how to succeed in love

Ways to un-stick a stuck story
  • Do an outline, whatever way works best. Get yourself out of the word soup and know where the story is headed.
  • Conflicts and obstacles. Hurt the protagonist, put things in their way, this keeps the story interesting. An easy journey makes the story boring and boring is hard to write.
  • Change the POV. Sometimes all it takes to untangle a knotted story is to look at it through different eyes, be it through the sidekick, the antagonist, a minor character, whatever.
  • Know the characters. You can’t write a story if the characters are strangers to you. Know their likes, dislikes, fears, and most importantly, their motivation. This makes the path clearer.
  • Fill in holes. Writing doesn’t have to be linear; you can always go back and fill in plotholes, and add content and context.
  • Have flashbacks, hallucinations, dream sequences or foreshadowing events. These stir the story up, deviations from the expected course add a feeling of urgency and uncertainty to the narrative.
  • Introduce a new mystery. If there’s something that just doesn’t add up, a big question mark, the story becomes more compelling. Beware: this can also cause you to sink further into the mire.
  • Take something from your protagonist. A weapon, asset, ally or loved one. Force him to operate without it, it can reinvigorate a stale story.
  • Twists and betrayal. Maybe someone isn’t who they say they are or the protagonist is betrayed by someone he thought he could trust. This can shake the story up and get it rolling again.
  • Secrets. If someone has a deep, dark secret that they’re forced to lie about, it’s a good way to stir up some fresh conflict. New lies to cover up the old ones, the secret being revealed, and all the resulting chaos.
  • Kill someone. Make a character death that is productive to the plot, but not “just because”. If done well, it affects all the characters, stirs up the story and gets it moving.
  • Ill-advised character actions. Tension is created when a character we love does something we hate. Identify the thing the readers don’t want to happen, then engineer it so it happens worse than they imagined.
  • Create cliff-hangers. Keep the readers’ attention by putting the characters into new problems and make them wait for you to write your way out of it. This challenge can really bring out your creativity.
  • Raise the stakes. Make the consequences of failure worse, make the journey harder. Suddenly the protagonist’s goal is more than he expected, or he has to make an important choice.
  • Make the hero active. You can’t always wait for external influences on the characters, sometimes you have to make the hero take actions himself. Not necessarily to be successful, but active and complicit in the narrative.
  • Different threat levels. Make the conflicts on a physical level (“I’m about to be killed by a demon”), an emotional level (“But that demon was my true love”) and a philosophical level (“If I’m forced to kill my true love before they kill me, how can love ever succeed in the face of evil?”).
  • Figure out an ending. If you know where the story is going to end, it helps get the ball rolling towards that end, even if it’s not the same ending that you actually end up writing.
  • What if? What if the hero kills the antagonist now, gets captured, or goes insane? When you write down different questions like these, the answer to how to continue the story will present itself.
  • Start fresh or skip ahead. Delete the last five thousand words and try again. It’s terrifying at first, but frees you up for a fresh start to find a proper path. Or you can skip the part that’s putting you on edge – forget about that fidgety crap, you can do it later – and write the next scene. Whatever was in-between will come with time.
There’s no such thing as what you ‘should’ be doing with your life. If you’re not holding yourself back from something you really want to try, and you enjoy the way you spend your day, then you’re a smashing success.
—  Lori Deschene
Find the courage to keep on pursuing what you believe in, no matter how many people fail to want you to succeed. You are worthy of happiness, love and peace, do whatever it takes for that to be achieved. There will be days where your patience runs thin but do not give up on what keeps you alive. Keep chasing the things that call for you and never give up on your dreams.
— 

When dreams seem tough by Amy Kennedy

23/03/17

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Wear sunscreen.

If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it. The long-term benefits of sunscreen have been proved by scientists, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience. I will dispense this advice now.

Enjoy the power and beauty of your youth. Oh, never mind. You will not understand the power and beauty of your youth until they’ve faded. But trust me, in 20 years, you’ll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can’t grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked. You are not as fat as you imagine.

Don’t worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum. The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 4 p.m. on some idle Tuesday.

Do one thing every day that scares you.

Sing.

Don’t be reckless with other people’s hearts. Don’t put up with people who are reckless with yours.

Floss.

Don’t waste your time on jealousy. Sometimes you’re ahead, sometimes you’re behind. The race is long and, in the end, it’s only with yourself.

Remember compliments you receive. Forget the insults. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how.

Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements.

Stretch.

Don’t feel guilty if you don’t know what you want to do with your life. The most interesting people I know didn’t know at 22 what they wanted to do with their lives. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds I know still don’t.

Get plenty of calcium. Be kind to your knees. You’ll miss them when they’re gone.

Maybe you’ll marry, maybe you won’t. Maybe you’ll have children, maybe you won’t. Maybe you’ll divorce at 40, maybe you’ll dance the funky chicken on your 75th wedding anniversary. Whatever you do, don’t congratulate yourself too much, or berate yourself either. Your choices are half chance. So are everybody else’s.

Enjoy your body. Use it every way you can. Don’t be afraid of it or of what other people think of it. It’s the greatest instrument you’ll ever own.

Dance, even if you have nowhere to do it but your living room.

Read the directions, even if you don’t follow them.

Do not read beauty magazines. They will only make you feel ugly.

Get to know your parents. You never know when they’ll be gone for good. Be nice to your siblings. They’re your best link to your past and the people most likely to stick with you in the future.

Understand that friends come and go, but with a precious few you should hold on. Work hard to bridge the gaps in geography and lifestyle, because the older you get, the more you need the people who knew you when you were young.

Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard. Live in Northern California once, but leave before it makes you soft. Travel.

Accept certain inalienable truths: Prices will rise. Politicians will philander. You, too, will get old. And when you do, you’ll fantasize that when you were young, prices were reasonable, politicians were noble and children respected their elders.

Respect your elders.

Don’t expect anyone else to support you. Maybe you have a trust fund. Maybe you’ll have a wealthy spouse. But you never know when either one might run out.

Don’t mess too much with your hair or by the time you’re 40 it will look 85.

Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it. Advice is a form of nostalgia. Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it’s worth.

But trust me on the sunscreen.

—Mary Schmich, “Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young”

Wear sunscreen.

If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it.

The long-term benefits of sunscreen have been proved by scientists, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience. I will dispense this advice now.

Enjoy the power and beauty of your youth.

Oh, never mind. You will not understand the power and beauty of your youth until they’ve faded.

But trust me, in 20 years, you’ll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can’t grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked.

You are not as fat as you imagine.

Don’t worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum.

The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, The kind that blindside you at 4 p.m. on some idle Tuesday.

Do one thing every day that scares you.

Sing.

Don’t be reckless with other people’s hearts. Don’t put up with people who are reckless with yours.

Floss.

Don’t waste your time on jealousy. Sometimes you’re ahead, sometimes you’re behind. The race is long and, in the end, it’s only with yourself.

Remember compliments you receive. Forget the insults. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how.

Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements.

Stretch.

Don’t feel guilty if you don’t know what you want to do with your life. The most interesting people I know didn’t know at 22 what they wanted to do with their lives. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds I know still don’t.

Get plenty of calcium. Be kind to your knees. You’ll miss them when they’re gone.

Maybe you’ll marry, maybe you won’t. Maybe you’ll have children, maybe you won’t. Maybe you’ll divorce at 40, maybe you’ll dance the funky chicken on your 75th wedding anniversary. Whatever you do, don’t congratulate yourself too much, or berate yourself either. Your choices are half chance. So are everybody else’s.

Enjoy your body. Use it every way you can. Don’t be afraid of it or of what other people think of it. It’s the greatest instrument you’ll ever own.

Dance, even if you have nowhere to do it but your living room.

Read the directions, even if you don’t follow them.

Do not read beauty magazines. They will only make you feel ugly.

Get to know your parents. You never know when they’ll be gone for good. Be nice to your siblings. They’re your best link to your past and the people most likely to stick with you in the future.

Understand that friends come and go, but with a precious few you should hold on. Work hard to bridge the gaps in geography and lifestyle, because the older you get, the more you need the people who knew you when you were young.

Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard. Live in Northern California once, but leave before it makes you soft. Travel.

Accept certain inalienable truths: Prices will rise. Politicians will philander. You, too, will get old.

And when you do, you’ll fantasize that when you were young, prices were reasonable, politicians were noble and children respected their elders.

Respect your elders.

Don’t expect anyone else to support you. Maybe you have a trust fund. Maybe you’ll have a wealthy spouse. But you never know when either one might run out.

Don’t mess too much with your hair or by the time you’re 40 it will look 85.

Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it.  Advice is a form of nostalgia. Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it’s worth.

But trust me: I’m the sunscreen.

—  Mary Schmich, “Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young”

i lost a love [x]
a playlist of lost and unrequited loves that doesn’t include on my own

lonely town (on the town) // he’s a right guy (high society) // it hurts me (all shook up) // just not now (i love you because) // there’s a fine, fine line (avenue q) // heaven help my heart (chess) // like it was (merrily we roll along) // legally blonde (legally blonde) // pretty funny (dogfight) // happy to keep his dinner warm (how to succeed in business without really trying) // fly, fly away (catch me if you can) // maybe this time (cabaret) // when words fail (shrek: the musical) // how i am (little women)

ceres in the signs

Ceres Aries
You require physical action to stay happy and like to be nurtured through independence. You are good at cultivating self-dependence in others.

Ceres Taurus
You feel nurtured when you are treated nicely by others. You might be quite a touchy-feely person. You feel good about yourself when you can provide for yourself.

Ceres Gemini
You feel nurtured when people take the time to write/talk to you. You like to learn and be listened to. You feel good about yourself when you’re intellectually ahead of others or competent of whatever task you’re doing.

Ceres Cancer
You like to be ‘mothered’ and also to ‘mother’ others. Self acceptance is key for you to be happy.

Ceres Leo
Helping others may make you feel better about yourself. You foster creativity and independence in others.

Ceres Virgo
You nurture others by showing them what they could do to be better, which may come off as critical sometimes. You are well organized, and can help create this trait in others. You feel nurtured by good lifestyles, good health, and nice material things

Ceres Libra
You are nurtured by beauty and good relationships. You take time to do small things for others to show you care.

Ceres Scorpio
You like to be touched, it makes you feel nurtured by others. You need stability to feel safe in relationship. You like to have good emotional self control.

Ceres Sagittarius
You want to help those around you to succeed, and you share your own knowledge as a way of nurturing as you tend to hide your nurturing qualities. 

Ceres Capricorn
You feel good about yourself when you’re in control of situations. You like to help other people succeed. You equate feeling loved to how well you preform in life.

Ceres Aquarius
You feel nurtured when you are around those you love, and when you are accepted into a group. You nurture others by helping their sense of justice and humanitarianism grow. 

Ceres Pisces
You’re very compassionate and you love to nurture those around you. You need to sometimes take time off to spend alone.

*Ceres in Retrograde - these feelings are internalised and will likely not be expressed. 

10 Reasons Why Dark Heaven is a BL Masterpiece

1) There’s no fixation on gender.

Connor’s concerns over the realisation that he has feelings for Simon are focused upon the fact he’s his best friend rather than the ye olde Yaoi trope of ‘we’re both guys’ = instant classic.

2) The World Building

So this might not be for everyone but I really love the inclusion of the WAF. I just think it’s really clever to seriously consider issues surrounding racism and homophobia in a bl that focuses on an interracial couple in a culturally diverse area rather than pretend everything is sunshine and roses and nothing bad happens ever.

3) There’s plot.

The jumps in time remind me of Maiden Rose and are cleverly used to show the depth behind Simon and Connor’s relationship and the way it’s shaped their lives. The plot isn’t based around a boy meets boy with sex as the climax (ignore the pun) so it’s winning so many brownie points from me.

4) Clever censorship.

I have yet to see a lightsaber dick of which I am very grateful.

5) Female Characters are actually used well.

During the school flashbacks Mona isn’t used to create some sort of love triangle, Connor’s mum is actually an angel, Simon’s stepmother provides depth. Also mass appreciation for Veronica’s character.

6) The Art.

It’s so pretty and you can actually see the cultural diversity present in the world which makes it unique, I think.

7) The undercurrent of desire and longing that run throughout each chapter.

Kiev’s long running attraction towards Simon, Simon’s addiction and need to feel anything now Connor’s gone, Connor’s love for Simon, Veronica’s infatuation with Connor. There’s so much tension that builds up between characters but it’s never played for unnecessary drama it’ll just hurt your heart.

8) Realism.

Changing yourself to fit societal standards, addiction, how much of yourself you are willing to give away to succeed, lost love, bitterness, dysfunctional family dynamics and so much more.

9) The First Chapter

Just read it. It’s amazing how much emotion you can get in 20+ pages without a word.

10) Simon’s smile

It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all, in which case you have failed by default.
— 

J. K. Rowling

He’s good practice

Maiko, Zutara, and Conflict

Conflict is a necessary part of life. It exists as a reality of any relationship, and is not necessarily bad when handled correctly. In fact, a relationship with no apparent conflict may be unhealthier than one with frequent conflict.

Conflicts are critical events that can weaken or strengthen a relationship. 

They can be productive, creating deeper understanding, closeness and respect…

…or they can be destructive, causing resentment, hostility and divorce.

How the conflicts get resolved, not how many occur, is the critical factor in determining whether a relationship will be healthy or unhealthy, mutually satisfying or unsatisfying, friendly or unfriendly, deep or shallow, intimate or cold.

When considering two relationships surrounding Zuko in A:TLA, it’s important to consider how conflict is approached and the resulting resolution in Zuko’s relationships and the stark difference between Zuko and Katara’s conflict and Zuko and Mai’s conflict.

For the purpose of keeping this succinct, I’m going to discuss the conflict in The Beach and The Old Masters, delving into how Katara and Mai approach a distraught Zuko and address what’s troubling him. If you have an interest in learning about prior conflicts, or my thoughts on Maiko in general, please consult the following links:

Moving forward, The Beach presents us with an jealous, antagonistic version of Zuko, whose insecurities are largely fueled by his internal battle, and an equally irate and antagonistic Mai. It seems that time spent together on Ember Island, meant to be a relaxing get away, would be the perfect time for the pair to discuss the many pitfalls of their relationship. Instead, any interaction between them turns into a confrontation carrying an accusatory tone.

Keep reading

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For ingoosenok : Lord Melbourne offers Sir Robert some advice.

anonymous asked:

Dee have I told you lately that I love you? Have I told you there's no one else above you. You fill my heart with gladness, you take away my sadness. Ease my troubles that's what you do. Love you!!

Take care of yourself Dee! We all love you and want you to succeed!

Hi love. How are you feeling today?

You guys are the sweetest nicest people out there! :* I’m doing fine, a bit stressed, but it’s all under control. I’m still excited about the BBMAs and everything, I had to log on and reblog everything haha. I hope you all are doing fine!! :*