how many edits can i make using just the covers

anonymous asked:

Do you have any references on how to write a cover letter? Thanks!

I would suggest using a template to help with the technical side of formatting. Keep the design simple, clean cut, and professional. You can find some good ones just by opening word, click on new, and typing cover letter in the box that says “search office.com for templates”.

Proofread thoroughly, but beware of over editing. Sometimes we look at something for too long and make so many changes that we miss simple typos and errors from moving things around too much. Avoid this by having someone else proofread for you.

10

my animorphs playlist masterpost!

  • WE WON (or we think we did) - general (x)
  • idiot teenagers with a deathwish - score (x)
  • two of you, two of me - rachel/tobias (x)
  • whatever happened to us? - jake/cassie (x)
  • leader - jake (x)
  • warrior - rachel (x)
  • dreamer - tobias (x)
  • peacemaker - cassie (x)
  • joker - marco (x)
  • alien - ax (x)
  • adversary - david (x)
PICTURE TAKING TUTORIAL: THE BASICS PART II

As promised too long ago, part two of picture taking basics.

*******************************************************************************************

If you haven’t read my original photography tutorial, you can find it HERE.  Much of that information is going to be needed in order to use this tutorial.

This tutorial has come about after seeing the same “beginner” mistakes being made over and over during the Battle of the Bands competition.  I hope that part two of Basic Sim Photography helps people not to butcher their pictures on cropping and resizing. Improper cropping and resizing can make what would normally be a good picture look like total crap. So, having said that, let’s get started.

In addition to the items listed in the original photography tutorial you are going to need a graphics editing program. I don’t care what program you use as long as it’s not MSPaint. Paint really isn’t designed to do much of anything.

The first thing we are going to talk about is picture quality and size. At this point I am going to assume that you have read the first tutorial and know how to set up your picture and get the highest quality possible. If you haven’t read it, please do so. The section you want is “Taking the Picture”.  I will wait.

Got that information now? Good. We can move on.

I am going to admit right now that the pictures that I took for this tutorial could be better. I snapped them in a hurry and was just worried about getting what was needed.

Our starting point:

External image

It’s a very basic picture of an alien couple. Well, they are supposed to be aliens, anyway. It’s not the best picture and a lot can be done to make it better to show them off.

Step One:

External image

Everyone is familiar with this this bit of the Sims 3 interface. What you are going to do is click on the down arrow and hold it until your screen is done moving. That is going to more or less set your camera straight.

Step Two: Hit the TAB button. That takes you into camera mode. You can now position your camera to where you want it using the arrow keys and your mouse wheel.  You can zoom in as close as you want with your arrow keys then use your mouse wheel to zoom out in order cut out things you don’t want in the picture. You do have to be careful where you don’t get a fish eye image. This is kind of hard to demonstrate in a written tutorial so play around with the arrow keys and mouse wheel to see how things work. Switch between normal mode and camera mode while you are doing this. Playing with things and seeing how they work is the best way to learn the techniques for taking pictures and developing your personal style.

Zooming in to focus on your subject and cutting out a lot of the stuff in the background will give you something like this:

External image

Better than the original picture, and depending on what you are using it for, it could be acceptable so we are going to keep this version. We are also going to go one step further and get an even better picture.

Step Three: This is neat and for the longest time I forgot that I could do it. While in camera mode you can use SHIFT+A or SHIFT+D to tilt your camera. Forget titling it. We are going to turn everything 90 degrees. My screen resolution is 1920 x 1080 and that is the size that pictures turn out like the one above. So, instead of my picture being 1920 x 1080 it’s going to become 1080 x 1920 when I am done with it.

This is how the initial picture is going to look.

External image

After turning it 90 degrees in my graphics program it now looks like this:

External image

You do NOT want to use the Windows Image Viewer to rotate images. It may leave a line down one side of the photo that looks like a shadow.

This larger second picture is much easier to work with for editing. To maintain quality it’s always better to start with a larger picture and go smaller than use a small image and go larger.

Now that we have a picture to work with we are going to talk about cropping and resizing. Some of the things that I see people do makes me want to cry. For example, the band poster requirement for the Battle of the Bands is an image 831x1169. This is also the image size we use when asking for cover pictures for Rising Stars. I can not tell you how many times I have gotten images that were just resized to those dimensions.

This sort of things makes me die a little on the inside.

External image

I have also been sent a number of other crazy things.

So, we are now going to talk about this resizing and cropping thing. This is where you are going to need your graphics editing program. I use Photoshop but we aren’t doing anything that will need more than a basic understanding of whatever graphics program you use.

For this part of the tutorial I am going to use this picture and I am going to show you how I would crop and resize it to use as an avatar picture. This technique works no matter what you want to resize and crop for.

External image

For an avatar picture I like working with a 512 x 512 image. It’s just personal preference. So, the first thing I am going to do is going into my graphics program and create a 512 x 512 empty canvas. Next I am going to open my picture.

Now, for resizing.

ALWAYS, there is never any exception to this, resize things where things stay in scale. This means use whatever setting it is that tells the program to scale everything in proportion. You also need to resize based on where you are going to crop your picture. In this case the final image is going to be 512 x 512. This means that I want to set the height to 512.

External image

Had I resized the width for 512 the height would have been too short and it wouldn’t have worked.

External image

However, this doesn’t mean you will never resize the width instead of the height. When making banners the width is normally the part that gets resized. I hope all that makes sense.

Now we are going to take our 910 x 512 image and make it 512 x 512.

Remember that blank 512 x 512 canvas we made? Copy your image and paste it to that canvas and center it. Flatten and save your image. Now you have one beautifully cropped and resized picture.

External image

Remember I said that we used 831 x 1169 dimensions at Simatography for various things? Remember that I also said that my screen resolution was 1920 x 1080? 1169 is a much larger height than 1080. This is where one of those long pictures where we turned the camera 90 degrees is going to be needed.

We need a blank canvas of 831 x 1169. Next we are going to open our long picture and turn it 90 degrees. (I am going to admit up front that this is not the best picture to use for this tutorial because of my camera position.)

External image

Resize by setting the height at 1169 and keeping the sizing in proportion.

External image

One again we are going to copy  our image and paste it to our empty canvas. I coloured my canvas the same colour as the image background.

Again, resized and cropped without image distortion to fit it’s purpose.

External image

It really depends on the usage of the image if you are going to be using a standard image as it’s taken in game or if you are going to need to rotate your camera 90 degrees. You always want to rezise before you crop and, while there are always exceptions, it’s best to copy and paste your resized image onto whatever sized canvas you want your final picture to be.

Now, go forth and create images that aren’t awkwardly resized. :)