how to and tips

Writing Tip: Don’t Be Afraid of Mixing Dialogue and Action

So I’ve been reading a lot of amateur writing lately, and I’ve noticed what seems to be a common problem: dialogue. 

Tell me if this looks familiar. You start writing a conversation, only to look down and realize it reads like: 

“I’m talking now,” he said. 

“Yes, I noticed,” she said. 

“I have nothing much to add to this conversation,” the third person said. 

And it grates on your ears. So much ‘said.’ It looks awful! It sounds repetitive. So, naturally, you try to shake it up a bit: 

“Is this any better?” He inquired. 

“I’m not sure,” she mused. 

“I definitely think so!” that other guy roared. 

This is not an improvement. This is worse. 

Now your dialogue is just as disjointed as it was before, but you have the added problem of a bunch of distracting dialogue verbs that can have an unintentionally comedic effect. 

So here’s how you avoid it: You mix up the dialogue with description. 

“Isn’t this better?” he asked, leaning forward in his seat. “Don’t you feel like we’re more grounded in reality?” 

She nodded, looking down at her freshly manicured nails. “I don’t feel like a talking head anymore.” 

“Right!” that annoying third guy added. “And now you can get some characterization crammed into the dialogue!” 

The rules of dialogue punctuation are as follows: 

  • Each speaker gets his/her own paragraph - when the speaker changes, you start a new paragraph. 
  • Within the speaker’s own paragraph, you can include action, interior thoughts, description, etc. 
  • You can interrupt dialogue in the middle to put in a “said” tag, and then write more dialogue from that same speaker. 
  • You can put the “said” tag at the beginning or end of the sentence. 
  • Once you’ve established which characters are talking, you don’t need a “said” tag every time they speak. 
  • ETA: use a comma instead of a period at the end of a sentence of dialogue, and keep the ‘said’ tag in lower caps. If you end on a ? or !, the ‘said’ tag is still in lower case. (thanks, commenters who pointed this out!) 

Some more examples: 

“If you’re writing an incomplete thought,” he said, “you put a comma, then the quote mark, then the dialogue tag.” 

“If the sentence ends, you put in a period.” She pointed at the previous sentence. “See? Complete sentences.” 

“You can also replace the dialogue tag with action.” Extra guy yawned. “When you do, you use a period instead of a comma.”

So what do you do with this newfound power? I’m glad you asked. 

  • You can provide description of the character and their surroundings in order to orient them in time and space while talking. 
  • You can reveal characterization through body language and other nonverbal cues that will add more dimension to your dialogue. 
  • You can add interior thoughts for your POV character between lines of dialogue - especially helpful when they’re not saying quite what they mean. 
  • You can control pacing. Lines of dialogue interrupted by descriptions convey a slower-paced conversation. Lines delivered with just a “said” tag, or with no dialogue tag at all, convey a more rapid-fire conversation. 

For example: 

“We’ve been talking about dialogue for a while,” he said, shifting in his seat as though uncomfortable with sitting still. 

“We sure have,” she agreed. She rose from her chair, stretching. “Shall we go, then?” 

“I think we should.” 

“Great. Let’s get out of here.” 

By controlling the pacing, you can establish mood and help guide your reader along to understanding what it is that you’re doing. 

I hope this helps you write better dialogue! If you have questions, don’t hesitate to drop me an ask :)

more unconventional study tips

- if you drank coffee while revising, drink coffee before the exam. if you didn’t, don’t

- listen to one type of music (genre/artist) while revising a certain topic, listen to that music on your way to the exam

- wear the same colour nail polish/perfume when revising and when you’re in the exam

- keep your sleep schedule the same. try to get 8 hours while revising and also the night before the exam. don’t stay up cramming and exhaust yourself

- it’s better to do one hour every day in the week leading up to the exam than 7 hours in one day the day before

these tips can help trigger your memory, they sound weird but they really do work

There’s so much info about tucking and gaffs (less so) but to all new trans girls.. just get some cotton panties like boyshorts style and push it back gently.

 Like you might have to do slightly (slightly) more for tighter clothes or different fabrics but like… ya don’t need to tape yourself every day… or ever… and gaffs are good but unless you’re wearing something tight n thin cotton boyshorts or some other strong underwear will do the trick.

 Like all this info pretending like you need special gaffs, tape, to shove ur testes up into your inguinal canal, etc. is classist, physically harmful, and preventatively daunting information to be spreading without disclaimers like this.

How to study:

Originally posted by slothilda

Before classes:

1 - Have a good night of sleep. 
- At least eight hours.

2 - Take some coffee before going to school. 
- Always have a snack in your bag. (Don’t study hungry)

3 - Workout.
- I know it’s going to be hard, since most of you have to wake up so early, but working out will help you to make the most out of your day. 

4 - Organize your bag the night before. 

5 - Go through what you’ll be learning on the day.
- This way you will be prepared and you can take notes about your doubts on the subjects.

6 - Listen to a badass playlist on the way to school/college.
- It will boast your motivation. 

7 - Drink a lot of water. 
- That’s a tip to the whole day, actually. Always remember to take a bottle of water or tea to school/college. 


During class:

1 - Sit in the front.
- You will understand more your teacher and be away from the noises that can take away your attention.

2 - Ask questions. (No matter how dumb you think they are.)
- Do not end a class with doubts. If you can’t ask during the class, take a note of your question on a sticker/notebook to ask later.

3 - Record the lectures.

4 - Put stickers on notes you will need to go over. 

5 - Listen to your teacher.
- Be friendly with them.
- Write down their names and contacts (number, emails, social media).

6 - Taking notes on class!

- Don’t worry about it being pretty, just make it organized and understandable so you can go over and make real notes later. 
- Always start with the subject title and date. 
- Differentiate by color your teacher’s notes and yours. Put in red (or any other color you want, actually) the important things.


After class:

1 - Eat.
- You need to replace energy!

2 - Review everything you learned on the day you learned it.

3 - Complete your homework on the day you get it. 
- Or start it, if the task is too big. 
- NEVER FALL BEHIND!

4 - Dress comfy.

5 - Have office hours in case you didn’t understand something.

6 - Watch documentaries on the topic you are currently studying.

7 - Study 30 minutes (50 minutes at the very most) and stop for 10 minutes. 
- Leave your study place when it’s break time.

8 - Turn off your phone or let it out of sight. 

9 - Test yourself/talk out loud.
- Do practice questions!

10 - Taking notes after class!

- Organize your notes by color.
- Rewrite the informations with your own words.
- When writing the new notes, make it pretty if you can. (I think it motivates me to study, looking at something well made) Otherwhise, be simple and objective, focus on the most important things.
- Go over the class recording and read the books to compare with your class notes, to make sure you didn’t forget anything.

How To Motivate Yourself To Write

This was meant to provide motivation, but honestly, this is more of a list of ways to make sure you get it done, rather than make yourself “motivated”. Either way, this should benefit you somehow.


  • In the words of Chuck Wendig, “do not fucking multitask”. Carve out a specific time to write and use it to write. Don’t try to simultaneously write and tweet and check your email. Whether it be 15 minutes or 2 hours, write, and only write.
  • Take breaks occasionally. You can’t just sit there and fog up your creative lens. Go outside and go for a walk. Go to coffee with your friends for an hour. Do something to relax your brain for a while. It’s the same with studying. Don’t drive yourself up the wall because you feel you’re “on a roll”. Your ideas and plans will still be there when you get back. If you begin to get frustrated or your foot starts to fall asleep, take a break.
  • Use a rewards system. Say, for every 100 words, you get a piece of chocolate. After eating a regular sized Hershey’s bar, you’ve got 1200 words. Go you! (I personally fine this incredibly useful.)
  • Have people you trust hold you accountable. Have your best friend (or partner, if you’ve got one) check in when they know you should be writing to make sure you did.
  • Read books like a writer. Read a shitty book and pick it apart to find what you don’t like about it. Read a good book to find what you do like. Use these reflections and apply them to your own work. Nothing helps quite like learning from other people’s mistakes and success.
  • Don’t get stuck in the planning stages. You may get really excited while planning a story, that huge plot twist, a minor character’s backstory, etc, but keep in mind that at some point you’re going to have to sit down and hash it out. A lot of promising writers never get past the planning stages, so in the words of my very wise boyfriend: “Just write”.
  • Write in places that make your creative juices flow. Get cozy in bed with your laptop open to a word document, light a few candles, make some tea, get that incense going, and write. Music really helps to get in the mood as well, and if you would like to take a look at my writing playlist, here it is, free for public consumption.
  • Keep your mind open to new ideas and changes to your story. Your idea will develop and evolve over time, and the beauty of writing is that you can change anything you want and there are no consequences. If you decide to completely scrap a character, remove a subplot, add one in, or change the plot but keep the same characters, you’re totally free to do so. Nothing about writing is set in stone, so stay open minded to new concepts and changes and, most importantly, criticism. (I won’t elaborate on this because I might end up making a whole other post about this topic in the future.)

As always, this is just a compilation of the tips and tricks I’ve found the most useful in my own experience. They may not help, they may help a lot, it really could go either way or somewhere in between, but all the same, I hope this proves useful to you.

Request a prompt list/writing advice/playlist/study help post here

how to study as a busy student

i personally go through this a lot because i have to balance saturday band, honor band, auditions, performances, history club, national history day with school and nonexistant friends. so here u go, friend!! this is my advice to keep up with your (busy) studying!! ha see what i did there im so funny

1. have a planning system. this is a no-brainer. but honestly you’re going to need something to help you keep track of all your deadlines AND your afterschool activities. it doesn’t have to be expensive or fancy; heck it can even be on your phone. but make sure you’re keeping track of everything.

2. use all the time you can to do your homework. if you’re really behind or you have a lot of homework and not enough time to do it at home, do your homework when you can during school. this does NOT mean trying to set the world record for fastest writer while your teacher is collecting the homework. this means on the bus, waiting for your food/the bus/your friends, those down periods during and between classes, during sports practice, and even during lunch. however do NOT make a habit of this!! i get that its a lot, but please still try to have a life!!!

3. set aside a day a week to solely catch up on school work, and another day just to relax. i usually have saturday as my school work day and sunday as my day to relax and prepare for the week. this may seem contradictory, seeing as you may have sports practice or rehearsal on saturday or something. but think of it this way: you’re already going to be working your butt off that day. you might as well keep that flow going and get all your school work together and catch up on any missing assignments. you can also use that sunday off as your motivation to work hard because youre being rewarded with a completely free day.

4. do your homework on friday. please. just do it. this kind of follows the same concept as above: you have school that day anyways, so keep working your hardest. now, if you have no friends like me, this’ll be easy. but if you have plans on fridays (which you should, seriously, go out), stop working 1-2 hours before you have to go somewhere. you can continue any work you havent completed on your catch-up day.

5. drop one or two things. this sounds really painful!!! but being in a lot of extracurriculars and having a nice application/resume is not as nice as your mental health. not being able to balance too many things at once will stress you out and make you sick. like, i used to be in drama club and i also had piano class on wednesdays. once i got older, i realized that these things looked nice on my honor society application, but i didnt have time for what really mattered. (plus i didn’t rly like them anyways.) if you can work your way around it, fine. but otherwise, keep the things close to your heart and drop what you absolutely don’t have time for.

6. if worst comes to worst, talk to your teachers. they will understand, if you’re struggling to be a well-rounded student and keep up your grades at the same time. this doesn’t mean lie or use your teachers as an easy way out. but rather, if everything becomes too overwhelming, talk to someone.

i really hope that helped @ the original anon who asked me this question! sorry this was so late! i’m quite the busy student myself hahaha

youtube

I never thought I’d get to see club penguin’s iceberg tip but here we are, probably 10 years since I stopped believing it was possible, and dreams have come true. (Excuse the sniff in the middle - I was holding back tears)

How To Study For Final Exams?

The secret for a successful final exam preparation is a plan! After three years of college, I developed a strategy for an effective final exam study session. Here it is:

1. How much time do you have left?

The very first step is to determine how much time is left and how much material you need to cover during this period. 

  • Count how many days you have left before the final (e.g. 6 days)
  • Count how many chapters and sections in this chapters you need to study (e.g. 4 chapters with 5 sections in each => 4 ch x 5 sec = you have 20 sections in total)
  • You need to spread 20 sections through 5 days and leave 1 last day for a total review. Here you have 4 sections per day. 
  • If your chapters are not broken down into sections you can either break them down into sections yourself or just use the number of chapters. You can also use the number of points in your study guide if you have one.

I like this strategy because it customizes a study plan for any class and time you have left.When I know what I need to finish every day in order to kill this final, it makes me less stressed and more motivated.  

2. Determine what you know and what you don’t know

  • Let’s use your time efficiently. Don’t waste your time on what you already know, focus on information that you don’t understand or don’t remember. 
  • If you have a study guide, look through it and circle points that you can’t answer from the top of your head. 
  • If you don’t have a study guide, go over your notes or your student book, and analyze the material. Write down the topics that you’re not 100% confident about (you don’t have to be specific here, just make a simple outline). That’s gonna be your personal study guide.

3. Study Plan

When you know how much you need to study every day, you need to create a study plan. The study plan includes what do you need to do with all this material. It can be reading, rewriting notes, practicing problems, memorizing formulas, and etc. As you can see, the study plan will depend on the class and the chapter. 

To create a study plan write down what you need to do every day. 

E.g. Day 1: you need to finish reading 4 sections, rewriting and memorizing definitions you don’t know yet, then you need to practice 2 problems per section. 

Do this sort of thing for every day and for every class you have a final for, and this is gonna be your final exam study plan. 

4. Track your progress

  • It’ll motivate you
  • It’ll make you feel accomplished
  • It’ll make you stay on track every day

I usually track my progress crossing out the number of sections I’ve done. I draw it as a “download bar”. 

Every class is different so they will have a different amount of material. 

5. Switch subjects

Don’t study for one class 5 hours in a row! Switch subjects, give yourself a break, eat.. There’s a Pomodoro technique when you study for about 30 minutes and then have a 5-minute break, and then study for 30 minutes.  

For me, 30 minutes isn’t enough for one study session. I usually study 1 hour and then have a break or I finish 1-2 sections (depending on their size), and then have a break and move on to another subject. 


this got like 4 times longer than I anticipated, I’m really sorry orz It’s basic beginning stuff I guess, stuff that you must have seen everywhere already but I can’t begin to tell you how important it is, at least to me, to know what the hell that mass you’re drawing is. Even if I’m not the best at it (and even if I could use some anatomy studying lately coughcough), it’s something I’m PASSIONATE about and something I consider you have to do, to learn and absorb in order to draw people and be happy with it. Because in my case, once I kinda sorta got the hang of drawing bodies, I felt my hand free, relaxed. I felt happy as hell with what I started being able to draw and I enjoyed drawing bodies 210%

How to stay Positive 🐝

1. Be yourself. Live authentically. To quote Dr. Suess, “There is no one alive that is you’er than you.” Don’t try to be someone you’re not to impress people. You will always be happiest when you are being your true self.

2. Contribute to the world in any way that you can. Maybe for you that’s picking up garbage on your way home from work, or giving money to a homeless person on the street, but you will become a more positive person if you are giving back.

3. Be grateful. Acknowledge how fortunate you are and be thankful that you have simple things like heating, food, and shelter. If you are grateful you will always be able to think more positively.

4. Be optimistic. So maybe you missed your 10:30 showing of Beauty And The Beast, are there later showings? Can you plan a rain check? Wouldn’t coffee be nice instead?

5. Surround yourself with positive people. Odds are, if you spend your time with negative people you’ll become more negative. When we are around positive people we become more positive ourselves.

6. Don’t be discouraged. You will never fail until you stop trying!

7. Be a realist. Everyone has their bad days, everyone. Lest,  I remind you that Walt Disney, J.K. Rowling, and Steven Spielberg, were all rejected before they ever succeeded.

8. Be like Elsa and let it go. Okay so Elsa may not have been the most positive person at first, but by the end of the movie she learned to make a positive out of what was once a negative situation! Don’t hold on to anger, fear, or hurt. Keep moving forward and forgive others and yourself.

9. Help someone else. It’s so easy to make someone’s entire day. Compliment someone’s new clothes or hair cut, hold doors open for people, smile at strangers and share inspirational quotes with friends. You will feel so much happier and positive if you make someone else feel that way.

10. Kick fear to the curb. Stop letting “what if’s” control your life. Be brave and trying something new, or do something that might scare you. Doing something is always better than doing nothing; you might just surprise yourself!

11. Stop and smell the roses. Appreciate everything around you: sights, smells, music. When we don’t take time to breathe we become stressed.

12. Put down those chips. Junk food might make you feel good for a moment but it will only make you feel unhappy down the road. Swap a milkshake for a smoothie, Soda for a glass of water or a cup of green tea, ice cream for a fruit bowl and so on. We can actually eat a lot more raw foods than processed foods without gaining weight or feeling bloated.

13. Get out there. Make plans! Stop scrolling through instagram and snap stories feeling bad about yourself because it’s a Friday night and you’re at home. It’s always nice to stay in every now and then but it’s also enjoyable to get out into the world and socialize.

14. Get your beauty sleep. 7 hours minimum to function and 8 ideally. It’s impossible to be positive when you’re cranky from not getting enough z’s.

15. Exercise. Find the exercise for you. Maybe it’s swimming, hiking, cycling, yoga, dance, or basketball. Working out will make you feel powerful, happy, and accomplished.

16. Don’t compare yourself to others. Other people’s beauty does not take away from your own. Yes, Sarah from math class has a really nice smile…but have you seen yours? Wow.

17. Accept yourself.  Change what you can change and love what you can’t.

18. Don’t sweat the small stuff. Take yourself out of the situation. Is this really a big deal? Will it affect you tomorrow? What about next week? Next month?

19. Be empathetic. Your friend just cancelled your plans for the evening because he is feeling too anxious. What can you say to show him that you’re accepting of his situation? Can you offer up an alternative plan? People want to spend time with people who are kind and accepting of them.

20. Accept that life isn’t linear. There are always going to be ups and downs and that is absolutely normal! You just have to ride the wave  instead of letting yourself drown.

Kiss Scenes 101: How To Write The Perfect Kiss

Anonymous said: Hey there. Not sure what kind of questions you accept but…here goes. Do you have any tips for writing kiss scenes? Not fluffy kiss scenes but really passionate ones. Thanks!

I was hoping to post this on Valentine’s Day, but I got a little busy so it got pushed back. Happy (late) Valentine’s Day, and enjoy!

|| 1 || Detail. Remember that describing a kiss means including more detail than just what is happening and when. Be sure to include description of how the protagonist’s five senses are being affected, as well as some other elements such as:

  • What the protagonist smells
  • What the protagonist tastes
  • What the protagonist hears
  • What the protagonist sees
  • The inner monologue of the protagonist, if the point of view in your story allows it.

|| 2 || Make the kiss(es) realistic. Situational details are a key factor in making the scene more satisfying and memorable. Pay attention to details like the character’s physical characteristics, such as glasses, braces, messy hair, etc. and incorporate those tiny details into the scene.

She turned her head to the left, leaning in to brush her lips against her partner’s, but was interrupted when their noses bumped together, making them both giggle, and the awkwardness fade away.

I mean, sure, that’s not the best example, but at least it’s better than:

Their lips collided, and they made out flawlessly, as if they were in a Nicholas Sparks novel.

Little details like bumping noses, giggling, grinning like an idiot, stumbling, hesitating, etc. can make the scene so much better.

|| 3 || It doesn’t always have to be a full on make out session every time two characters kiss. A lot of the time, kisses are short and sweet and that can be enough to send a substantial spark to the fingers and toes, and send the reader out smiling. Pecks, if only on the cheek, can be more than enough and are extremely underrated.

|| 4 || Pay attention to what your characters do with the rest of their bodies. Kissing is in no way just about the mouth. Keep in mind that most of the time, people don’t just lean forward and mush their faces together. Grab the face, caress the lower back, hold their hand, hell, sweep them off their feet and carry them into the sunset! Don’t just stand there!

|| 5 || Lastly, but not least..ly.. VOCABULARY. Using the right wordage can improve your kiss scene-no, scratch that- ANY SCENE a million times better. I’ve made an entire post on vocabulary and synonyms to use for your sex/kiss scenes {shameless plug} and you can find it: 

HERE HERE HERE HERE HERE HERE HERE HERE

|| 6 || Read kiss scenes as a writer would. Read kiss scenes that you’ve enjoyed and nitpick them to find what you do and don’t like about them, adding the good things to your own scene and being wary of the bad. 

And now, here are some extra tips to get you going:

 I. Practice - If you’re in a relationship or have a really great friend {;)}, practice the act and take notes on how it actually feels! A lot of people who read these kiss scenes take it as the reality because some have never kissed anyone, so teach them how it’s done!

II. Know your characters - Would they actually bite their partner’s lip like that? Would they actually go as far as caressing the majestical inner thigh? Think about it.

III. Add elements of the setting - Are your characters standing in the middle of a crowd? In a high school hallway? Elevator? Include details like sounds and smells and lighting to give the reader a more full-sensory experience.

IV. Dialogue can be fun to play with - Kissing doesn’t always have to be silent. Maybe they break for a second to say “You’re so beautiful” or “Did you pop a mint when I wasn’t looking, oh sneaky one?”. Include those little mutterings or comments because they are some of the best parts.

V. Have someone you trust read it - If you’ve got a good friend who will be honest, have them read and suggest edits. Google docs is fantastic for having your friends read and help you edit your work, because you can change the setting to “suggest edits” and you can see everything they’ve suggested without permanently altering the scene.

DLC Gladio is near and I didn’t feel like drawing something bad-ass to commemorate the occasion also cuz I’m really busy with school right now. So have Gladio and Cor in the beach xD 

How to learn languages by being lazy

So, today I’m gonna talk about how I learned 7 languages (English, Spanish, French, German, ASL, Libras, LSM) by being lazy as f**ck.

The first thing you need to understand is that you need to put your target language on your routine just as your native language. Then, here we go.

• Listen
Just as your native language, it’s very important to listen every single day on the language you’re learning. You can totally do it by listening to a song or a podcast itself.

• Talk
Make native or fluent friends in your TL (you can use apps/sites as Lingbe, Tandem, Interpals) and speak to them, sending audios and texts. A great way to practice almost everyday in a really cool way.

• Play
Playing games it’s also a awesome way: you’ll become kinda addicted to it, then yay, you’re practicing it everyday in a entertaining mode. This can give you hella vocabulary too.

• Read
Reading books (short stories on Wattpad can be great), quotes, newspaper and magazines is a good option as well.

• Watch

I’m pretty sure you love to watch TV shows, TV programs, videos on YouTube, so why not watch all of it in your target language?

You can totally watch your favorite program/tv show dubbed, cool videos and etc.

Tip: if you have Netflix, change the idiom of your profile and pum, it’ll appears lots and lots of movies and tv shows in that language. If you don’t, you can just search on YouTube the movie title that it’ll show.

• Write

Writing a diary (what happened in your day, how you’re feeling…) or stories or poems in your TL can help a lot too. Don’t worry about grammar or vocabulary mistakes, just write, you should do the corrections later.

These are general topics, there may be things that aren’t in your native language routine, so you can also modify this.

I hope this helps you guys, any doubts you can totally ask me! Greetings from Brazil! :)

How do I write?: Dialog

For writers, speaking scenes are either the bane of your existence, or the highlight of your day. On one hand, when characters are talking, it can really help further a scene and help with character development….but on the other hand…writing dialog is such a chore….blugh. So here’s some ways to write better dialog in your stories!

Give Your Characters Voices

Is your character southern? Do they have a lisp? Are they shy? Outspoken? Do they use a lot of big words, or are they an easy talker? Are they more likely to lie with confidence, or do they need to pause a lot to collect their thoughts? These are all factors that help build up a character’s profile, and to add realism to your dialog. Make sure to keep each character consistent – example: if Character A is an angry and resolute character, they wouldn’t stammer or blush when they’re caught off guard – so that your characters keep their individuality.

Embrace the Power of Verbs

Obviously, there’s a huge difference between ‘said’ and ‘yelled’ and ‘screamed’, but there are so many fics where ‘mumbled’ is an overused verb. Unless your character is incredibly shy – or loves to whisper insults under their breath – nobody mumbles every other sentence. ‘Quipped’, ‘snarked,’ ‘said indignantly’, ‘joked’, and ‘laughed’ are some of my favorite verbs.

Moving the Scene Through Dialog 

If you’re ever terrified of having a scene turn into a monotonous he said/she said conversation, then break it up with actions! Have Character A yell at Character B as they angrily slam the car door, or Character C say “huh?” as they try to clear water out of their ears. Here’s a few examples.

  • “You look like crap!” Madison tried to touch the side of her face, but Liz jerked her head back. “Are you like, sick? Your eyes are all red and puffy.”
  • “Yeah, just a second.” Jade watched as the bright orange petals swirled down the drain.
  • Scout visibly recoiled from him. “Uh, no. I’ll pass.”

Talk to Yourself

This is the best trick; it’s what I do when I’m writing dialog. I’ll put on different voices and talk aloud to myself in order to feel what sounds natural and what sounds plastic-y. You may feel ridiculous when you’re up at 2am and repeating the same lines over and over again to yourself, but believe me, it will show in the final drafts when your characters are interacting.

Finally, Have Fun

It’s such a cliche tip that it makes me want to cry from boredom, but having fun with your dialog makes it infinitely easier to write. If your inspiration is just bone dry, have your characters get silly with their dialog – “Sir, that really hella dangerous experiment is going critical” “oh dang, lmao, we should probably leave?” “yes most definitely” – because even then, you’re getting your ideas out and you can come back later. Also, it’s hilarious. In the end, writing is supposed to be a fun hobby, so find what works for you and keep on doing it!

  • people will tell you that you should dress up to make yourself feel more productive. honestly, if you need to go to class in sweats with yesterday’s mascara & a bucket of coffee, do it. whatever gets your ass to class is what works. truly, nobody cares what you look like. 
  • if you’re going to drink, fine, but for the love of all things holy please have a sip of water between every sip of alcohol. I have lived by this rule for all of college and have never had a hangover once. it’s magic 
  • don’t have one-night stands. it’s honestly such a bad idea. you never know what kind of STDs you could be setting yourself up for. 
  • if you have a roommate problem, TALK ABOUT IT before you’re so close to exploding that the tiniest things set you off. your dorm or apartment should be a safe space for you, & only you can make that happen. 
  • don’t be afraid to talk to your RA about  … well, anything. they’re there to support you in your academic, personal, and relational life & they’re getting paid to do that. 
  • eat fresh fruits & veggies at least twice a week. campus food might be more convenient than going to the grocery store, but the freshman 15 is so real. 
  • if at all possible, give yourself a schedule break in the middle of the day so that you can regroup, eat some lunch, & do any extra assignments you didn’t have time to the night before
  • I HIGHLY recommend getting an on-campus job if at all possible. you’ll get something to put on your resume, get some extra cash in the bank, & make some faculty contacts
  • if you have a TA in a class - any class - hit them up. ask them to grab coffee with you. email them with questions, check on your grades, ask them how they’re doing, & say hi when you see them on campus. more often than not, TAs remain a completely untapped resource, but they have so much knowledge (& sometimes some extra influence in the gradebook) that it’s worth taking the time to get to know them
  • ALWAYS BRING CHAPSTICK & A WATER BOTTLE. I DON’T CARE WHERE. CLASS, A DATE, AN INTERVIEW, A FRIEND’S HOUSE, CANADA. EVERYWHERE. 
  • if you didn’t shower this morning, fear not. a baseball cap & deodorant will mask most of yesterday’s bad decisions. 
  • if you have a really important assignment coming up that you forgot about & need to pull an all-nighter for, pull the all-nighter. lots of people on here will tell you to email your professor about it - don’t. if you’re not emailing your prof until the night before with some made-up excuse, they will see right through you. suck it up & do your work. you can nap once your paper is safely turned in. 
  • find a secret place to study and don’t tell anybody about it. the library will always be packed, the lawn outside the business building is sometimes too sunny, & all the best hammocking trees will occasionally be taken. you don’t have to study at your secret spot all the time, but when you need to, it will be there for you. For example, mine is the university president’s conference room, which I stumbled across accidentally when I was a sophomore. the facilities staff that cleans up there knows it’s a bad night when they see me, and they just tell me to make sure the door is closed when I leave. it’s an excellent working relationship. 
  • it does not hurt to suck up to your professors like your life depends on it. they’ll know what you’re doing (if you’re not tactful), but that’s okay. they appreciate, in a weird sort of way.
  • bring 2 blankets with you to university, minimum: one big cozy one for inside or to sleep with, one big outdoor one to study on when the weather’s fine. 
  • wash your pillowcases every time you do laundry. your acne won’t be as bad, & your extra makeup smears from last week’s kegger will be a thing of the past
  • try to keep your weekends mostly free of recurring obligations so that you can go on roommate mini-vacations, drive to the beach, explore your town, or have some you-time. 

that’s all I got right now but I’ll probably make more of these posts tbh. let me know if you have any questions or input for future lists :)

anonymous asked:

How can I be happy?

- let go of the past. 

- forgive yourself.

- live in the present. 

- do things that make you feel good.

- be optimistic, focus on the good.

- surround yourself with people who love and care about you. get rid of the people who don’t.

- whatever your current situation is, learn to appreciate it.

- stop comparing yourself to others.

- stop being so hard on yourself.

- enjoy the little things - like the sunset, the warm weather, your favorite tv show, etc.

- know that good things will happen to you.

Pendulum 101

Alright, pals! Time to learn all about pendulum divination!

Strengths:
-Pendulums are best known for their ability to give quick yes/no answers! -Pendulums are don’t cost a lot of money and are easy to make.
-Pendulums are very easy to pick up and learn quickly… no extensive training needed!

Weaknesses:
-Pendulums require a steady hand, which some people struggle with.
-Pendulums don’t provide in-depth information, just surface-level answers.

How To Do It:
-First, set up a pendulum board. This can be a set board or cloth, or you can scribble it down on an index card. It’s traditionally two perpendicular lines, one for yes and one for no. Other things can be added as well! (Many people include a “Maybe,” “Rephrase the question,” add a circle of numbers or letters, even zodiac signs!)
-Grab your pendulum and “set” it to the board. (I usually do this by tapping each point on the board with the pendulum and saying, “yes, no, one, two,” whatever is appropriate.
-Give it a test run before asking the big questions. Ask it questions you already know, to make sure there isn’t anything interfering with the pendulum. Try to ask at least one yes and one no question!
-Ask your question out loud. Then wait. Eventually the pendulum will start swinging towards your answer!

How It Works:
There are a few different schools of thought, here. Some say your Higher Self guides the pendulum, others say that spirits do. Some say the pendulum itself has a consciousness! Other people attribute its movements to the ideomotor effect. Many skeptics will try to discredit it this way. My personal response? So what if it uses the effect? We all know your subconscious is wayyy smarter than your conscious, so you probably know the answer to your question deep in your gut, somewhere and just need to bring it to the surface. This idea only increases the validity of pendulum divination, in my eyes.

Tips:
-You don’t need a fancy crystal pendulum. Any weighted object on a string will do! This includes necklaces, keys on lanyards, a needle and thread, you get the idea.
-Pendulums are best used indoors in areas without drafts. These air movements could interfere with your reading!
-I find it better to weigh my yes/no questions as a positive affirmation. For example, “Jenny likes me.” The yes/no response here would be very clear, where as “Jenny doesn’t like me” raises questions. Is a “No” because the statement is incorrect, or no because she doesn’t like you? Affirmations also give you the added help of gut feeling. If you say, “Jenny likes me,” and your gut feeling makes it feel like a lie, that’s important information. (Remember your subconscious is smart!)
- If your pendulum is acting weird, try giving it a good cleanse! Sometimes they pick up “gunk” from extended use and get bogged down.
-Pendulums are very useful for contacting spirits! If you hold your pendulum still and call for a spirit, they can signal their presence by moving it. I prefer this over tarot because tarot always guarantees a response, whether a spirit is there or not. Pendulum, meanwhile, is better for confirming your answers are genuine.

If you’d like to see me do any other posts like this one, let me know! :)