hue and saturation

hey guys! i’ve noticed lately that a lot of gifsets/edits of moana, especially pastel ones, have been whitewashing her skin, and i know that this isn’t just a problem in moana gifs, so i thought it might be a good idea to make a comprehensive guide on how to avoid whitewashing poc/color poc in general. this guide will be split into three parts: vibrant gifs, pastel gifs, and dark gifs (any of the tips i give for gifs can be applied to edits as well – it’s even easier to avoid whitewashing poc in edits, because you can color it normally and then erase the lightening layers over the person’s skin).

so, without any further ado, here we go!

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Prepping your print from file to finish:

I always hear people complaining about how much better the piece looked digitally, SO, here is a run down on how to get prints that look more like your original piece.

First of all, every printer is different.  Every paper is different.  Make sure you take the time to do test prints and become familiar with how your printer and paper combo work, as you’ll rarely nail a print your first try.  This one took about 5 test prints before I was confident to print on the expensive large paper Every time I mess up on a print, I save the remaining paper to use as scraps for test prints.

As you can see, the original piece looks very nice!  The focus is super strongly on the tiger, and all of the vibrant colors are still super evident in the background.  That said, when I print it as is, everything about 85% gray or darker turns BLACK.  And this is high quality paper designed to get accurate vibrant colors, too.

The best way to fix this is to do layer effects.  Brightness/contrast is my favorite, as a typical piece will generally print about 5x better if you up the brightness to around 15-25, and adjust the contrast up or down by 5-10 points.  That said, if you have a HIGH contrast piece (Darks against brights) like this one, you typically need to do a few more steps.

Often I’ll do a second brightness/contrast adjustment layer and push brightness to an obnoxious level so the darkest darks are closer to a mid-dark range.  From there, I’ll create a mask and use a transparent gradient tool to slowly pull back the brightness on all of the lighter areas of the image.

Additionally, due to printers using CMYK and your screen being RBG certain colors just physically CANNOT print.  Some people will always work in CMYK because of this, but honestly I like my saturated colors and most of my work is intended to be seen digitally so I only ever work in RGB.  Photoshop has a nifty toggle (Ctrl + Y) where you can toggle between CMYK and RGB view to see how your piece will appear when it prints.  It’s useful to check this because if you worked in a color that cannot replicate in print, you may want to shift it entirely before you even bother printing.

Artwork tends to desaturate a bit as it prints, so I’ll often make a Hue/saturation layer to play with, too.  In this case the image was already pretty damn saturated, BUT some of the shadows on the tiger were printing more brown than orange, so I adjusted the saturation a bit to keep them vibrant with the rest of the image.
**DO NOT use “Lightness” to lighten your image!  It basically adds a white overlay to your image.  Always use Brightness, instead.

After all of that, I have a final print that much more closely captures the essence of the original painting.  I could have tinkered even more, but to me the goal is a good print rather than an exact copy. 

For ULTRA high contrast images, like a dark room looking out into a snowy exterior, expect to do a LOT of adjustment to get it to print correctly.  Printers just aren’t too fond of super darks right up against super lights.

I could make a proper tutorial on this if people request it.  Mostly, just wanted to put my thoughts down in one spot!

anonymous asked:

Stumbled across your art recently, and I totally admire your work! As a complete noob to the digital art scene, I'd just like to ask whether you have any tips on colour picking (like for skin tones, under varied/dramatic lighting and such!). I have a ton of other things I want to ask, but I'll limit myself to one question and then try to google the rest, haha/ Thanks for sharing your art with us! ^^

ahh thank you so much! ♥ welcome to the digial art scene friend, i hope you enjoy your stay and ctrl + z

now onto your question! (if you don’t know what layer and layer modes are and how they generally work you should probably google that before you continue reading)

we all perceive colour differently (thx science) and i trust my intuition a lot when it comes to colour picking because of that, and also because i feel like you can make pretty much every colour combination work within the right context. context is key! but still, remember that all of this is about how i perceive colour, so you might not agree with everything i say.

here’s a quick rundown of terms you’ll see around a lot in reference to colours and shading: the hue, which is the ‘colour’ itself, the saturation aka the intensity, and the brightness [or value] which describes how dark or bright we perceive a colour to be.

rule of thumb: when you shade don’t just add black (or white) to your base colours, that will make your drawings boring and lifeless. use different hues and saturation!

now first things first: which skin colour does the character have?

you’ll mostly be navigating in the red to yellow spectrum for the skin tone. so when i pick the base colours i usually start with the skin and adjust the rest of the colours accordingly. if you’re not sure where to begin it might help if you first determine the values (brightness) of the base colours in grayscale.

and here are a few colour variations—i stuck to the approximate values but played around with a lot of different hues and levels of saturation.

now compare 3 and 5: you’ll notice that 3 is very bright and leans towards orange hues, whereas 5 has a pinkish tint.

on the left i gave 5 the hair colour of 3 and in my opinion the pink hue of the skin doesn’t go well with the orange undertone of the hair. you’ll have to experiment a lot to find out which combinations work for you.  

ctrl + u is your biggest friend (or image >> adjustments >> hue/saturation in photoshop, the shortcut works in sai and clip studio paint too). play with the sliders and see what happens. i do that a lot myself, because it’s easier to coordinate the colours like that afterwards instead of trying to manually pick perfectly matching ones right away.

for further adjustments i like to use an extra semi-transparent layer on top of everything with just a single colour to add atmospheric light. this unifies the colours and makes them more harmonious, if that’s what you’re looking for. this is about as far as i’d go if i didn’t want to shade the drawing.

if i do want to shade, especially with high contrasts and dramatic light, i darken the base by just adding an additional black layer, here set to 40% opacity. of course you could add a colour layer like the ones i mentioned previously too.

to create an impression of dramatic light you need a high contrast between light and dark areas (1). if i want additional visual intrest i often add secondary light which falls onto the main shadow areas. here i picked a faint greenish blue to balance out the yellow (2). and since light is at least partially reflected when it hits a surface you should add a faint glow that goes across the shadow/light border. i uses a mid-brown with a very soft brush on a layer set to overlay here (3).

for this shading style i like to use the layer mode colour dodge with lowered opacity + fill settings. for some layer modes opacity and fill do the exact same thing (e.g. for multiply or screen). however for colour dodge there’s a big difference:

a lowered opacity merely alters the transparency of the entire layer. that looks pretty awful sometimes, because the bright orange affects the dark of the hair much more intensely than the already brighter skin. but when you lower the fill percentage you primarily lower the amount of light that falls onto darker colours. so the layer’s opacity setting treats every colour equally whereas the fill setting takes their values into consideration. it might be hard to understand if you don’t try it out yourself, so just play around to get a feel for how it works!

and to summarise, here’s a process gif:

colour is an extremely big topic and i’ve only barely scratched the surface but i hope that still helped you out a little! the fastest way to learn is always to try things yourself, so grab a sketch and experiment. 👍

Naruto: Uchiha Sasuke

I like his latest hair and calmer personality much better, so I decided that they warranted my best shot at semi-realism.

A way to get rid of blue lines in Clip Studio paint in case you use lined paper or sketch in blue.

After you scan your image in and rotate it to how you like. We first want to make the lines and blue pop out a little more if they aren’t already.

Now go to Tone Curve and in the drop down, select Red and drag the left box all the way up, then change the dropdown to green and do the same there.

Now go to Hue/Saturation in the same Tonal Correction menu under Edit and slide the saturation slider all the way to the left

As you can see we’re now left with the lines, but they seem a bit washed out- we can fix that with more editing in the levels.

and done!

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thank you so much, i’ve been adding flowers to my art a lot more this year so i’m glad they’ve been looking nicer! i still sorta wing it sometimes, but here are a few techniques that i find helpful! (also i’m not sure exactly which type of flowers the ask was referring to, but here’s my tut for a generic rose)

  • (1) blob.
  • (2) decide which direction your flower is facing so you can maintain the same perspective, and this will help you figure out how to roughly place in the petals too.
  • 3) for most of my flowers i usually start from the outside in. i use a square watercolour brush to block in the shape of the overall flower with a slightly lighter colour than the base blob. 
  • (4 - 6) i keep blocking in more petals circling towards the centre in a spiral fashion, making the colour even lighter and petals smaller the closer towards the centre i get. once the rough painting is done, i’ll go and adjust the colours/values as i see fit (in this case i used levels to increase the contrast a little, and then hue & saturation to add a slight yellow tint).
  • (7 - 9) this is the detailing/fixing up stage. i’m basically refining the shapes of the petals and adding in a few more to the empty spots (totally optional, depending on how full you want your flower). you can totally leave it as shown in 8, but for more intensity i sometimes duplicate the flower layer then set the top layer to overlay. making your lights lighter and darks darker will generally add a bit more dimension to your rose!
Some tips on painting from B&W to color

As promised! Using this last painting.

1. Tweak your levels

You do not want your darkest darks to be too low on the value scale: you will be colorizing shadows, and likely glazing over them to darken them. To avoid a muddy mess, make sure that the darkest darks on your HSV/HSB (hue-saturation-value) color sliders are at MOST a 9. Photoshop has a Levels feature that lets you do that quickly.


2. Start with a colored base

Sometimes I use a gradient map (which can color lights/mid values/shadows at once), but the idea is the same – you want to color on top of a picture that has NO grey in it. Pick a neutral color that’s closest to your shadows – for example, here I wanted to have a warmer skintone, so I made the shadows cool.

3. Glaze CAREFULLY

Here is an example of what not to do – do not pile adjustments layers on top of one another in hopes that some of them will give you a good result. Lower your opacity and learn what layer modes do! Overlay will hit your lights, Multiply will hit your shadows, and Hard Light (my favourite) will show up exactly like a colored light source would.

Slow down. This is kind of like glazing an oil painting. Pull down your saturation and leave the Jersey Shore orange for the last steps of a painting.

4. Turn on hue jitter

Real skin is transluscent and highly reactive to the environment it is in. If you look at any realist painting, you will see glazes and glazes and glazes of color packed into a single square inch of canvas. You can imitate this by playing with your brush’s HUE JITTER setting, which will make the color you pick jump around the color wheel a little. This is especially helpful when glazing shadows.

5. Use neutrals to unify your painting

Greys are great. Greys are AMAZING when you want skin to pop, and this is why the majority of classical portraiture sports a neutral background. I just went over the whole piece and punched a bit of grey-green into the background and shadows to “kill” the oversaturated color. The painting immediately started to come together.


6. Remember that this is not a coloring book

The great thing about digital painting is that your CANVAS is your palette – and this method allows you to build one. It helps establish major structures so you can focus on color and light, but chances are you will end up repainting large parts of it anyway. Don’t be afraid to!

he smile

Gif tutorial

Since some people asked me a tutorial on how I color my gifs and make color palette gifsets/multicolor gifs, I’ve finally decided to do it.

We’ll go from this:

to this:

and finally to this:

and this:

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Coloring Tutorial for Shadowhunters S2

Hello pals, I’m gonna show you how to achieve a quality coloring for Shadowhunters Season 2 despite the horrid lighting of the show this season. 

  • Please like/reblog if you find this tutorial useful.
  • This will not magically work for every scene, adjustments need to be made. This is just here to help you learn and gain some tips.
  • If you have any questions just let me know.

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anonymous asked:

Wow how do you pick color schemes for your art? They're so amazing

It’s a lot of trial and error and practice but I’ll give some tips!

remember, these are guidelines. I’ve broken all of these on purpose at some point or another. it’s important to just have a good reason and to be aware of it!

  • look up color theory, there’s lots of tutorials and explanations

edit!! I’ll also tack on what @thorsens recommended! 

I would suggest for people to check out Josef Albers “Interaction of Color”. It gives a good understanding of how colors work in relation to each other which is very helpful in general. - Thor

  • I go for two contrasting *enough* colors (they don’t have to be exact opposites, but I try to give at least one color of change difference, so like red and yellow can work, but not red and orange or red and purple.)

pink and blue aren’t nessiciarly complete opposites, but there’s not a lot of purple in the piece. There’s enough contrast between the greenish-blue and the bright pink and magenta.

colors close to each other still work, but observe how it changes the mood of the piece!

the peach and yellow and purple work together, but create a softer, calmer tone. This is partially because the colors aren’t as bright, but also because they’re near in both value and color. It make the piece feel cohesive, which was important in this piece as I was highlighting how they interacted and found meaning to the place they were in!

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Instagram PSD Tutorial: How To Use & Basic Help

So I’ve had a handful of people recently asking for help on how to achieve the results I did. As a novice once myself I understand how confusing things like PSDs and clipping masks can be so I’ve organised this (hopefully helpful) tutorial on how I did this graphic. I hope that after this you don’t have any more questions but if you do feel free to bother me with them, I don’t mind one bit! I’ll try my best. Please reblog/like if you found this helpful.

[tutorial under readmore]

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anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips for composition?? I'm a beginner on that and I really love the way you do it

thank you! (again ive never had any real training in any of this) but i would say! know your basic composition rules/template things- golden ratio, golden spiral, etc, first of all. For me personally, i draw a lot of wide open spaces/backgrounds so MOST of my composition are rule-of-thirds ( i really should try the spiral more often). 

second, think about line balances/unbalance. it’s about the mood you want to set. for example, with the first drawing i wanted a very laid-back tranquil mood, so i wanted a sense of balance with my composition with the upward slope of one hill being canceled out with the downward slope of the second. for the second one, however, i wanted some energy, so i sought to create an upset with the lines.

third, i’d consider color balances/ imbalances. colors have SO much say in where your eye travels around the picture (and also im a color FREAK). you can use darker colors to frame a picture if your piece feels too big and empty and you want the focus to narrow down without actually making the canvas smaller:

if you want the viewer’s eyes to just travel around the picture and take the whole thing in, distribute colors evenly throughout the canvas. (sorry it’s so messy, but you get the point) think about the distribution of hue, saturation, and darkness/lightness.

if you want them to focus on that ONE thing, you can concentrate saturation, brightness, warmness etc to make the area pop. i used all three in these drawings!

also! @genicetea has some NEEAATT stuff on drawing the viewer’s eye and contrasts and composition on her twitter so if you want something that actually makes sense go there!

hope that helps a little! and sorry for the long post but you all should really expect that by now :’)

Light

Pairing: Jughead x Reader

Request: “could you please do 42 and 45 with jughead x reader? thanks !!” and
“Hi!!! I really love your blog! I was wondering if you could do a Jughead one with #45 and 50, please? ❤️”

Prompt: 
#42 “I hate you.” - “No, you don’t.”
#45 “I’m your lock screen?!” - “You weren’t supposed to see that.”
#50 “If I asked, you’d say no.” - “You don’t know that.”

Everything Tag List: @betty-coopers-number-one-stan@1amluke, @pissheadofficial, @teen-river-wolf, @itsjaynebird, @nooneshoney, @carouselof-progress, @apocalypticangell, @welc0met0thedarkside, @sparklingriverdale, @gryffndor, @jugheads-lawyer, @jugheadjns
Jughead x Reader Tag List: @keepcalmandflywithtoothless, @lostinpercyseyes, @captainsuperfangirl, @letsgetfuckingsuperwholocked@xbobaaa, @theselfishllama

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