human rights and development

4

“i don’t have the tears to cry anymore. but…i at least have to keep yu safe” // “i promise you, mika. even if i have to sell out the whole world to do it, i’ll make sure you’re turned back into a human.”

A letter to all women
You are valuable. You were created to be light in this world, to bring joy, and on days that you can’t even pick yourself up, to let others know that life does not end there. That it’s also okay to break down for a little while, that we’ve all been there. Woman, you are free. Pay no attention to those, even fellow sisters, that tell you what to wear, what to do, how many boys or girls you can kiss before you officially become a slut, before you become used or impure. Do whatever feels right, feel whatever you truly want. Pay no attention to those who are capable of making the same mistakes as you but think they’re too perfect to ever fail. And maybe those mistakes aren’t even mistakes. Maybe it was just you, growing into the dazzling woman that you’re meant to be, maybe it was another experience in the book of all the things that you’ve done and that are to come. Maybe it was a lesson. Pay no attention to those that say you’re not as worthy as them, to those that tell you that you can’t be successful, smart enough, good enough, pretty enough. Rage. Fight. Live, breathe and cling to what you not only think but know that is fair, and not only fair, but merely human. Speak up. Resist. Engage, communicate and develop your right to rule your own body, to wear whatever you want knowing that if a person gets angry at you for being “provocative” it’s only their problem because they’re not enough of a respectful person to understand that you’re not “asking for it”, you’re just living. Wear whatever you want knowing that if someone makes fun of you, mistreats you or abuses you in any way because you chose to cover yourself up or dress yourself down, they just weren’t raised right, they just don’t know what it’s like to view things from different perspectives or just to be you. Shout. Protest. Be displeased, rebel and say no to people that think they have any kind of control over you. It’s your choice who you want to be with, it’s your choice if you want to keep the baby, it’s your choice if today you don’t want to go to the party, it’s your choice if you want to wear the sweatpants or the tight dress. It’s your choice if you’re going to let others rule your life or be enslaved by this intolerant world. Let your sisters know that we can’t afford to put each other down anymore. We can’t afford to keep on slut shaming when all we’re asking for is respect and we’re not giving it back, or setting the example to do so. We can’t afford to verbally abuse one another when all me might have needed was a little advice and a lot of support. We need to be there for every single woman out there because no one else is going to fight for equality or be informed of what equality really means, if we can’t even come together and stop fighting with each other instead of fighting towards a fair, respectful, equal and dignified world. Stop thinking that there’s already too many of us fighting for the cause and that you’re not needed, there aren’t enough people. We need every single woman helping, giving advice, letting people know of this injustice that we’re living, that not only because you’re comfortable and everyone accepts you as you are, does it mean that somewhere else in the world there aren’t girls who are not even allowed to dream. We stop being free when we give up our control. We stop being free when we remain quiet. We stop being free when we stand by and watch others live what you should or want to be living. We stop being free when we let comfort and tranquility seduce us into a life of nothingness. Be released.
—  macsun //m.ch

‘Developing’ countries are still 'developing’ because they are exploited by multinational corporations from rich 'developed’ countries.

Globalized capitalism paints a gruesome picture of the appalling, deadly practices these corporations engage in to use cheap labor and suppress any opposition through force.

The outsourcing of jobs from developed countries occurred when workers won their rights: protection from unsafe working conditions and products, a guaranteed wage, abolition of child labor, et cetera.

The fact that multinational corporations outsourced jobs to vulnerable developing countries where they can neglect basic human rights proves that capitalism is built on the backs of the poor, who suffer and starve despite resources being abundant.

Neoliberalism has identified exploited countries as 'developing’ to shift the blame and promote a disastrous agenda.

Arguments defending this exploitation usually are along the lines of “well, you can’t expect corporations to protect these people, it’s always the government who is at fault”. Those arguments prove that neoliberals have succeeded in their agenda.

Globalization, under capitalism, has not created a world government, but rather a connection between the ruling class worldwide, allowing for legal agreements that promote their interests above all.

Capitalism kills millions, regularly. Globalization has not only made that easier, it has legalized and normalized it.

2

demon or angel?? just playing around with some designs! it’s not something i do much, so i tried a cuter style for it. some thoughts on them under the cut!

Keep reading

How to be a Genuine and Fun-Loving Person

1. Value and respect the fact that you are a totally unique individual, with your own destiny to fulfill. Believe in who you are, what you think and believe, your gifts and talents, and what you have to offer to those around you.
2. Refuse to give into negative feelings of anxiety, self doubt or insecurity. In fact, “fake it till you make it” is often good advice … So, ignore how you feel, and act the way you want to be. Choose to switch off the old tapes that keep on playing in your head, and try to visualize your goals and then push on and seek to reach them.
3. Don’t pay any attention to what others think about you. The most important judgment should be yours, and yours alone. If you live in constant fear of what others think about you, it will only hold you back from realizing your potential. Also, you’re not a clone of others as each of us is different. Don’t be afraid to be unique or to stand out against the crowd.
4. Accept that you have good points, and areas for growth. We’re all a mix of different qualities, and flaws, and traits. We all make mistakes – it’s what you do with them matters – so embrace the fact you’re human and won’t always get it right.
5. Also, develop a tough skin and don’t take insults personally. Look back and laugh – don’t cower – or criticise yourself. It won’t help if you’re sensitive or worried all the time. It’s better to forgive yourself, and then move on again.
6. Develop your ability to think creatively. Try out those new ideas, and choose to live outside the box.
7. Seek to enjoy this moment, and to live life in the present. Be grateful for the small things, and savour all you have.

2

As of 2016, one in every 100 humans is now either a refugee, internally displaced, or seeking asylum. We, as Global Citizens, stand proudly with, and as supporters of, refugee communities and vulnerable populations, regardless of their religion or origin.

On 6/19, we’re hosting our first Issue Time conversation on our Tumblr page that will deal with how the global community can support, improve the position of and stand in solidarity with refugees, and communicate how and why refugees are human beings, just like us, first and foremost.

MEET OUR PANELISTS:

Madge Thomas, Deputy-Director of Global Policy and Advocacy, Global Citizen

Madge is the Deputy Director, Global Policy and Advocacy for Global Citizen and, together with the GPA Director, managers Global Citizen’s campaigning priorities in four countries. She also leads on Global Citizen’s campaigns on Global Education, including education in emergencies, basic education and girls’ education. Madge is a qualified lawyer with over ten years of experience in human rights, international affairs and development, including within the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT).

Piper Perabo; Actress, Activist, and IRC Voice; International Rescue Committee

Piper Perabo is a Golden Globe nominated actress. She can currently be seen opposite Antonio Banderas and Jonathan Rhys Meyers in Lionsgate’s BLACK BUTTERFLY, a remake of French thriller PAPILLON NOIR by Herve Korian. She made her Broadway debut in Neil LaBute’s controversial play REASONS TO BE PRETTY, which was nominated for the Tony for Best Play. Outside of her work on screen and stage, Perabo became an IRC Voice to raise awareness of the refugee crisis in Europe and help those displaced by conflict, religious persecution and political oppression around the globe.

Elmo, Sesame Street Muppet

Elmo is a 3 ½-year-old furry red monster who lives on Sesame Street. Elmo loves making new friends and recently visited refugee children and families in Jordan.

Sherrie Westin, EVP for Global Impact and Philanthropy, Sesame Workshop

Sherrie Rollins Westin is EVP, Global Impact and Philanthropy for Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind Sesame Street. Westin oversees the Workshop’s programs addressing the needs of children from India to South Africa to the U.S., providing early education through mass media and targeted initiatives. Under Westin’s leadership, Sesame Workshop and IRC are partnering to bring vital early learning and nurturing care to children and families affected by the ongoing civil war in Syria.

Yasmine Sherif, Director of Education Cannot Wait

Yasmine Sherif is the Director of Education Cannot Wait (ECW). A lawyer specialized in International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law (LL.M), she has over 25 years of experience with the United Nations (UNHCR, UNDP, OCHA) and international NGOs. Her expertise stretches across the humanitarian, development and peacekeeping spectrum, having served in some of the most crisis affected countries and regions on the globe, including Afghanistan, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Montenegro, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan, and across the Middle East, including Jordan (the Syria-crisis) and the occupied Palestinian territory, as well as in New York and Geneva. She has also worked as an Adjunct Professor responsible for the Masters Programme on the UN, humanitarian assistance and human rights at Long Island University (LIU), and has published extensively on international humanitarian and development issues, as well as international law. She is the author of the book, The Case for Humanity: An Extraordinary Session, which was launched at the United Nations in New York in 2015, a Huffington Post blogger, and has appeared in the media in Scandinavia, the US and Canada.

Stop constructing “lanes.” We can and should criticize sexism worldwide.

As usual, this post is primarily addressed to Western liberal feminists. I have noticed that one of your favorite lines that you smugly try and pass for discourse is “stay in your lane.” Men somewhere in the world are oppressing women somewhere in the world and when another person starts to criticize, you try to silence her with this “lane” nonsense.

Here’s the thing: Sexism and patriarchy don’t have a lane. They don’t have a culture. They are part of every culture, every place, and every system worldwide.

My oppression as a woman in Iraq has the same material problem as oppression of women in the United States, France, Argentina, China, Uganda, any society on this earth: male violence. The root of our problems is the same root and we will not solve any of these problems without pulling up that root.

You act like you’re some kind of progressive by silencing other Western women who talk about other cultures’ issues, but really you’re denying that all of our issues are rooted in the same oppression, and that is Western exceptionalism. You’re saying that your issues are worth public criticism but ours must be framed in ways that appeal to your moral senses or they should be silenced.

Global patriarchy is every woman’s “lane” because it’s literally global. I am allowed to criticize male violence anywhere in the world because I see a different manifestation of the same problems in my own life.

Sexism doesn’t have a culture. (Nor does racism, classism, homophobia, etc.) It exists in every culture in the world. For this reason, we cannot equate criticisms of sexism to criticisms of cultures because criticizing sexism criticizes every culture. (Or one global culture that we all share.) If you honestly believe that sexism is definitely wrong (which I do) then why are you silencing criticism of sexism?

Ask yourselves: Why are you so afraid of offending somebody’s “culture” by criticizing patriarchy? There can really only be one reason. Your feminism just appeals to men.

If our cultures can’t stand on their own without sexism, then what even are they? I love my culture. I love speaking Arabic and Assyrian. I love our folk music. I love our political novels and films. And I could still love all of this without sexism in our culture. Culture doesn’t exist in a snow globe. It is meant to change.

So are you actually going to let people defend sexism with “it’s our culture”? It’s everyone’s culture! And if we recognize that it’s wrong, we should criticize it! Just like we should criticize racism, classism, and homophobia wherever we find them. If you prioritize “protecting culture” over criticizing sexism, then you prioritize the feelings of men over the actual lives of women. And you aren’t a feminist.

I know I talk about listening to Middle Eastern women too, and I stand by that. You can and should listen to our stories, our thoughts, and our criticisms. And you can and should amplify our voices and offer your own criticisms of sexism, because sexism affects you too.

Issues with more attention usually get more support. People can’t support women in developing countries if they don’t know our struggles, and we cannot spread awareness if other women who discuss these issues are silenced. Western voices and media outlets have the most influence worldwide, so why are you stopping people from using them?

There is a difference between talking over someone and empathizing with her experience and offering meaningful criticisms. Talking over someone is a silencing tactic because you’re telling a woman not to talk about her lived experiences because you must know better. Listening to us, having a dialogue, and criticizing sexism together is productive and it’s the exact opposite of silencing. Stop trying to conflate the two.

You have an extremely low opinion of women from developing countries if you believe that criticizing how sexism manifests in our cultures is patronizing us. Do you think we don’t know what sexism is? Do you think we don’t also have indigenous feminist movements? Do you think we haven’t been trying to bring attention to these issues? 

It’s true that sometimes Westerners use sexism and homophobia in places like the Middle East as justifications for their own bigotry against Middle Eastern people. Again, if you honestly believe that racism, xenophobia, or imperialism are wrong, then you don’t need to dance around cultural sensitivities to make your point. The thing about inalienable human rights is that you don’t have to earn them.

Half of people in developing countries are women and you can advocate for our liberation in all countries of the world at the same time. Wow! There’s a massive difference between acknowledging how sexism manifests in some cultures and saying we’re savages who should be confined to dangerous war zones.

Stop dividing women. We are in this together. Sexism is wrong in every context and every culture and we are allowed to criticize it wherever and whenever we find it.

anonymous asked:

First of all I want to say you guys are awesome and it means so much how you're our allies in these politically turbulent times. Is it alright if I ask something from all of you? If so, what event(s) in your life steered you to use your platform to support LGBT?

Back in the mid 80’s I was a young police officer with the Lafayette Police Department. One evening while dealing with a suicidal person I was deliberately exposed to the AIDS virus. The circumstances of this situation made national news.  I was treated by my peers as though I had been infected by the AIDS virus and was HIV-positive. With the exception of my family and my close personal friends, the only group in our community to provide unconditional support was our LGBTQ community. For that I will be forever in their debt and whenever possible, I will be their champion.

When serving on Council, my district was made up of people of all backgrounds, but a large population of the LGBT community found comfort in a neighborhood called Shadyside, which was a part of my Council District. The community helped to revitalize the neighborhood and they brought vibrancy to the East End of Pittsburgh. My District even hosted the first Pride event in Pittsburgh, which is now draws thousands of people each year.

I’ve long been a supporter of the LGBTQ community. For me, it wasn’t a specific event so much as a strong belief in justice, equality, and the value of all people. As a Latino, I understand, on a personal level, how harmful bias and discrimination can be. Those of us with the privilege to speak up against it have an obligation to do so.

Before I joined the City government, I worked as a lawyer for the Asian Law Caucus, fighting for the rights of immigrants and tenants facing racism and eviction. As someone who has witnessed discriminatory acts firsthand, I am determined to fight against that kind of action in all forms. My experience as the Executive Director of the Human Rights Commission also helped develop a strong sense of fairness and equality for all. I am driven by the belief that everyone deserve equal rights and treatment, regardless of gender, race, immigration status, religion, or sexual identity. Finally, as a longtime resident of San Francisco, I have grown close with so many members of the LGBTQ community, and I could not in good conscious allow policies that would harm those people.

youtube

5 Crazy Ways Social Media Is Changing Your Brain Right Now 


YouTube Source Channel: AsapSCIENCE

It doesn’t make sense at all… Why would you make their characters develop and then fuck it up in 2 seconds?! Eva went back to that toxic relationship and Chris went back to being a total fuckboy. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE! Ok, I understand that maybe Julie didn’t want to make them happen, and it’s ok, I get it, but she could have just left them like that, not erase everything for this shit. I’m not pissed because mohnstad didn’t happen, I’m actually pissed because they threw their development as human beings right in the trash. So everything we thought was real was actually just a lie, Eva from season 1 is still there, and so is Chris. I’m not okay right now…

Handedness arises from genes in the spinal cords of embryos

Our nervous systems have left-right differences that are important for correct functioning. Handedness is probably the best-known asymmetry arising from the development of the nervous system. This is observed very early on: embryos of eight weeks already tend to move their right arms more often than their left arms. At this ‘age’ signals are not sent from the brain to the arms yet, but only from the spinal cord. A few weeks later, left-right differences also become visible in the shape and size of the premature brain.

A team of scientists from the Netherlands, the UK and China searched for genes that contribute to left-right differences in the nervous system, in the period between four and eight weeks after fertilisation. The genetic analysis showed that the left and right sides of the spinal cord develop at different paces.

The left side of the spinal cord matures slightly faster than the right side. Sets of key genes that control growth and maturity were found to reach a more advanced profile of activity on the left side than the right. In the hindbrain, an area which is the predecessor for some adult parts of the brain, this was the other way around.

“This seems logical, since many nerve fibers cross over from one side to the other at the boundary between the hindbrain and spinal cord,” says Carolien de Kovel, lead author of the study and researcher at the Max Plank Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI). “How exactly this left-right genetic difference in the spinal cord leads to right-handedness is, however, not yet clear.”

Clyde Francks, head of the MPI research group ‘Brain and behavioral asymmetries’ and Research Fellow at the Donders Institute at the Radboud University, explains, “We think that these very early left-right differences in the spinal cord may act to trigger some of the later asymmetries of the brain, such as the eventual dominance of the left hemisphere for language functions in most adults’.

Asymmetry and schizophrenia
"Around 85% of humans are right-handed; it seems the standard in human development,” De Kovel adds, “but genetic and environmental factors may provide alternative paths of development, such as left-handedness or two-handedness. Interestingly, disturbances in such asymmetries seem to be more common in people with psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia.”

Hence, De Kovel and her colleagues also compared the results of their study with genetic factors that influence the risk of schizophrenia. It was found that genes which exhibit the largest left-right differences in the embryos also tended to be involved in the risk of schizophrenia. “The findings do not prove directly that these genes cause schizophrenia by their actions in the spinal cord, because the same genes are also active in the grown-up brain. However this does provide us with clues on which we can base further research,” De Kovel explains.

theguardian.com
Tilos, Greece: the first island in the Med to run entirely on wind and solar power

You’re more likely to run into friendly partridges, rare orchids and endangered eagles than people as you trek around Tilos. The entire Dodecanese island is a nature reserve, with more than 150 species of resident and migratory birds, over 650 plant varieties, and a permanent population hovering around 500. Tilos owes its extraordinary biodiversity to a network of underground springs that feed five wetlands – but also to the late mayor, Tassos Aliferis, a committed environmentalist who earned Tilos its reputation as “Greece’s green island”.

Aliferis banned hunting in 1993. (He also conducted the first same-sex marriages in Greece in 2008 long before they became legal in 2015.) The current mayor, Maria Kamma, continues to champion sustainable development, and human rights. She has extended an open invitation to refugee families to settle on Tilos, working with the NGO SolidarityNow and the UNHCR to establish sheltered accommodation, language classes and mentoring schemes to help asylum-seekers set up organic farming businesses in partnership with locals.

10

MAKING A WAY: LESBIANS OUT FRONT
Photographs by JEB (Joan E. Biren)

  1. Archene Turner and Lynn Walker share a sweet moment in the backyard of their home in Atlanta, Georgia. 1987.
  2. Ana Maldonado, physician associate and women’s health care specialist, provides lesbian health service at the Santa Cruz Women’s Health Center. Here she assists a client in seeing her cervix. California, 1986.
  3. Colevia Carter, D.C. human rights commissioner, poet, and human resource developer for the D.C. prison system, attends the Human Rights Campaign Fund dinner in 1984. Colevia also developed AIDS education programs for the Black community in Washington D.C.
  4. Del Martin and Pyllis Lyon have been domestic partners since Valentine’s Day, 1953. In 1955, they co-founded the Daughters of Bilitis (DOB), the oldest lesbian organization in the U.S. Here at Habromania House (habromania: having delusions of a pleasing nature), their San Francisco home, Del and Phyllis pause in the midst of their many movement activities. 1984.
  5. Anna Marie Rechichi works as a welder for a large crane manufacturer. She is an active member of Cleveland’s Hard Hatted Women and Older Wiser Lesbians. Anna Marie also volunteers with Oven Productions, which produces women’s cultural events in Cleveland, Ohio. 1986.
  6. Eleanor N. Soto takes a turn on the 24-hour crisis line at the Mid-Peninsula Support Network in Mountain View, California. Eleanor was co-director of this agency, which serves battered women and their children. 1986.
  7. Friends Kim Samsel and Robin Ching get together for conversation in American Sign Language. Baltimore, Maryland. 1987.
  8. Mona Bachmann is part of a crew patching the roof of a friend’s house in preparation for a community Fourth of July celebration in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana. 1987.
  9. Mary, KD, and Boo end a full day of work and play with music. These “valley girls” have been together, building a community of women, for ten years. Stevensville, Montana, 1987.
Unpopular opinion

I don’t think flushing the yeerk pool at the end of the series makes Jake a war criminal. Was it fucked-up? Sure. Was it ruthless? Undoubtedly. Were there better ways to end the war? Probably.

But at the end of the day, Jake and the Animorphs were sixteen years old. They were children. They were child soldiers, who had been fighting since they were thirteen, and. How must that have affected their development? How did the war, the siege state that Jake lived in at his own home, the fear and terror and hatred, affect them?

And that’s not even considering that the magnitude of his actions probably didn’t even register until much, much later. At sixteen your brain isn’t even really equipped yet to truly understand death in the way a twenty year old would. In fact, not even your empathy nor impulse control is completely developed yet at that age. Add to it PTSD, depression, anxiety, insane levels of stress, the responsibility of the entire human race, his family having been taken, his brother, his cousin, and what do you get? A very angry, unstable teenager. A child soldier thinking in absolute terms.

I wanted to yell at the stupid prosecutor who accused Jake of being just like Visser One, because you have an adult colonizer on one hand, and a child soldier on the other, and it’s not the same at all.

What he did was terrible and I’m not sure I would be able to even live with myself in the aftermath of it, but I just can’t categorize a child as a war criminal, given the circumstances and the knowledge we have of human development and the fact that he had every right to be as angry as he was, and he wasn’t an adult to pull back and say HEY I SHOULD BE THE BIGGER MAN HERE. He was a child and although what he did was horrifying, I’d never be able to compare him to Visser One or call him a war criminal.

Madge Thomas is the Deputy Director, Global Policy and Advocacy for Global Citizen. She leads on Global Citizen’s campaigns on Global Education, including education in emergencies, basic education and girls’ education. Madge is a qualified lawyer with over ten years of experience in human rights, international affairs and development, including within the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). Ask Madge your questions about how you can help vulnerable populations all over the world here: http://glblctzn.me/2sBnC4x

“We do not live by bread alone. True, existence is not possible without opportunity to satisfy our physical needs. But the gratification of these by no means constitutes all of life. Our present system of disinheriting millions, made the belly the centre of the universe, so to speak. But in a sensible society … the feelings of human sympathy, of justice and right would have a chance to develop, to be satisfied, to broaden and grow.”
- Alexander Berkman, ABC of Anarchism, p. 15

Sword Fact #19:

Swords have had handles longer than humans have had hands. The need for defense and safety helped humans to evolve and develop hands that are just the right shape for sword handles. Nature never ceases to amaze me.

FUN FACT: The word “hand” is derived from the word “handle”. It is safe to say without handles, we wouldn’t even have hands!