howland island

Amelia’s Last Flight

Born on 2 July, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, earning her the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross. After visiting a Long Beach airfield and getting a ride in an airplane, Amelia “knew I had to fly,” and fly she certainly did. Shortly after this life changing experience, Amelia saved enough money to take flying lessons from female aviator, Anita Snook. From her first lesson, Amelia immersed herself in everything to do with aviation. She read everything about flying she could get her hands on and spent the majority of her free time at the airfield. 

 In 1921, Amelia finally purchased her own biplane - a second-hand Kinner Airster that she painted yellow and named The Canary. The following year, she flew The Canary to an altitude of 14,000 feet, setting a world record for female pilots. Her next airplane was a yellow Kissel which she named Yellow Peril. Over the forthcoming years, Amelia flew around America as well as Canada. In 1932, Amelia became the first woman to fly solo nonstop across the Atlantic, pushing her into the limelight. Amelia decided she would try to become another first - the first woman to fly around the world. After problems with the propellers during the first attempt, Amelia and her second navigator, Fred Noonan, set off once again in June of 1937, flying to South America, Africa, Asia and Lae, New Guinea. 

Amelia and Fred departed Lae on the 2nd of July. Unfortunately, they never made it to her their next destination, Howland Island. When the duo didn’t arrive at the scheduled destination, a search party was assembled but Amelia and Fred were gone. The main theory is that she ran out of fuel and crashed and sank, however, another theory suggests she was captured by Japanese forces. The book, Amelia Earhart Lived suggests that Amelia survived the flight and moved to New Jersey where she created a new life for herself. 

 Whatever the truth may be, what became of Amelia Earhart is one of the most peculiar mysteries in the world.

Game-changing Amelia Earhart picture

The retired federal agent who discovered what he believes is the first photographic evidence of Amelia Earhart alive and well after crash-landing in the Pacific Ocean during her attempted round-the-world flight says he didn’t understand the significance of the image until years later.

The black-and-white photo is of a group of people standing on a dock on Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands, including one who seems to be a slim woman with her back to the camera. A new documentary airing in the US on Sunday claims the figure is the famed aviator who disappeared 80 years ago this month.

Retired US Treasury Agent Les Kinney said in an interview on Wednesday with The Associated Press that he was looking for clues surrounding Earhart’s disappearance in the National Archives in College Park, Maryland, when he found the photograph in 2012 in a box filled mostly with text documents from the Office of Naval Intelligence but “didn’t really look at it carefully” because he was looking over thousands of documents and images.

In 2015, he took another pass at the photo. “I looked at it and I went, ‘I can’t believe this!”’ He asked his wife to come over and pointed to the seated person, asking if it seemed to her to be a man or a woman. “She said, 'It’s a woman!”’ His search led him to identify the ship seen at the right apparently pulling Earhart’s plane wreckage on a barge.

The image is at the heart of the two-hour Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence, which argues that Earhart, along with her navigator Fred Noonan, crash-landed in the Japanese-held Marshall Islands, where they were picked up by the Japanese military and held prisoner.

In the documentary, that photo is subjected to facial-recognition and other forensic testing, such as torso measurements. Experts on the show claim the subjects are likely Earhart and Noonan.

Others aren’t convinced, including Dorothy Cochrane, a curator at the National Air and Space Museum and an expert on women in aviation. She said the blurry image isn’t conclusive. “I cannot say definitively that this is Amelia Earhart. That doesn’t mean that it might not be, somehow. But you can’t say that just through the image the way it is.”

The disappearance of Earhart and Noonan on July 2, 1937, in the Western Pacific Ocean has been the subject of continuing searches, research and debate.

The longstanding official theory is that the famed pilot ran out of gas and crashed into deep ocean waters northwest of Howland Island, a tiny speck in the South Pacific that she and Noonan missed.

While the photo is undated, Kinney strongly believes it was taken in July 1937, and he is convinced it shows Earhart and Noonan, based on other evidence including physical landmarks and islanders’ recollections.

Kinney said the presence of two Caucasians on Jaluit Atoll prior to WWII was very unusual. The man’s distinctive widow’s peak seems to match Noonan’s. As for the figure with her back to the camera: “You have one that has a striking resemblance to Amelia Earhart from the back, including the short hair.”

Kinney suspects the pair may have been picked up by a fishing boat and handed over to Japanese authorities, who initially may have had no intention of keeping them. That may explain why there are no handcuffs or restraints in the photo.

Amelia Earhart’s Disappearance ,mystery yet to be solved?

Amelia Earhart’s disappearance is still one of the most famous mysteries. In an attempt to fly around the world, the American pilot and her co-pilot vanished near Howland Island,24 hours after leaving Lae, New Guinea in the central Pacific Ocean in 1937.


The Mystery of Aemelia Earhart has captured the imagination of young and old, amateur and professional, since she disappeared on July 2, 1937 on her flight over the Pacific which would complete her around-the-world flight - the longest (following the equatorial route) and the first by a woman.
Despite a $4m search which covered 250,000 square miles of ocean, no trace of the pair was ever found. Most researchers believe that the plane ran out of fuel and ditched into the sea.

Theories about disappearance

There are three main hypotheses – that is, educated guesses that can be tested through research and exploration:

Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared over the Pacific in 1937. What happened to them?

1. They crashed at sea;

2. They were captured by the Japanese military and died; or

3. They landed on Nikumaroro, an uninhabited coral atoll in what is now the Republic of Kiribati, survived for awhile but finally died.

Despite massive search efforts by the U.S. Navy, Earhart and her plane wreckage were never found. The longtime mystery has led to creative conspiracy theories. Among the most popular are that she was a spy and that she landed and was executed by the Japanese. Another one claimed that she survived, moved to New Jersey and assumed a new identity.

For a long time, the most likely explanation was that the plane ran out of fuel and the flyers ditched or crashed and then died at sea. More recently, another theory has gained some traction. It holds that the flyers landed on uninhabited Nikumaroro Island, formerly called Gardner Island.

According to the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), Earhart and Noonan survived on the island for several weeks. They caught fish, seabirds and turtles and collected rainwater. Earhart died at a campsite on the island’s southeast end. Noonan’s fate is unknown.

This theory is based on on-site investigations that have revealed improvised tools, bits of clothing, plexiglass and an aluminum panel. In May 2012, investigators found a jar of freckle cream that some believe could have belonged to Earhart. Additionally, reports of lost distress calls have been reported.

Also, in 1940, a British Colonial Service officer found a partial skeleton on the island, as well as a campfire, animal bones, a sextant box and remnants of a man’s shoe and a woman’s shoe. The officer thought he may have discovered Earhart’s remains, but a doctor believed the skeleton to be male, and American authorities were not notified. The bones were later lost. Recent computerized analysis of the skeleton’s measurements suggests that the skeleton was probably that of a white, northern European female.

TIGHAR has led several expeditions to the island and found artifacts that suggest they were left by an American woman of the 1930s. The organization plans more expeditions in the next few years.

Time zones at the International Date Line

WonderWhy7439:

This is a particularly strange part of the International Date Line, far from a straight line. This is mainly due the country of Kiribati, an island country which spans three time zones (+12, +13 and +14).

There’s a 26 hour time difference between the Line Islands of Kiribati (+14) and the uninhabited US territories of Baker and Howland Island (-12).

You may also notice the International Date Lines passes through the Samoan Islands. Just 70km between the country of Samoa and US unincorporated territory of American Samoa. Samoa switched from -11 to +13 in 2011, while American Samoa stayed at -11.

I made this image for my latest YouTube video about time zones.

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Amelia Earhart

Amelia Mary Earhart (July 24, 1897 – disappeared July 2, 1937) was an American aviation pioneer and author. Earhart was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She received the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross for this record. She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. Earhart joined the faculty of the Purdue University aviation department in 1935 as a visiting faculty member to counsel women on careers and help inspire others with her love for aviation. She was also a member of the National Woman’s Party, and an early supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment. During an attempt to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe in 1937 in a Purdue-funded Lockheed Model 10 Electra, Earhart disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island. Fascination with her life, career and disappearance continues to this day. More