how to draw manga

When Tai and Adam meet. Probably.
Read from right to left

Today’s work - this is based in IlariaSTFD ‘s work - theirs is absolutely stunning and beautiful - that why I wanted to do it too - I think if you want to improve yourself you have to look up to artists who are great so you can learn from them!!

anonymous asked:

Hi! do you have any tips or tutorials for begginers? i really want to start drawing but i have no idea where to begin. do i look for a book to teach me or something? honestly i have no idea

Honestly the best I could say is just draw. Like …just put the pencil to the paper and draw that thing my dude! Like there’s no one way to start, it’s different for everybody.

I personally learned a lot from how to draw books growing up and if you have some available (or the funds to buy some) I would highly recommend it! As for specific book recommendations well after glancing at my bookshelf I think the “How to draw manga: Sketching manga style” series is pretty good for new artists. 

Like the first one teaches a lot about anatomy and just a bunch of beginner stuff!

Like they have a bunch of stuff explaining different parts of the body and even have sketches where they show just the muscles to get an idea of how the body looks in different positions and cool stuff like that!

I also have volume 2 and 5. 2 is all about proportions which can be a tricky thing to keep in mind for a lot of artists ovo;;;

It even has a section on perspective which high school (and current) me was (is) super greatful for <3

5 is sketching props which sounds kinda silly but honestly it’s something that I was desperately needing (and still need) in a lot of my work. Like it’s so easy to make a blank lifeless world but this book helps with reminders of “hey there’s shit going on in this world and it looks way more interesting if you add props ya dingus!”

Only problem is these books are now rare so they can be pricey as hell (saw them go up to 200 bucks!) so I would honestly recommend finding these online as a pdf if you can. Though these aren’t the only good books out there I’m sure, just the only ones I can think of that would be super helpful off the top of my head!

I had a such a great time earlier at my Pop Manga Coloring book panel! 😊💕 It was a blast coloring with you peeps! 😆🖍❤ But if you enjoyed my coloring book, please stop by my booth X3-4 and check out the other great books I have with me at Calgary Expo! 📚✨ I have my “Tanpopo” graphic novel volume 1 & 2, How to Draw “Pop Manga”, How to Paint “Pop Painting”, and my art book “Rainbow Children”! ❤📖 There’s a little bit of everything, so feel free to come by and flip through them! ☺ And I’m doing a convention special! If you buy two or more, I’ll do a FREE sketch in one of them! 😁 Have a great rest of your evening! 🤓 Hugs! 💖💖💖

anonymous asked:

How do you draw hair? Whenever I try it just *exaggerated hand motion meaning giant mess*

To be honest, that’s pretty much how I draw hair, too. And honestly? Hair is such a complex, diverse thing. There’s a millions of ways to draw hair based on style and texture. I’ve gotten many asks considering hair, and really, I’ve always been a bit confused on how to answer since hair comes in so many different forms. But! Giving it thought, I realized I can give you a really quick, “basic” guide, until I get a more specific question regarding hair.

So, the first step is to draw the hairlines. Hairlines is basically the “hat” of your head, and is what shapes the forehead. Drawing this before you add hair as a guide will be extremely helpful with the hairstyle, and it adds to the the facial features as well. There’s many different types hairlines, as shown here, and they may all vary in height or shape. Go wild, be experimental! Remember that this is a guide, however, so once you have the hair drawn out, make sure that the hairline isn’t as visible as it is here, but drawn as fine lines instead.

The next thing you can do is to draw a point somewhere on the head which will define the volume and the direction of the hair. This is extremely helpful, since you can draw all the hair strands starting from this point. They may start wherever you find fitting, and you may add more than one (although that adds to the complexity!)

The next step is to think in shapes overlapping each other.  For wavy hair, I like to draw the shapes as teardrops. For puffy hair I like to draw it in circles and ovals. And for straight hair, I like to think in rectangles. It’s all very simple: use the guides mentioned earlier to place the shapes on the head, making them overlap each other until you’re satisfied. Be as messy or simple as you want, and draw them however you’d like as long as it works for you. Don’t try to details yet, though, focus on shapes!

Once you’re satisfied with your result, you may draw the details to your liking. This, I think requires a tutorial on it’s own since hair textures can vary greatly. I’ll show you a quick example below, but again, this isn’t something that works with all hair types. And naturally, once you’re done, remove the head-shape outline. I kept it here just so that you could see how the hair is placed on top of it.

And as you can see, this method works with short hairstyles as well!

In fact, it works for any hairstyle, and you may even mix the basic shapes to get a unique look. (Ignore the lack of pen pressure on this one)

Now, I realize that the ‘finished’ result can be a bit difficult for some to imagine drawing. Again, I still think this requires a tutorial on it’s own, but I will show you how I do it with one of the hairstyles. 

(As you can see, I haven’t drawn out the hairline or a “point”, but this isn’t because I don’t need to, but because I already have it mentally drawn out, it’s not required for this drawing. For some hairstyles, however, I do still draw the hairline/point, especially if the hair is pulled back. But for the sake of simplicity, I will keep it, well, simple.)

Notice how I draw the shapes just as mentioned before? Here, I draw very fine lines in vague teardrop shapes, which I overlay as I draw.

Adding more for volume…

Finishing the look, keep adding more layers…

Defining the “point” as a detail, so that it doesn’t look like some horribly made wig…

Keep reading

youtube

First video in a series describing my work on the new “Yuragi” comic that I will be publishing online (once I finish it).

新しい制作中の漫画「Yuragi」のメイキング動画01をアップしました。メモや絵コンテの撮り方、線画の描き方を見れます。

gravitality  asked:

I have two questions! First: have you ever thought of doing a tarot card suit for your characters? I think it'd work really well for them! And two: help me how do I draw legs

@gravitality

Hi!! I’ve absolutely been thinking about that, yeah, in fact I recently talked about that to my boyfriend just recently. It’ll likely happen after october! And to answer your second question! I made a thing on legs that i hope you’ll find useful!!

So. I’ve already explained basics on legs here, but I don’t think it hurts to go through some extra details to help you understand legs some more.

The very basic thing is to imagine legs as teardrops. Again, this has already been covered in said tutorial above, but I figured it’s still good to mention even the most basic thing that I know of. I still highly recommend you check it out to get in more detail and to see some other examples and practices that you do. But basically, think of legs in the shapes of teardrops, when it comes to shape. If you need a simple stick-figure to connect the legs in the first place, make sure that they bend at the knees a bit so that the legs don’t come off as stiff and unnatural. 

As you can see, this method works perfectly for realistic legs as it does for stylistic ones. Remember to use these as a guideline, never to be the exact base of the legs you will be drawing. If you draw traditionally, remember not to draw these guides too hard, or they will be hard to erase/do freestyle!

But how do you actually draw out the legs without drawing them perfectly straight, as shown to the left? The trick is to add volume to them, and how you do that can be winged to your own liking. The idea is to think in curves. As no leg is perfectly straight. You may make these curves minimal if you don’t want them to be curvy, but keep in mind, still, that not even your own bones are perfectly straight, so it is highly recommended that you make them bend, at least a little. 

It all depends on how you draw them as well. Say you put your legs together, as shown in this picture, what happens to the fat and muscle? Naturally, they press together, much like how thighs squish on the surface when you sit down (I’m sure most people know what I’m talking about). Make sure this shows in your art! This is very important to keep in mind, because it makes it all look more natural and believable. Try to cross your legs or stand up and sit down again for real-life examples!

The same applies for stretching your legs, more or less, except they appear to become more ‘hollow’ and slimmer. They become less soft to the touch, too, and might show. Try stretching your legs and feel where the muscles tense and where it feels ‘hollow’. This is very helpful with your art.

Many leg tutorials talk about legs without mentioning the behind. It requires a tutorial on it’s own, in all honesty, but this is the most simplest way to draw it connecting to the legs. Remember that it comes in many different shapes, and this is just a super basic guide! Two circles overlapping, while following the line and flow of the legs. Remember the muscle/fat as mentioned above!

Okay, so we got the basics of leg shapes figured out? What if you want o draw them in a certain pose, or with a certain silhouette, but perhaps do not have the reference for it? Or you want to blend your style into it? The key is to not shy away from doodling the form. Make mess, draw lightly and don’t care about the anatomy. That way you’ll get everything down without it appearing stiff. You can clean up the sketch later, always, and if you can, use a reference after you have drawn your pose, to correct your drawing.

Remember that the hips do a lot to the pose of the legs! Make sure they are in flow with your legs, so that it can look more natural. Remembers that hips ‘rotate’ with the spine.

I’ve talked about this method before when it comes to posing, and the same applies for the legs. One way to make legs appear ‘steady’ is to picture them standing in a line, and one of those legs need not to stray from the lines too much, making it steady. If you want a dynamic pose despite the steady pose, you can always have the other leg stray from the line, since it only matters that one leg is steady. This method can create good, casual poses without making them appear boring. (also notice how the teardrop shapes are used here, despite the highly stylized legs)

Do you want a highly dynamic pose, or them to appear unsteady, then skip the line entirely and make both legs aim away from it completely. As you can see, the legs appear more moving, in action, as if they’re fighting, falling, or dancing. As you can imagine, this is not a pose that one could stay steady on, suggesting that it’s taken mid-movement. More about posing and this ‘line’ method is talked about in this tutorial.

Hope this helped you, if you have any questions let me know, and if you’d like to check out all my tutorials they can be found here!

I finally made some cacti stuff and it was fun : D