human!samulet

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The fight for access to clean water is far from over and the media need to make sure it’s covered every step of the way. 

It occurs to me that as much as “humans are the scary ones” fits sometimes, if you look at it another way, humans might seem like the absurdly friendly or curious ones.

I mean, who looked at an elephant, gigantic creature thoroughly capable of killing someone if it has to, and thought “I’m gonna ride on that thing!”?

And put a human near any canine predator and there’s a strong chance of said human yelling “PUPPY!” and initiating playful interaction with it.

And what about the people who look at whales, bigger than basically everything else, and decide “I’m gonna swim with our splashy danger friends!”

Heck, for all we know, humans might run into the scariest, toughest aliens out there and say “Heck with it. I’m gonna hug ‘em.”

“Why?!”

“I dunno. I gotta hug 'em.”

And it’s like the first friendly interaction the species has had in forever so suddenly humanity has a bunch of big scary friends.

eurekalert.org
Monkey speak: Macaques have the anatomy, not the brain, for human speech
"If a species as old as a macaque has a vocal tract capable of speech, then we really need to find the reason that this didn't translate for later primates into the kind of speech sounds that humans produce," she said. "I think that means we're in for some exciting new answers soon."

Monkeys known as macaques possess the vocal anatomy to produce “clearly intelligible” human speech but lack the brain circuitry to do so, according to new research.

The findings – which could apply to other African and Asian primates known as Old World monkeys – suggest that human speech stems mainly from the unique evolution and construction of our brains, and is not linked to vocalization-related anatomical differences between humans and primates, the researchers reported Dec. 9 in the journal Science Advances.

Co-corresponding author Asif Ghazanfar, a Princeton University professor of psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, said that scientists across many disciplines have long debated if – and to what extent – differences between the human and primate vocal anatomy allow people to speak but not monkeys and apes.

“Now nobody can say that it’s something about the vocal anatomy that keeps monkeys from being able to speak – it has to be something in the brain. Even if this finding only applies to macaque monkeys, it would still debunk the idea that it’s the anatomy that limits speech in nonhumans,” Ghazanfar said. “Now, the interesting question is, what is it in the human brain that makes it special?”

Continue Reading.

Stayed up super late making this for @fuckyeahkasumisty​. I tried really hard on it, and a wonderful friend of mine helped me draw Finn because god knows I can’t draw him at all for some reason… But I just really hope that this could brighten your day up even by a little bit.