how is this in the newspaper

do ya’ll understand how a video like that is made? it isn’t even on location. hours of effort went into that. every stroke of the marker, every ripping of the paper, every bounce of the letters, every article placed in a position and animated.. like.. saying its a coincidence or whatever is so fucking dumb. its like people don’t grasp how the video was made. they didn’t just google “newspaper background for music video”. each article was chosen by a team of people led by the artist’s vision lmao. and its not a coincidence they highlight issues faced by the minorities. it literally cannot be a coincidence.

akatriel-rowanborn  asked:

Tbh, I think we DID see, for ourselves, how Dark acts. The newspaper clippings mentioned that the Mayor was having legal trouble. Who but the new District Attorney should be one of his oldest and dearest friends? One whom he immediately speaks to about fixing up the city, making us want to help? And why, if Celine could return us to our body, did we "need" him? I think he just took the chance to switch to our body. And maybe even our life.

I’m sure he had shady and manipulative activities before becoming Dark, he still retains lots of Damien’s characteristics, only twisted. I would just like to see more of him working.

Unless, or course, the whole event is a fabrication and an example of Dark at work. It is shot like a tv show with the intros at the beginning. The end result being increased sympathy and compassion for the manipulator.

anonymous asked:

hey cakie! re: how to get other art jobs, the 'fancier' art sites like behance or conceptart or whatever have job listings for bigger-scale projects, but they're usually on the design side or look for a Professional-with-a-capital-P. Another option is to send your portfolio to any local publishers/editors who might be looking for illustrations (magazines, newspapers, publishing houses, etc). they're usually swamped with these kinds of emails though so it's hard to get a bite. good luck!!!!

Whether you’re writing for a video game or a tabletop game, the secret to effective lore is cow tools.

Back in 1982, Gary Larson drew the following panel for the newspaper comic The Far Side:

According to Larson, it was simply meant to be a faintly surreal joke about how cows would be bad at making tools; it intends no deeper commentary. However, in the decades since, it’s become by far the comic’s most asked-about panel. People want to know why cows are making tools, what aspect of society it’s commenting on, and most critically, they want to know what the tools are for. The one on the right kind of resembles a carpenter’s saw, which leads folks to believe that the other three must have some obvious function too, if only they could puzzle it out.

But they don’t. They’re just random shapes, and the comic as a whole was never intended to actually mean anything.

I’ve become convinced that that’s the real secret to effective worldbuilding in gaming media. Certainly, the “core” of the setting should make sense, but all the peripheral stuff surrounding it? Just throw in a bunch of incomprehensible bullshit seasoned with the occasional bit that almost makes sense, and people will seize on those bits and ratonalise all the rest of it for you - and what they come up with is generally going to be way more interesting than whatever your original plan was, if indeed you had one at all.

Then, once they’ve figured it all out, just nod sagely, congratulate their cleverness, and keep your damn mouth shut.

WKM - What happened?

I’m going to cover all of this mess in this post. It’s just what I think could be the truly amazing story behind this amazing video series. 

There are LOTS of questions in my own head and I’m gonna try answering (hopefully) most of them! Here we go!

WHO KILLED HIM NOW?

The biggest question raised is, obviously, who killed Markiplier? From what we could gather throughout the series, demons are likely to exist in this scenario.

Even the newspaper gives a hint that the mayor might have been a “demon in disguise”. So there are spiritual, supernatural things happening here. I, for one, can not answer the biggest question out of all, how he died and who he was killed by. I can only make one assumption; here’s my theory.

We know that Mark’s body went missing at some point. Where exactly is never shown or hinted at, but I have a likely theory that Mark himself was the one to hide his own body in form of his spirit. Or just, behind all that was happening in general. However, what we do know is that Mark, I quote (Damien): “(He) trapped us here in this broken shell and we had no way out.” 

It seems established that, during the time we were outside to talk to the gardener, Damien and Celine tried to reach out to Mark(’s ghost), hence she wanted to “talk to the dead”. During that time, Mark took the chance to inhabit Damien’s body and trap him inside his own, dead shell that could not be used anymore. Whilst doing so he either accidentally killed Celine by possessing her first, her not being able to hold the soul inside her body, OR Celine did not die and let Damien inside her body to save him from being thrown into the corpse, which would explain why she was red and blue in the end sequence of Chapter 3. She also appears to be having two pairs of eyes above her head at one point. Possibly a hint that she’s two in one at that point?

Either way, we know that Damien represents BLUE and Celine represents RED thanks to the ending of Chapter 4:

Which is why it could very well be that She kept Damien’s soul inside her body for a short while to save his life. And of course Damien was PISSED after that, betrayed by whom he cared for, who he fought Will for and whom he thought was a good, a childhood friend he could trust. That’s for the angry step towards us, the angry stare. He looks at us, knowingly. He chooses his victim that very moment.

We are told to run. The door closes and Celine does not come out. Her shell possibly broke and both souls were set free without a shell, or she kept it up and waited for the right moment to talk to us. 

The right moment being the time Will shot us.

And here is the thing; We did NOT die. If you listen closely, you can hear a faint heartbeat in the background during this very scene. They both tell you to believe them, tell you stories to make you feel sorry for them. Which, of course, you do. Damien seems pissed and loses his temper once more, like he did with the Colonel before, and shouts angrily that Mark walks around in his body. Which is why I think that part is true. He couldn’t take his anger in. He can’t, he has a low temper, that’s just it.

But Celine reminds him that he “can’t do this right now”. Reminds us to believe them. What you’re told is that Mark trapped both of them inside his old, dead body and that they brought you there so you have a chance to survive. Damien tells you that you can’t survive on your own and Celine says she can bring you back the same way she brought you there. But what Damien says afterwards is the most important clue.

He says: “But you can’t survive on your own. You’re .. dead, after all. (…) I know this all sounds crazy. Honestly, I don’t know what the fuck is going on. But I know that I trust Celine. And if you trust us … let me in. We can fix this.”

Gathered: Damien lies to you after all this time of actually being genuine. He was betrayed by Mark, knows that you trust him, wants revenge and is angry. He lures you into a false sense of security, tells you you can fix this together. He makes you feel like a friend by telling you that he feels the same way about all of this. And then, he mentions that oh so beloved trust of his. That one thing he completely lost thanks to Mark. 

Also important to note; It is ONLY DAMIEN that inhabits your body after all of this. Why is that?
Celine states that she can send “you” back, not “us”. She says “you” have a choice. And Damien ends his sentence with “let me in.” Not let us in.

You trust Damien and he tells you that it will work, he promises.

And it does work! You wake up in your own body, get up, meet the Colonel who is completely out of it by now.

He does not recognize us as a “Dark” or “Damien” because we don’t look like Damien yet and Dark doesn’t exist yet either. Damien, at this point, is inside our body and trying to take over. 

We listen to what Will says and see him, in desperation and utter confusion, try to find his dear friends he lost.

Once he’s away, only THEN do we walk over to the mirror. And here is where it gets interesting.

We take Damien’s cane: Take a look at the hands.

A thin, female and young looking hand (possibly Amy wee i love her), but then something happens.

The hand changes, transforms into a different one. Into a hand similar to Damien’s. Because Damien is inhabiting your body by himself. Celine is likely still in Mark’s body or, as I mentioned earlier, never died to begin with. It’s Damien who was so fed up, he had to use you to get what he wants. And he gets it alright:

A body. A shell to use as a puppet. He transformed your body into a copy of his own. Mark likely still uses actual Damien’s body, but Damien had to make you look like him to finish this with you. 

Then this happens.

And sad music plays in the background all throughout this scene and it broke my heart - but why did it break my heart? Because that right there is a representation of broken trust, my friends. Damien threw us out of the body he stole from us and trapped us either behind our screens or in that mirror (hence the weird noise light inside the crack). He used us. He manipulated us. We were his first victim.

And he feels bad about it at first. Note how Dark’s look changes after he throws us out? Because now we can see what he truly is; a broken man. He had so much trust in Mark, in us. He was a genuine, good and kind hearted man. He neglected his other friends for Mark only to then find himself betrayed by Mark or whatever he had unleashed that day. He is troubled, his emotions are a whirlwind and all the while he has to keep his anger inside. After all, Damien has a short and low temper. Guilty about what happened, he looks up at you.

Reminds himself that he has a goal now; take revenge. Looks at you now with almost disgust to make you feel even worse. This is a reflection of his own emotions that very moment. We are supposed to feel exactly what Damien felt. Betrayal, fear, loneliness. An end. The mirror itself is a genius metaphor for this.

He then leaves us. Clearly guided by rage and hatred and you can FEEL that, I get goosebumps just thinking about this. (@markiplier frickin amazing acting, dude!) Anyway, here he makes up his mind to take back control over what is rightfully his. Mark; his own body.

We are then left in darkness, questioning and clueless, sad and quite literally broken. 

Dark’s origin, ladies and gentlemen.

(just my take on this. It’s probably, like, super wrong lmao also sorry for the long post ilyall)

If anyone ever tries to tell you that slavery never existed in Canada, they’re lying to your face and are perpetuating myths of Canadian benevolence and US-Canada contrasts. They’re ignoring over 200 years of enslavement, and the recorded 2,683 Indigenous slaves, mainly from the Pawnee Nation, and the recorded 1,443 Black slaves that occupied New France ALONE before the Conquest by the British. By the way, the entire population of New France back then was apx. 60,000, and the enslaved population made up 4,200 of those.

(So if French Canadians tell you that slavery appeared with the British Conquest, in actuality the British took steps to make it easier for people to own slaves through Article XLVII of the Articles of Capitulation, that many French settlers at that time took advantage of.)

Slaves were held by fur trading post officers, colonial officials, members of the military, Jesuits, Roman Catholic Churches, Baptist Churches, 50% of the later Quebec Parliament, and the common people who often went into debt to have the status symbol of owning a slave.

In 1781, the island of St. John (now P.E.I) passed a law that legalized slavery and paid a 40 shilling bonus for every Black slave brought into the province. In 1790, the Imperial Statute allowed British Loyalists from the states to bring in slaves to the whole country without tax. The same went for the cutlery, furniture, and farm tools they brought with them.

People will try to tell you that Indigenous people owned slaves as well. They kept prisoners of war and exchanged people to pay off debts and replace war-dead, but they were never dehumanized like slaves under European slavery. The two systems are not the same and aren’t even remotely interchangeable.

Slaves weren’t treated like members of the family or like well-loved butlers. They were subject to the same treatment endured by slaves in the 13 colonies. Ownership was justified in similar ways as well: using the Labour Supply argument, where white workers were “too costly” to hire and Black slaves were sometimes said to be “too expensive to import from the French Caribbean.” (They were sold here anyways.) This explains the higher amount of Indigenous slaves.

It also means that Black people have been in Canada for as long as whites; the first recorded slave in Canada showed up in 1629. He was from either Madagascar or Guinea.

People will cite Canada’s lack of a Code Noir as proof of a lack of slavery. Just because we didn’t have a specific document to regulate it doesn’t mean it didn’t exist. It did. There are newspaper advertisements in such papers as the Montreal Gazette for runaway slaves and slaves that were up for sale.

The life expectancy of a slave in Canada was 17 years old. The 1790 Act to Limit Slavery pushed by John Simcoe said that slaves born after 1790 would be freed at age 25. See how that doesn’t work?

But most importantly, people will try to tell you that slaves didn’t resist. They did. They launched legal protests and challenges, but were opposed by Judicial members who owned slaves themselves.

Well-known Canadian figures who owned slaves include but aren’t limited to:

James McGill of McGill University fame, Joseph Brant, Sir John Johnson, and William Jarvis.

Modern historians and scholars have tried to deny this. A historian who tried to tell the true story was Professor Marcel Trudel, who wrote “Canada’s Forgotten Slaves: 200 Years of Bondage” in the 1960’s. He was shunned by the academic community, relocated to Ottawa University from his previous chair, and was personally asked by Quebec politicians to stay quiet about the matter because he revealed that slavery existed in New France before the British - destroying the idea of French Canadian moral superiority in that regard. He died in 2011, and his book which so many tried to discredit but so many never could, was only translated into English in 2013.

Slavery existed in Canada. Don’t let anyone tell you differently.

Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully - in Ten Minutes

by Stephen King
(reprinted in Sylvia K. Burack, ed. The Writer’s Handbook. Boston, MA: Writer, Inc., 1988: 3-9)

I. The First Introduction

THAT’S RIGHT. I know it sounds like an ad for some sleazy writers’ school, but I really am going to tell you everything you need to pursue a successful and financially rewarding career writing fiction, and I really am going to do it in ten minutes, which is exactly how long it took me to learn.  It will actually take you twenty minutes or so to read this essay, however, because I have to tell you a story, and then I have to write a second introduction.  But these, I argue, should not count in the ten minutes.



II. The Story, or, How Stephen King Learned to Write

When I was a sophomore in high school, I did a sophomoric thing which got me in a pot of fairly hot water, as sophomoric didoes often do.  I wrote and published a small satiric newspaper called The Village Vomit.  In this little paper I lampooned a number of teachers at Lisbon (Maine) High School, where I was under instruction.  These were not very gentle lampoons; they ranged from the scatological to the downright cruel

Eventually, a copy of this little newspaper found its way into the hands of a faculty member, and since I had been unwise enough to put my name on it (a fault, some critics argue, of which I have still not been entirely cured), I was brought into the office. The sophisticated satirist had by that time reverted to what he really was: a fourteen-year-old kid who was shaking in his boots and wondering if he was going to get a suspension … what we called “a three-day vacation” in those dim days of 1964.

I wasn’t suspended. I was forced to make a number of apologies - they were warranted, but they still tasted like dog-dirt in my mouth - and spent a week in detention hall. And the guidance counselor arranged what he no doubt thought of as a more constructive channel for my talents. This was a job - contingent upon the editor’s approval - writing sports for the Lisbon Enterprise, a twelve-page weekly of the sort with which any small-town resident will be familiar. This editor was the man who taught me everything I know about writing in ten minutes. His name was John Gould - not the famed New England humorist or the novelist who wrote The Greenleaf Fires, but a relative of both, I believe.

He told me he needed a sports writer and we could “try each other out” if I wanted.

I told him I knew more about advanced algebra than I did sports.

Gould nodded and said, “You’ll learn.”

I said I would at least try to learn. Gould gave me a huge roll of yellow paper and promised me a wage of 1/2¢ per word. The first two pieces I wrote had to do with a high school basketball game in which a member of my school team broke the Lisbon High scoring record. One of these pieces was straight reportage. The second was a feature article.

I brought them to Gould the day after the game, so he’d have them for the paper, which came out Fridays. He read the straight piece, made two minor corrections, and spiked it. Then he started in on the feature piece with a large black pen and taught me all I ever needed to know about my craft. I wish I still had the piece - it deserves to be framed, editorial corrections and all - but I can remember pretty well how it looked when he had finished with it. Here’s an example:

(note: this is before the edit marks indicated on King’s original copy)

Last night, in the well-loved gymnasium of Lisbon High School, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom, known as “Bullet” Bob for both his size and accuracy, scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his knight-like quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon thinclads since 1953….

(after edit marks)

Last night, in the Lisbon High School gymnasium, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon’s basketball team since 1953….

When Gould finished marking up my copy in the manner I have indicated above, he looked up and must have seen something on my face. I think he must have thought it was horror, but it was not: it was revelation.

“I only took out the bad parts, you know,” he said. “Most of it’s pretty good.”

“I know,” I said, meaning both things: yes, most of it was good, and yes, he had only taken out the bad parts. “I won’t do it again.”

“If that’s true,” he said, “you’ll never have to work again. You can do this for a living.” Then he threw back his head and laughed.

And he was right; I am doing this for a living, and as long as I can keep on, I don’t expect ever to have to work again.



III. The Second Introduction

All of what follows has been said before. If you are interested enough in writing to be a purchaser of this magazine, you will have either heard or read all (or almost all) of it before. Thousands of writing courses are taught across the United States each year; seminars are convened; guest lecturers talk, then answer questions, then drink as many gin and tonics as their expense-fees will allow, and it all boils down to what follows.

I am going to tell you these things again because often people will only listen - really listen - to someone who makes a lot of money doing the thing he’s talking about. This is sad but true. And I told you the story above not to make myself sound like a character out of a Horatio Alger novel but to make a point: I saw, I listened, and I learned. Until that day in John Gould’s little office, I had been writing first drafts of stories which might run 2,500 words. The second drafts were apt to run 3,300 words. Following that day, my 2,500-word first drafts became 2,200-word second drafts. And two years after that, I sold the first one.

So here it is, with all the bark stripped off. It’ll take ten minutes to read, and you can apply it right away…if you listen.



IV. Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully

1.  BE TALENTED
This, of course, is the killer.  What is talent?  I can hear someone shouting, and here we are, ready to get into a discussion right up there with “what is the meaning of life?” for weighty pronouncements and total uselessness.  For the purposes of the beginning writer, talent may as well be defined as eventual success - publication and money.  If you wrote something for which someone sent you a check, if you cashed the check and it didn’t bounce, and if you then paid the light bill with the money, I consider you talented.

Now some of you are really hollering.  Some of you are calling me one crass money-fixated creep.  And some of you are calling me bad names.  Are you calling Harold Robbins talented?  someone in one of the Great English Departments of America is screeching.  V.C. Andrews?  Theodore Dreiser?  Or what about you, you dyslexic moron?

Nonsense.  Worse than nonsense, off the subject.  We’re not talking about good or bad here.  I’m interested in telling you how to get your stuff published, not in critical judgments of who’s good or bad.  As a rule the critical judgments come after the check’s been spent, anyway.  I have my own opinions, but most times I keep them to myself.  People who are published steadily and are paid for what they are writing may be either saints or trollops, but they are clearly reaching a great many someones who want what they have.  Ergo, they are communicating.  Ergo, they are talented.  The biggest part of writing successfully is being talented, and in the context of marketing, the only bad writer is one who doesn’t get paid.  If you’re not talented, you won’t succeed.  And if you’re not succeeding, you should know when to quit.

When is that?  I don’t know.  It’s different for each writer.  Not after six rejection slips, certainly, nor after sixty.  But after six hundred?  Maybe.  After six thousand?  My friend, after six thousand pinks, it’s time you tried painting or computer programming.

Further, almost every aspiring writer knows when he is getting warmer - you start getting little jotted notes on your rejection slips, or personal letters…maybe a commiserating phone call.  It’s lonely out there in the cold, but there are encouraging voices…unless there is nothing in your words which warrants encouragement.  I think you owe it to yourself to skip as much of the self-illusion as possible.  If your eyes are open, you’ll know which way to go…or when to turn back.

2.  BE NEAT
Type.  Double-space.  Use a nice heavy white paper, never that erasable onion-skin stuff.  If you’ve marked up your manuscript a lot, do another draft.

3.  BE SELF-CRITICAL
If you haven’t marked up your manuscript a lot, you did a lazy job.  Only God gets things right the first time.  Don’t be a slob.

4.  REMOVE EVERY EXTRANEOUS WORD
You want to get up on a soapbox and preach?  Fine.  Get one and try your local park.  You want to write for money?  Get to the point.  And if you remove all the excess garbage and discover you can’t find the point, tear up what you wrote and start all over again…or try something new.

5.  NEVER LOOK AT A REFERENCE BOOK WHILE DOING A FIRST DRAFT You want to write a story?  Fine.  Put away your dictionary, your encyclopedias, your World Almanac, and your thesaurus.  Better yet, throw your thesaurus into the wastebasket.  The only things creepier than a thesaurus are those little paperbacks college students too lazy to read the assigned novels buy around exam time.  Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word.  There are no exceptions to this rule.  You think you might have misspelled a word?  O.K., so here is your choice: either look it up in the dictionary, thereby making sure you have it right - and breaking your train of thought and the writer’s trance in the bargain - or just spell it phonetically and correct it later.  Why not?  Did you think it was going to go somewhere?  And if you need to know the largest city in Brazil and you find you don’t have it in your head, why not write in Miami, or Cleveland?  You can check it…but laterWhen you sit down to write, write.  Don’t do anything else except go to the bathroom, and only do that if it absolutely cannot be put off.

6.  KNOW THE MARKETS
Only a dimwit would send a story about giant vampire bats surrounding a high school to McCall’s.  Only a dimwit would send a tender story about a mother and daughter making up their differences on Christmas Eve to Playboy…but people do it all the time.  I’m not exaggerating; I have seen such stories in the slush piles of the actual magazines.  If you write a good story, why send it out in an ignorant fashion?  Would you send your kid out in a snowstorm dressed in Bermuda shorts and a tank top?  If you like science fiction, read the magazines.  If you want to write confession stories, read the magazines.  And so on.  It isn’t just a matter of knowing what’s right for the present story; you can begin to catch on, after awhile, to overall rhythms, editorial likes and dislikes, a magazine’s entire slant.  Sometimes your reading can influence the next story, and create a sale.

7.  WRITE TO ENTERTAIN
Does this mean you can’t write “serious fiction”?  It does not.  Somewhere along the line pernicious critics have invested the American reading and writing public with the idea that entertaining fiction and serious ideas do not overlap.  This would have surprised Charles Dickens, not to mention Jane Austen, John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, Bernard Malamud, and hundreds of others.  But your serious ideas must always serve your story, not the other way around.  I repeat: if you want to preach, get a soapbox.

8.  ASK YOURSELF FREQUENTLY, AM I HAVING FUN?”
The answer needn’t always be yes.  But if it’s always no, it’s time for a new project or a new career.

9.  HOW TO EVALUATE CRITICISM
Show your piece to a number of people - ten, let us say.  Listen carefully to what they tell you.  Smile and nod a lot.  Then review what was said very carefully.  If your critics are all telling you the same thing about some facet of your story - a plot twist that doesn’t work, a character who rings false, stilted narrative, or half a dozen other possibles - change that facet.  It doesn’t matter if you really liked that twist of that character; if a lot of people are telling you something is wrong with you piece, it is.  If seven or eight of them are hitting on that same thing, I’d still suggest changing it.  But if everyone - or even most everyone - is criticizing something different, you can safely disregard what all of them say.

10.  OBSERVE ALL RULES FOR PROPER SUBMISSION
Return postage, self-addressed envelope, all of that.

11.  AN AGENT?  FORGET IT.  FOR NOW
Agents get 10% of monies earned by their clients.  10% of nothing is nothing.  Agents also have to pay the rent.  Beginning writers do not contribute to that or any other necessity of life.  Flog your stories around yourself.  If you’ve done a novel, send around query letters to publishers, one by one, and follow up with sample chapters and/or the manuscript complete.  And remember Stephen King’s First Rule of Writers and Agents, learned by bitter personal experience: You don’t need one until you’re making enough for someone to steal…and if you’re making that much, you’ll be able to take your pick of good agents.

12.  IF IT’S BAD, KILL IT
When it comes to people, mercy killing is against the law.  When it comes to fiction, it is the law.



That’s everything you need to know.  And if you listened, you can write everything and anything you want.  Now I believe I will wish you a pleasant day and sign off.

My ten minutes are up.

#awkward #pining #ministry

Prompts: @tera2
Author: @queenofthyme

Harry read the article again. He didn’t know why he put himself through it. Rita Skeeter’s outlandish claims never failed to make him angry. And he’d already forced The Daily Prophet to run a redaction days ago. 

No, he did know, actually. It was the accompanying image. The one with Draco Malfoy staring right into the camera, unblinking, a challenge in his eyes. It was familiar but at the same time nothing Harry had ever seen before (except during his many rereads of this particular paper). Malfoy had aged. Matured obviously since he was now a Ministry official. There was just something about his face. The same but different. Harry was drawn to it.

“Auror Potter." 

Harry looked up to find that same face at his doorway, focusing a steely gaze on Harry. He was so shocked he forgot he was holding a cup of tea. It dropped to his desk with an embarrassing clatter, spilling its contents, all over Malfoy’s inked face.  

The Malfoy at Harry’s office door – the real one – didn’t move. His eyes flickered down to Harry’s desk, watching the spill unfold passively.

Harry jumped to his feet and quickly bundled up the wet paper, throwing it face down into a waste basket at his feet. He wasn’t sure if he’d been fast enough.

He looked back up to Malfoy, searching for any sign he might have seen. Nothing. But that hardly meant much. Harry suspected Malfoy’s emotions didn’t play so obviously on his face anymore. He nodded in what he hoped was a professional courteous manner. "Dralfoy.”

Harry froze, the awful blunder hitting his ears just as it came out of his mouth. He could feel himself blushing, his palms getting clammy, his knees weak. Was simply Malfoy’s presence enough to make him come undone these days?

And just when he thought things couldn’t get worse, Harry, not quite sure how much longer he’d be able to stand for, slumped back into his seat - or at least attempted to – but misjudged the position and ended up plummeting to the floor instead.

The only saving grace – if there was any positive to the situation at all – was that at least on the floor, behind his desk, he was hidden from sight. He wondered if he crawled under his desk and stayed there, if Malfoy would get the idea and leave. Harry was seriously considering the option when Malfoy came into view again, stepping around the desk to loom over Harry.

He offered a hand. Harry gladly took it, forgetting for a moment the current predicament of said hands. And sure enough, after Malfoy helped Harry to his feet, he quickly let go and wiped his hand on his trousers.

Harry wanted to close his eyes and crawl up into a ball in the corner of the room. He never wanted to look Malfoy in the eye again. In less than a minute, he had made himself look like a complete fool. And all it took was for Malfoy to walk in the bloody room.

Malfoy cleared his throat. “I just came by to say hello. I thought it was polite given we work in the same building now. Which, of course, you already know.” His eyes darted to the waste basket. Shit.

“I had The Daily Prophet write a redaction,” Harry blurted out, as if that would help. Although at least he managed to get the words right this time.

“That was you? I should have guessed. You never miss an opportunity to save my skin.” Malfoy’s lips quirked upward for the smallest moment before his composure returned. “Well, it was nice seeing how the other side lives. I suppose I must get back to it.”

“Right,” Harry managed to nod. “I’ll get the door for you.”

They both stared at the open door.

Having already committed to the pointless task, Harry hurried forward and tripped over his own feet, falling right into Malfoy’s waiting – his reflexes were still as fast as they were in Quidditch – arms. Could Harry be more embarrassing?

Malfoy righted Harry but kept a firm grip on him – perhaps he thought Harry might slump to the floor otherwise, which was probably an accurate assumption at this stage.

There was amusement in Malfoy’s face now, a lightness in his eyes. “Are you always this clumsy, Potter, or am I special?”

“You’re special,” Harry answered quickly as he didn’t want Malfoy to think this was how all his mornings went. Although, after he realised what he’d said, he quickly tried to take it back: “No, I mean, wait, I mean, that’s not what I  -“

Malfoy took a step back, dropping his arms. “No need to be so flustered, Potter,” he interrupted. “I keep all the newspapers with your face on them too.”

Harry’s brain short-circuited. He must have stood there blinking at Malfoy for a solid five seconds before he was able to ask: “All of them?”

“Thirty-four and counting.” Malfoy winked. “You know, Potter, if you were to take me out to dinner, I’m sure the outing might be scandalous enough to make the front page. We could add to both our collections.”

“If I – you – dinner?” Harry repeated, a little discombobulated.

“Why, Potter,” Malfoy said, a cheeky smile appearing on his face, “I thought you’d never ask. I’d love to.”

Harry blinked – it was the only action he was capable of.

Malfoy laughed lightly when Harry didn’t reply. He made to exit, but paused briefly to call out over his shoulder: “I finish at six.”

Only when Malfoy was out of view did Harry let his knees give in.

more like this l @queenofthyme

advice for people in school, taking notes

yo, since it’s that time of year, here’s my unsolicited advice on how to take notes. it’s primarily for college or high school folks but i suppose anyone who is in a positive to take notes could use this.

here’s the advice:

make your notes as CASUAL as possible. by which i mean, put them in your voice, make them funny, use memes, write out information as if you were texting it to your friend, curse!, use everyday phrases and weird internet speak, relate it to your life if possible!, fucking hashtag that shit, relate it to things you like, write out academic articles like they are just Drama happening to your friends, etc etc– do this in class and when doing the readings and when making studying guides for tests!!

even if you are taking notes on the reading and you have NO IDEA what is going on (real talk: im doing reading for my english masters right now and i have NO IDEA what this man is saying), try to get the basic gist or even if you can tell the writer feels negatively or positively towards a particular subject, WRITE THAT SHIT DOWN. 

Here are honest to god, some examples from my notes right now:

  • I have literally no idea what this man is saying– it seems to be something about God?– the difference between learning stuff just for the sake of learning and learning stuff to make order and sense and “find God” 
  • Culture is the study of perfection and goes beyond religion because we make up religion and culture is about more than us?? its possible that’s what this dude is saying. i give it a 60-40 shot.
  • DONT TRUST MACHINERY. EVERYTHING IS MACHINERY. WEALTH IS JUST MACHINERY. CULTURE MATTERS OVER MONEY/MACHINERY/RELIGION/EVERYTHINGGG. GOOO CULTURE!
  • will he ever writer a sentence shorter than 8 lines long??? #probablynot
  • I am not totally convinced by his culture= perfection argument but then again that could be the exact opposite of what he’s saying. 
  • “Another newspaper, representing, like the Nonconformist, one of the religious organisations of this country, was a short time ago giving an account of the crowd at Epsom on the Derby day, and of all the vice and hideousness which was to be seen in that crowd; and then the writer turned suddenly round upon Professor Huxley, and asked him how he proposed to cure all this vice and hideousness without religion. I confess I felt disposed to ask the asker this question: And how do you propose to cure it with such a religion as yours? How is the ideal of a life so unlovely, so unattractive, so narrow, so far removed from a true and satisfying ideal of human perfection, as is the life of your religious organisation as you yourself image it, to conquer and transform all this vice and hideousness?” 10 – I mean i do fuck with this part tho
  • He’s at Oxford. Fucking loves Oxford. On Oxford’s dick

the point is, i clearly don’t really know what’s going on, but hopefully the professor will clue me in and i’ll at least have some idea of what he said by the end of it. plus just writing your notes in a fun casual way is going to make reading back over them SO much more enjoyable and memorable! (there’s science to back this up but i gotta finish this work so no time to fact check myself now just trust me)

alright, advice over. good luck with school dudes!

[OH Also, if you write a direct quote in your notes– ALWAYS WRITE THE PAGE NUMBER. you’ll need that shit if you use it in a paper.]

2

The Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe is arguably one of the most influential Gothic writers of the last century. He has become a symbol of horror and mystery not only in his work, but also in his death. On October 3rd, 1849, he was found delirious and wandering the streets of Baltimore, Maryland. A witness from the time reported that Mr. Poe was “In great distress and in need of immediate medical assistance” although nobody was quite sure what was wrong with him. He was rushed to hospital where medics worked around the clock to find a solution to the author’s state. After a short stay in hospital, Edgar Allan Poe died at 5 a.m. on the 7th of October.

Many theories surround his mysterious death, although none can be proven. Suicide, murder, the flu, syphilis, even rabies are all likely explanations as to how Poe died. Many newspapers reported that he had died from an “inflammation of the brain” after rumours from hospital staff emerged. One particularly dark theory dating from 1872 suggests that cooping was the cause of Poe’s death, a form of electoral fraud in which citizens were forced to vote for a particular candidate, sometimes leading to violence and even murder. To this day, his death remains unsolved.

4

via the official outsider my ass twitter account:

“It disturbs me how many abled liberals try to call out ableism while still enforcing the stereotypes that it brands disabled people with. The most important example of this is the repeated ‘defense’ of Serge F. Kovaleski against trump… Granted, trump’s mockery of kovaleski is an important example of American ableism, but note how liberals talk about it. For months now I have seen people, tears in their eyes, refer to SFK not by name but as ‘a disabled person/reporter’. They dismiss the event, not as slander but simply as ‘rude’. ‘Low class’, ‘unprofessional’, ‘cruel’. What I have consistently failed to see liberals mention is the true motive behind his statements: making SFK look incompetent, subhuman… What unnerves me, what makes me question how many people really understand PwD, is that in these events no one calls it ‘untrue’. Kovaleski is a lifelong photojournalist whos employed by a major newspaper. frankly a hero for a community who faces unemployment constantly. What trump did in that moment, by and large, is defamation. Yet his opponents never call it what it is. It’s simply ‘sad’. What this communicates is that liberals ‘find it unclean’ [because] it’s TOO representative of their idea of PwD… To these liberals, the true crime of ableism is not character assassination but that you repeated their own assumptions in a mean voice. To witness abled people failing to call out slander and lies against PwD is to see a criminal antagonist get arrested by a crooked cop. disability is not a limit to someone’s understanding of their life. We aren’t the ‘poor dears in the hospital’ we’re trying to talk to you.

Slytherin x Hufflepuff (girl x girl)
  • Slytherin: *reading wizarding news*
  • Hufflepuff: Hey! Hey! *poking Slytherin*
  • Slytherin: Stop that *shoves her hand away*
  • Hufflepuff: Are you not ticklish? Is that a thing? *attempts to poke at Slytherin again*
  • Slytherin: *sets down newspaper, turns and pins down Hufflepuff* I said stop.
  • Hufflepuff: *out of breath* What am I doing? Stop what?
  • Slytherin: Being.. *studies her face* being cute
  • Hufflepuff: Wow
  • Slytherin: *still holding down Hufflepuff* What is it now?
  • Hufflepuff: I just remembered how beautiful you are.
  • Slytherin: UGH I SAID STOP
how to get grade 9s in english

literature

  • how i studied for english lit
  • poetry terms (subject terminology is key)
  • thorough tips
  • what i used to analyse ‘a christmas carol’
  • essay structure
  • analyse your books like your life depends on it 
  • tips, more tips, and more (there’s a thread!)
  • try and spot different literary devices!
  • always challenge yourself when you’re writing an essay, you can ALWAYS improve
  • use a range of evidence! 
  • use subject terminology! (e.g simile, metaphor etc)
  • be specific about the effects on the reader!
  • write a lot of essays! whether it’s under timed conditions or not…do it! honestly i wrote more essays in year 11 than i have in my entire life!
  • know your book inside out! know your characters (maybe make flashcards and mindmaps on them!) know all the themes as well!!
  • re read your books!! it’s a closed book exam so you need know a lot of quotes (use at least 2 quotes per paragraph)
  • following on from the previous point, if you know even one word of a quote use it!!! ok!! cheat the exams!! it’s still evidence 
  • do practice questions (yes it was new spec and no there wasn’t any past papers, so I made them up! but you can also find made up ones online)
  • do not be discouraged by a low mark! see it as an opportunity to improve!! no essay is ever perfect!
  • for real always include context in an essay (e.g societal expectations at the time? etc) !! and use the correct term of the year e.g jacobean era, victorian etc
  • revise for your mocks!! (this is for both language and literature)! it gives you an insight on how you’re doing and makes it easier to revise for the final exams
  • for poetry memorise quotes and honestly write a bunch of comparison essays (or make detailed plans for comparison essays) (i’ve actually made a video on how i studied poems)
  • always mention the writer’s name, it honestly forces you to talk about the intentions of the writer!

language

  • extend your vocabulary 
  • use different sentence lengths (i’m talking about section 2 in both language papers)
  • use different connecting words!! suggest and shows gets boring after the 6th time in a row please
  • practice writing stories and articles!! 
  • practice answering questions in general and get someone to mark them
  • use/ talk about different devices e.g extended metaphors, similes, facts etc
  • know your mark scheme inside out (what does your examiner want from you?)
  • make sure your timing is right!! it’s essential! so practice doing papers under timed conditions!
  • know your mark scheme inside out! find out what they want to see from you!! maybe writer’s intentions?? judicious range of evidence??
  • read books!! write descriptions!! write stories!! paint scenery!! in order to get you in the mood of creative writing
  • when writing formal articles, make sure to use the form of the article e.g when writing a letter use dear/ write an address/ sign off with yours sincerely, similarly when writing an article for a newspaper have a heading/subheading
  • also technical accuracy is crucial! so make sure you check over to see you’ve spelt things right! included commas!! and get fancy (use semi colons, quotation marks etc when you can, but only if you know how to use them!!)
  • also in general don’t forget to rest!!! chill!!! take breaks!! drink some water!! eat some fruits!! get that chocolate!! TREAT YO SELF!!

if anyone has anymore tips feel free to add on!!

AU where instead of making a snap decision and leaving for the Seine, Javert just. keeps returning to Valjean’s house to examine for himself how Valjean can simultaneously be a good person and a criminal. eventually Valjean heads downstairs each morning to find Javert already at the kitchen table, casually reading the newspaper. Javert always greets him with “good morning, I’ll most likely arrest you today”. he never does