human connectivity

the idea that connected humans form another higher-level organism baffles me, because while it’s vacuously true, the higher organism would have nothing in common with us and would not share our interests or preferences except at the most superficial level.

my aim w this project (the monster project) is to find/make a space where the transsexual belongs which is not theoretical, pornographic or symbolic but instead built on the mutual human connection that I believe theatre can facilitate

Rick Sanchez, Don Draper, and BoJack Horseman are three examples of a popular male character trope: the intelligent, talented, toxic, disconnected, detached man who fails to connect with others and is consistently and wildly self destructive in his quest to fill an emotional void with anything but human connection.

The problem with this character archetype lies with the fans, insofar as a lot of people, a specific subset of men in particular, miss the entire point of the character.

They’re so easily sucked in by the flashy veneer of masculine bravado on the surface of these damaged characters that they fail to understand why the characters are presented this way: you do not want to be like them. You are not supposed to identify with them positively or see them as someone to emulate, you are not supposed to sincerely root for them to win most of the time, they are antiheros.

In spite of being the protagonist Rick, Don, and BoJack are almost never the “good guy” in any given scenario, they are almost always selfishly motivated, and explicitly harming innocent people for their own gain. The rare moments of redemption usually don’t last.

Idolizing and lionizing these characters as an ideal or something to aspire to entirely misses the concept of the characters, and worse, celebrates behavior that is explicitly shown to be toxic and harmful.

If you identify as “a Rick” then the entire concept of the show has gone completely over your head. The creators of all three shows position their characters clearly, and get more blatant with each season.

To be clear, seeing negative traits in yourself and identifying with the struggle to improve them, or wanting these characters to change and grow is not what we’re referring to here, but rather the explicit support for and celebration of these characters as they are. This isn’t even a critique of the characters themselves. All of whom are well written, interesting, and complex, but rather it’s a critique of how we see and interpret these characters. This archetype applies to many characters like Sherlock, House, and Archer, and is also mirrored in family members like Beth to Rick or Mycroft to Sherlock. Liking these characters is fine. Enjoying them ia fine, but acknowledge what they are.
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This is our library here in Spring, Texas, in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. When I think of people who have lost everything, I hate how sad I feel about a library. But this is where I’ve taken my kids for story time since they were infants. It’s where I’ve met my closest mom friends. It’s a place that means the world to me.
But beyond that, this is a place that my community needs. It offers free educational programming, resources, information, language classes, Internet, human connection, a place that is clean and safe, free lunches for kids in the summer when school is out. It’s not just a bunch of books. For some people, the library is their only access to these things.

The Wakandan Royal Portrait offers clues to the dangers within the fictional nation

T’CHALLA

“What makes him different from other superheroes first and foremost is he doesn’t see himself as a superhero,” says director and co-writer Ryan Coogler (Fruitvale Station, Creed). “He sees himself as a politician. That’s the first thing on his mind when he wakes up in the morning. ‘How am I going to fulfill my duties as king of this place?’”

That means not just fighting external foes, but keeping the citizens of his nation happy. He’s a king, but not a tyrant. And Wakandans don’t speak with only one voice. There are many political factions, many clashing points of view. Some are ready for revolution. Some are being pushed.

“He has to keep harmony between the tribes within his country, and that means managing expectations and doing things that are unpopular,” Coogler says. “At the same time, he is the protector of that nation.”

RAMONDA

Angela Bassett costars as Ramonda, once the queen, now the mother of the king.

“She is one of the advisors that he would look to,” Boseman says. “He has to look to her for some of the answers of what his father might want or might do. She may not be exactly right all the time, but she definitely has insights. She is the queen mother. And she’s that for not just him, but for everybody.”

Bozeman laughs. “She’s has her hands in everything — even his love life.”

NAKIA

“The one thing I will say about all the female characters in this movie is that they are very strong,” Boseman says. “It’s a very matriarchal society.”

One of them is Wakanda’s undercover operative Nakia, played by 12 Years a SlaveOscar-winner Lupita Nyong’o. She may actually be the closest thing to 007 in this movie, and she’s a former lover of T’Challa’s.

“She is a departure from what she was in the comic book,” Nyong’o says. “Nakia is a war dog. She is basically an undercover spy for Wakanda. Her job is to go out into the world and report back on what’s going on.”

She also boasts some unique weaponry. “We call them her ring blades,” says Moore. “The ones Lupita carries while in the green outfit are based on traditional African weaponry. However, she does get a hi-tech upgrade later in the film, compliments of Shuri.”

SHURI

Letitia Wright plays T’Challa’s kid sister, who is no one you want to face in battle either. “She is also a genius and runs the entire Wakandan design group,” says producer Kevin Feige, whose also president of Marvel Studios and one of the chief architects of its interlocked universe. “She’s responsible for all these amazing technological advances that Vibranium has brought about from Wakanda.”

Here she is pictured with twin, panther-shaped weapons. It’s not clear yet what they do exactly, but it probably hurts.

OKOYE

She’s not technically family, but she’s just as close. This character played by The Walking Dead‘s Danai Gurira is the head of the Dora Milaje, the all-female special soldiers unit that protects the kingdom (and the king) from harm.

“They are a very powerful force,” she says. “They are not utopic, but what Wakanda has down well is it has allowed people to function within their strengths. These women, their strength is to preserve Wakanda. It’s more like the secret service in a sense that it’s not just military. She is head of intel.”

Okoye has guilt over the death of the previous king, and she’s generally a stoic presence. But she’s not unfeeling. “She can be serious, but she also has an unexpected sense of humor,” Gurira says. “She has a heart, but for her country and for her people. She’s not a person who doesn’t connect to human beings as a result of what she does.”

ERIK KILLMONGER

There is an enemy in this portrait.

In the comics, he was once a Wakandan known as N’Jadaka, but he took on this “death-dealing” nom de guerre when he became a dissident, then an exile, from his homeland.

Michael B. Jordan’s character is one of the antagonists of the film, allied with the mercenary Ulysses Klaue (Andy Serkis, reprising his role from Avengers: Age of Ultron), an arms dealer who has plundered Vibranium before and plans to do it again. He’s addicted.

In The Godfather terms, Killmonger has sided with this outsider against “the family,” his brothers and sisters of Wakanda. “I think Killmonger has his own opinion on how Wakanda has been run and should run, and what I think Michael brings to the table is sort of a charming antagonist, who doesn’t agree with how T’Challa is running things, frankly,” says Moore. “I think that puts T’Challa in a difficult situation. Killmonger is a voice of a different side of Wakanda.”

W’KABI

Get Out star Daniel Kaluuya plays T’Challa’s best friend, who is also a member of one of the most vital groups in the nation. “W’Kabi is the head of security for the Border Tribe,” says Moore. “They live on the borders of Wakanda and serve as the first line of defense for the country.”

In other words, he helps maintain the disguise that Wakanda is just mines, farms, and woods.

“To outsiders they appear to be what people would ‘expect’ of a small provincial African nation – but the truth is they are some of the fiercest warriors in Wakanda, intent on protecting the secrets of their advanced nation at all costs,” Moore says.

Now that T’Challa is king, he asks W’Kabi to join him as a palace advisor.

ZURI

Another vital voice of reason for the young king is Forest Whitaker’s shaman, a longtime advisor to T’Challa’s father and the keeper of the Heart-Shaped Herb, a plant that grows only in Wakanda and absorbs the Vibranium-rich minerals. When consumed, it gives the new leader superhuman strength. (But in the comics, it only works on members of the royal bloodline.)

“He’s somewhat a religious figure or spiritual figure,” Coogler says of Zuri. “Spirituality is something that exists in Wakanda in the comics, and it’s something we wanted to have elements of in the film. Forest’s character, more than anything, is a major tie-back to T’Challa’s father. Zuri is someone he looks to for guidance.”

As wondrous as Wakanda seems, it can also be treacherous. For all the talk of honor in The Godfather, the families were compulsively driven to destroy each other. 007 may venture to the most beautiful places (and people) on Earth, but there’s always a villain determined to wipe those places off the map. If Black Panther owes thematic inspiration to those predecessors, the danger comes hand in hand with the beauty.

But that’s where the similarities will end. When the Marvel Studios movie debuts Feb. 16, the story will remain on Earth, but its creators pledge to take fans to a world they’ve never seen before nonetheless.

“I don’t think people are prepared for what this movie is going to be,” says Feige. “Not just Black Panther, but the Dora Milaje, and Killmonger, and the entire design of Wakanda – both its traditional African-inspired elements, but also the Vibranium inspired techno-elements. I can’t think of a blend that has happened like that before in movies.”

There’s only one Black Panther, after all.

No matter who wants to lay claim to his throne.

The Truth About Zodiac Stereotypes

Aries: People assume you’re immature or childish. The truth is, you often can tell when people need a boost, and you do your best to cheer them up. Physical activity is your outlet for any stress you have. You can appear selfish because you’re often discredited or overlooked.

Taurus: People assume you are stubborn and obsessed with food. The truth is, you’re only stubborn because you’ve already taken the other person into consideration. You’re not just obsessed with food, you have a passion for everything and can find pleasure in the little things.

Gemini: People assume you’re heartless, a gossip, and unable to commit. The truth is you don’t mean to hurt people. You just don’t want to settle for less than what you deserve. You don’t like secrets and like for everything to be out in the open– that’s the best way to solve problems in your eyes.

Cancer: People assume that you’re overly sensitive and a crybaby. The truth is, you’re the closest sign to being psychic. You have a deep intuition for the emotions of others and that can be overwhelming. You rarely cry when you’re sad; you cry only when you’re frustrated because you put other people’s well being before your own, and often times it comes back against you.

Leo: People assume you’re a diva or too bossy. The truth is that you know your worth. You refuse to be mistreated, but what other people don’t often see is that you also want other people to be treated well too. You appear bossy because you know your heart is in the right place, and you want to be leader of the pack because you have the best intentions for everyone within your circle.

Virgo: People assume that you’re boring and monotonous and have a general sterile attitude about you. The truth is, you’ve found a groove that works for you and you stick to it. Why fix something that isn’t broken? Far from boring, you appreciate other people’s beauty and art so much that you often forget about your own talents.

Libra: People assume that you’re a flip flopper and somewhat of an airhead. The truth is, you want to see all sides of the story before you make a choice on what you believe. Your opinion may change as you learn more. You’re very intelligent, and often focus on the big picture, which may cause you to overlook the smaller things.

Scorpio: People assume that you’re promiscuous and have dark thoughts and bad intentions. The truth is all you want is to be loved. You need that human connection and crave monogamous passionate relationships. You have a deep sense of pride, and when people hurt you, putting a wall up and throwing rocks over the edge to destroy whoever let you down is your best defense mechanism.

Sagittarius: People assume that you’re aloof, unloyal, and a flake. The truth is you have so many dreams you want to fulfill, and you don’t let anyone get in the way of your path in life. Your eye is always on the horizon. You don’t hurt people intentionally, but you often blurt hurtful comments out. Unlike Gemini, you go straight to the source, but with the same intentions. You believe people deserve the truth.

Capricorn: People assume that you’re cold, and dull, and only a fair weather friend. The truth is that it hasn’t always been that way. In youth, Capricorn is eager to please others and wants to be appreciated. You’ve often been let down, and use coldness as a defense. Once others gain your trust, you are intensely loyal and want nothing but to take care of your partner or friends.

Aquarius: People assume that you aren’t ever serious, or generally basic (only following trends). The truth is you don’t disclose your goals or dreams because you don’t want pressure from others, or you don’t want to disappoint them if you fail. You’d much rather help others reach their goals. You keep up with trends because you have an open mind and you embrace change in a positive way.

Pisces: People assume that you’re naive and always have your head in the clouds. The truth is that you believe what you focus on and think about is what comes to be. You try to stay positive, because if you focus on negativity you become easily overwhelmed. It doesn’t mean that you’re blind to it. Because of this sensitivity, you often cope by finding ways to escape mentally whether by reading or listening to music etc, which benefits you because you’re more inclined to have artistic talent, and you crave the inspiration.

One of my favorite tidbits of HxH is the fact that Gon and Killua became friends because Gon talked to him during the exam and just “Hey we’re the same age! That’s a good reason to be friends let’s do that! :D”

And since Gon came from a small island and is friendly to a fault, it kinda makes sense for him to suggest it. I bet on Whale Island people more or less just made friends with those close in age due to limited options.

But what cracks me up is Killua. Killua “raised from age 2 to commit cold-blooded murder, extensively trained in the art of throat-slitting, shamed out of emotion and friendship despite his desire for human connection” Zoldyck was just like “:)??? :D?????”

The Zoldycks tried.

i feel like i love differently than others. while some are swept away by romance and love love, i’m more about the connection i have with my significant other, how at ease i am with them, how effortless it is with them. i put more importance on spending time with them and enjoying them, i’m thankful for them, for how safe they make me feel and how caring and thoughtful they are

Mikasa meets the cruel world: Attack on Titan in a nutshell

More intelligent people than me have probably pointed this out long before me, but it still amazes me how much Mikasa’s upbringing truly is a metaphor for the entire series.

We start of with this carefree, peaceful family living in this isolated cabin in the woods, distanced from the outside. A comfortable existence, but their family is well aware that beyond their warm home lie problems: the Ackerman clan is still thought to be prosecuted, and Asians are sought by traffickers for their rare appearance and blood–they’re a different race, and this is useful to some.

And then one peace is interrupted: three men break in, destroying comfort and killing innocent people, and they’re there solemnly because of the physical aspects of the family, their rare appearance. Through this experience, Mikasa lost her hope and will to live, and also got to understand the cruel nature of the world she lived in. 

And then, a sudden event that changed the course of that day. The young Eren Jaeger barges in, takes out the oppressive intruders, and most importantly, restores hope to her. Just like the kidnappers, Eren came from outside of her world…but instead of bringing her more cruelty, Eren brought Mikasa a way to go against said cruelty–to fight back. The world is cruel and brutal and it crushes the weak–thus, the only way to survive is to fight back against the oppression–and that’s what Mikasa proceeds to do.

This precise event can be translated with total accuracy into the entirety of the story–it’s the exact same thing the walled world went through. The walldians lived in peace and comfort (more or less), isolated from the rest of the world, because the outside meant danger for them. We’ve always known this danger to be the titans–the basement taught us the reality though. The entire outside world has a pre-determined relationship with the walldians–not because of who, but because of what they are. Some see them as danger and want them extinct for safety measures, some see them as useful tools for their own purposes. 

Does this sound familiar? Ackermans are prosecuted because they’re a danger to the kings rule, and Asians are sought after because their origin makes them different. Mikasa’s family is a metaphor for all walldians, for all those wanted dead by the world or used as weapons in Marley’s titan army. Their situation is identical too: they live excluded from the outside world, in a pseudo-peace, which is one day interrupted by the arrival of three outsiders (kidnappers, RBA). Through their actions, those outsiders remind the inhabitants of the cruel, oppressive world they find themselves in (a grim reminder). And then, another outsider appears, restoring hope and teaching the oppressed how to free themselves: to fight. This is Eren when he barges into the cabin, and Grisha, originally from beyond the walls. when he entrusts the founding and attack titans to Eren, who would later become humanities hope and, in some way, inspires them to fight back. Both of these stories are perfect parallels.

It’s also definitely not a coincidence that the Eren-saves-Mikasa flashback was included in Isayama’s first draft of chapter 1, in flashback format. All the dialogue about Mikasa being part of a nearly extinct, different race, and Eren telling her to fight back, were there from day one. In the present time she even says that she believes Eren has the strength to overcome the world’s issues and bring hope to mankind–an even stronger parallel between her situation and all of walldia. 

Heck, it certainly isn’t a coincidence either that, during ch 14, primordial desire, aka humanities first ever victory against oppression and the first climax of the story, Eren flashes back to that very moment

On one hand it sets up other humans, aka Marley as antagonists, who’re oppressing Paradis due to the blood flowing through its inhabitants. At the same time, it redraws all the parallels mentioned beforehand by straight up comparing humanities struggle to that struggle in the woods. 

These two panels really affirm everything I mentioned above–Mikasa’s “origin story” is it’s own microcosm that foretells the entire core struggle of the series: Eldians seeking freedom from oppression. And the fact that such an early scene remains a total metaphor to the story even 90 chapters and a ton of plot twists and revelations later, just goes to show how much of a thought out story attack on titan has been for the longest time. 

anonymous asked:

Do you think it is wrong (anti-revolutionary, or immoral) for a bi woman, who has the choice to love other women, to love men? If a woman could choose to only prioritize other women, why wouldn't she? I'm not talking about situations when a woman is coerced to be with a man. Some bi women actually love individual men. Should they?

It is not wrong, anti-revolutionary, or immoral for individual bi women to pursue happy and healthy relationships with people regardless of their gender. The burden of being constantly Radical ™ or Revolutionary ™ is unrealistic and, frankly, dehumanizing. Prioritizing women as a woman can take many different forms, obviously including romantic and sexual but not merely romantic or sexual. If a bi woman loves a man individually, she is not less bi for it or immoral or impure. Certainly it’s worth examining why some bi women may consistently date men - because of compulsory heterosexuality and other societal pressures - but scrutinizing the interpersonal choices bi women make is not revolutionary in the slightest. There are multiple circumstances surrounding all women, including bi women, and their “feminist” card or, if they’re LGBT, they’re “LGBT” card, should not be “revoked” on the basis of genuine human connections. 

You should examine why you’re asking this question specifically about bi women. Hint: it’s because you don’t view bi women as actual human beings capable of manifesting complex desires, and rather you view them as failed heterosexuals or failed sapphic women who are tied to men no matter what they say or do. The fact that you and other biphobes only discuss bi women in this context but never straight women in this context reveals that bi women are always reduced to men and thus stripped of their autonomy. In that way, biphobic rhetoric is misogynistic, and people who perpetrate it (like you) are hypocritical and cruel.