, with grey hair curling out from his ball cap, he wondered yet again if he was wasting time and hard-to-find money chasing a figment of his imagination.

Fedje had been thinking about EjTa4, and what he’d seen there, for almost a year. Situated on remote Calvert Island, the site sprawled for nearly 150 meters along the shore, its massive, vegetation-shrouded midden looming over the water and its long abandoned garden nestling at the base. The immense midden, comprised of shells and other refuse, hinted at an ancient occupation. So a year ago, Fedje and his close friend Duncan McLaren, a fellow Hakai Institute and University of Victoria archaeologist, decided to search for the site’s earliest layer, digging a small test pit below the tideline. They hoped to find a few stone tools or butchered bones. But when Fedje got to the bottom of the pit, he saw something strange: a black impression in grey clay. It looked like a human footprint.  

McLaren took a photo, and, since time was running short, they filled in the pit and called it quits for the season. McLaren, however, thought the impression was worth another look. So in April this year, he and Fedje returned with a small team. After three days of digging through sand and gravel in a four-square-meter pit, Fedje reached the grey clay layer where he had spotted the strange shape a year earlier. The cautious scientist could scarcely believe his eyes. There wasn’t just one faint impression. There were 12.  Two footprints were side by side, others pointed in different directions; they were all near a stone-lined hearth. “You could see individual feet, you could see the heel pads, the toes, the arch of the foot,” Fedje says. “It was just mind-boggling.”

Just when ancient coastal dwellers made these tracks is now the big question. A tiny piece of charcoal found in the first footprint yielded a radiocarbon date of 13,200 years before present, suggesting that humans walked the shore of Calvert Island not long after the last Ice Age ended along the coast. But other stratigraphic evidence indicates that the footprints could be more recent, dating to about 2,000 years ago. Fedje and McLaren are now trying to hone the chronology. But if the impressions are conclusively dated to 13,200 years ago, they will the oldest known human footprints in North America. They would also be just 1,300 years younger than the oldest footprints in the New World, which were found at the site of Monte Verde in Chile during a dig led by Vanderbilt University archaeologist Tom Dillehay” (read more).

(Source: Scientific American)

Archeologist Duncan McLaren said radiocarbon dating indicates the charcoal materials are 13,200 years old, and he is preparing to duplicate those tests to confirm the results.

“We’re very excited about it,” he said.

Fossilized human footprints, especially footprints more than 10,000 years old are rare. McLaren said the oldest human footprints in the Americas are 14,500 years old and were found at a site at Chile’s Monte Verde.

Sites in Washington, Oregon and Alaska also confirm human activity more than 14,000 years ago but they do not have fossilized footprints, said McLaren.

Forbidden History - Footprints In Stone (Video)

That’s right. Human footprints in the fossil record. This video and website explore the phenomena of human footprints in the fossil record. Many and in fact most of these footprints are out of place. This means that the human footprints are in rock layers that are supposedly too old for modern human footprints to exist. http://b4in.com/gQpC