how do people color this show

4

FFVII REVISED

Okay, allow me to explain:Recently, it was brought to my attention that some people on my page had a problem with me drawing black people because I, a black man, was drawing far too many of them (and not as stereotypes or tropes) when I’m known for having diverse character designs in the first place. This struck me as odd because there is literally no problem with me drawing characters of other backgrounds any other time, but the moment I start to draw us in a way that doesn’t make us look like the same stereotypes you’re used to seeing, it’s a problem? Check yourself. I literally got asked, “Do you ever draw white people?” And “You only draw black guys. Why?” In the same morning and I’m like, “Oh so this is a PROBLEM now?” Anyone that has seen my work knows that I draw people from all over. That said, there IS a conscious decision to represent my people in a way that is just and equal to how every other race has been represented since like…forever. Don’t come at me for actually taking the time and effort to show us in positive light. If me drawing people of color as characters and not stereotypes and over used tropes offends you, then get ready to hate my black ass then, because I’m not about to sit by and let us not be represented in a respectful, uplifting and positive light anymore and if you don’t like it well…. Too bad. But since it was an issue with me drawing my own heroes of color, I decided to do other heroes and villains from a game I’m fond of and make them people of color…. I specifically chose FFVII because it’s already a diverse case and to Square Enix’s credit, you could literally tell the same story with these designs. Enjoy.

If someone walked up to you and said, “I am planning on killing you, your entire family and a significant number of the people who you know and care about,” how many of you would argue that this falls under “free speech”?

Of course you wouldn’t. You would understand that it is a threat and you would do anything you could to shut that threat down. Maybe you would file a police report, buy a gun, or fight that sonofabitch right there, or maybe you would be too afraid to do anything, but regardless of how you responded you would understand that this person needs to be stopped before he hurts you and your loved ones.

Every word from a neo-Nazi’s mouth is a threat of violence against Jewish people, Roma people and people of color and many others.

Not only is it a threat of violence, it is an active attempt to bring that violence into existence by recruiting others who will aid them in taking this violence to its greatest possible extreme.

Show the same respect for marginalized people’s rights to be protected and to defend themselves from political violence that you would expect to be shown if under threat of interpersonal violence.

risky asks

1. “@” people you want to be friends with

2. screenshot the tabs you have open

3. the last text you sent to someone?

4. do you have a nsfw blog?

5. i dare you to _____ 

6. screenshot the first page of your search history

7. tell an embarrassing memory or story

8. how often do you take showers?

9.  what was your first blog URL?

10. if you draw or write, show some of your really old work

REALLY risky asks (watch out!!! super Risky)

1. if you had to hug anyone who would you hug

2. whats your favorite flavor of ice cream?

3. whats your favorite color?

4. if you have pets, what are their names?

5. do you like a warm bed or a cold bed?

6. whats a really good memory you have?

7. favorite song you cant stop listening to?

8. do you drink water with or without ice in it?

9. do you like to use correct grammar when you type or just type all lowercase?

10. whats something thats made you laugh recently?

Getting to know you Questions for the Mun!
  • 🎂- When's your birthday?
  • 👨‍👩‍👧‍👦- What's your family like?
  • 🐶- Favorite animal?
  • 🔶- Favorite color(s)?
  • 🎥- Favorite movie?
  • 📺- Favorite TV show?
  • 🎞- Favorite cartoon/anime?
  • 🍔- Favorite food?
  • 🍦- Favorite ice cream flavor?
  • 🍭- Favorite candy?
  • 🍸- Do you drink?
  • 👣- What do you like to do in your spare time?
  • ⚽️- Do you like any sports?
  • 🎮- Favorite video game(s)?
  • ⛪️- Are you religious?
  • ⌛️- Last thing you did before logging in?
  • 🎈- Share a childhood memory!
  • 🛍- What was the last purchase you made for?
  • 💸- If you had a billion dollars and could only spend it, what would you buy first?
  • 🖌- Are you artsy?
  • ❤️- How would you describe yourself?
  • 💛- How do other people describe you?
  • ⭕️- Favorite Pokemon?
  • 💠- what is the Most expensive thing you own?
  • ⚜- What is the most precious thing you own?
  • 🐻- Do you have any stuffed animals?
  • 🐝- Favorite season?
  • 🐋- share a Weird/funny story?

anonymous asked:

so i'm (afro) cuban but for whatever reason (melanin) people like to act like they dont believe me when i tell them this so the other day one of my coworkers told me he hates it when i say "pero like" and when i asked him why he said "bc you're not spanish you're just black" & i told him i was cuban and he laughed and said, "this is gonna be like when you told me you're gay, i don't believe either one" -__-

Like do people not know Cuba is in the caribbean and that the caribbean is filled with Black people? Like girlll. This is basic history. Cuba is fucking mixed as hell lmao And even without the knowledge of how people ended up in the caribbean, people have a hard time believing afro-latinx exist because of racism in the media which paints a picture that all Latinx look the same, and whitewashing/colorism which presents itself when spanish novelas only show European looking latinx people. It’s sad. Especially since afro-latinx have contributed so much to latinx culture. I listen to african music and I see where it made its mark on caribbean latinx music like Salsa, Merengue, Reggaeton etc. But people not giving Black people their proper credit, what else is new.

I saw a few people in my recent tags asking HOW and one kind sweet user asking what bears the most money so I’m going to share my success story. I’m tagging @alice-elizabethscott , @xxkalleexx , @drunkenwhaleer , and @seismitoadsbutt,    cause I saw y’all in the notes There were a lot more but they were anons

SO Y’ALL WANNA KNOW HOW TO DO THE THING? LEMME SHOW YOU

You will need a game year, roughly 928 Starfruit seeds, the greenhouse, 6 iridium sprinkers, as many kegs as you can possibly craft, 157 casks, your favorite music, and a LOT of patience.

I’m putting it under a readmore because hot dang it’s a long post. It woudln’t be as long but I wanted to put pictures in 

Keep reading

thatgeekgirlinthenerdcorner  asked:

Don't think that your art isn't perfect. Yeah, as years could go by your art style may change, but that's a different story. Your art is amazing and wonderful to look at. You are a GREAT artist. Not many people could do the things you do. You know how to do full body, and any pose you put your characters in seems to be flawless. And don't get me started on your coloring skills. I will fangirl as I go on about the colors. Point is your art is amazing. You are amazing. So don't be scared to show -

……You make me blush/// ///
I just not always self-confidence,I think this is part of my personality

it is not easy to change,but Thank you for everything!!

Go Go ‘Power Rangers’ (2017 Review)

Is this good? Is this bad? Will my inner-child allow me to judge this appropriately?

“Power Rangers” is a reboot of the classic 1990s action-packed children’s show “Mighty Morphin Power Rangers,” which in turn is based on the Japanese tokusatsu “Super Sentai Series.” It’s directed by Dean Israelite and stars a cast of young actors, as well as Bryan Cranston, Bill Hader and Elizabeth Banks. The film is set in the small, fictional town of Angel Grove, where local high school students Jason Scott, Kimberly Hart and Billy Cranston (Dacre Montgomery, Naomi Scott and RJ Cyler, respectively) are all caught up in detention. Through a series of shenanigans, they come across Trini and Zack (Becky G and Ludi Lin, respectively) as they all discover an ancient, otherworldly construct. It’s there where they meet Zordon (Cranston) and his robot assistant Alpha 5 (voiced by Hader), and attain the responsibility of becoming a powerful team known as the Power Rangers, and to stop the destruction of an ancient, powerful witch known as Rita Repulsa (Banks). 

This is the absolute perfect “what if” movie. The answer to “what if they remade ‘Power Rangers’ for adults” question. This is the film we asked for, albeit cautiously. We really owe it to franchises such as the “Transformers” series, because without them, this film would be seen as an impossible reach.

Being a millennial, I was very much a child when “Power Rangers” had its long television run, and I stayed true through each incarnation, from “Mighty Morphin” to “Lightspeed Rescue,” and considered myself a retired fan after “Dino Thunder” (I was already in middle school at the time). So yes, shameful as it is, I know my shit. As you can see, I want this to be good. But was it?

Yes. Surprisingly, it was pretty good. It’s not shockingly “I thought this was going to be shit but it ended up being amazingly amazing” good. It’s just good.

Here’s one thing that the film does better than the TV show: the acting. In a great departure from the “Saved by the Bell” mood that the 90s actors gave us, we now have grounded, realistic, rebellious teenagers. These new actors fit the “teenagers with attitude” description way better than the 90s actors ever did. You have Montgomery as Jason, playing the rebel who ends up having to deal with the most responsibility. Scott plays Kimberly, the girl who does a good job of not just being the obligatory female casting, or the fighting damsel-in-distress, unlike the original. The dialogue between these two is usually filled with charm, whether its casual banter or a proclamation of their contempt for Angel Grove. 

But they do something different with the rest of the cast, which helps to modernize them. Cyler as Billy provides the humor and keeps the grittiness from ever getting lower and lower. Of the five teenagers, he is the one with the most charisma But he also serves to represent autistic teens everywhere. Yes, unlike the television counterpart, they made the Blue Ranger autistic, which is a pretty bold and commendable step for something based off a children’s property.

To keep the ball rolling, they then make Becky G’s Trini represent lesbians and confused, oppressed teenagers everywhere. Okay, this film had me at shedding light on autism, but encouraging more LGBT representation? Hats off to you, Lionsgate and Saban. Despite this, I found Becky G’s performance to be slightly annoying until about halfway through the movie, when they developed her much more, and gave her a more integral role in the plot. 

While I praised the rest of the cast, I’d have to drop the axe on Ludi Lin as Zack, the Black Ranger.  Compared to all these convincing performances, Lin’s is absolutely haphazard. The way he is introduced is to set up how much of a cocky outsider he is, so naturally he’s by himself. He then starts speaking to himself, which is one of my absolute biggest pet peeves in a movie. I despise movie moments where normal-functioning people start speaking or quipping to themselves, the only sensible reason being that the writers assume the audience is too dumb to know what the character is thinking. I get it if a character has schizophrenia or another mental illness, or if the words are limited to comedic inner-banter, but not in this case. He’s someone with decent social-competence and no reason to quarrel with himself, other than provide exposition to the audience.

But like Trini, I did find him to be much less annoying when he opened up. They gave him a pretty touching backstory with his own troubles, and they make his motivations really apparent. And just to keep the ball rolling, he’s also the most foreign one of the group, being bilingual, unlike the original black ranger. Now that I think about it, many of the Power Ranger series’ casts don’t feature any overtly foreign characters, apart from maybe of an alien race. 

That is precisely why this casting works. Whether or not you find these characters annoying, you can’t doubt that they’re there for a good reason, and you might even warm up to them as the movie progresses. They also help to introduce bouts of political correctness, but they aren’t preachy or condescending about it (which is really the only good way to go about political correctness). They represent people of various colors, mental states and social capabilities, showing (but not telling) that everyone is capable of extraordinary things as long as they have camaraderie.

I can’t say much about Cranston as Zordon. It’s a great homage, seeing as how Cranston has actually been a part of “Power Rangers” since the original television show, where he voiced many of the villains they face. I do love his voice-work here, and while it took some getting used to, I ended up really liking how they presented him. Rather than a chubby, floating head in a tube, they made him manifest into a wall, kind of like one of those pinpression toys. Not to mention they could have easily made him a one-dimensional character. But they went above and beyond to give him his own arc, his own set of feelings and doubts, and a world of lore behind him.

If you thought Alpha 5 was annoying in the television show, then you can rest your worries because Bill Hader fixed him up good. The original’s voice was so high-pitched and screechy; basically in typical 90s fashion (or how the 90s thought Aliens would sound like). This time, he just kind of does the same thing he did as Fear from “Inside Out,” except less screaming. His design had me slightly worried but I got used to it.

Now, Elizabeth Banks as Rita Repulsa has me split down the middle. On the one hand, I do like that at least ONE person in this entire film is trying to recall the absurdity and campiness of the original series. At the same time, I found her to be over-the-top, and incredibly outlandish compared to the rest of the grounded cast. She is guilty of overacting here, which is both a blessing and a curse. The prosthetics on her are amazing though, from both start to finish. She starts out as an outright horror character, which is something I didn’t expect to see even in the gritty version of a children’s property. 

If you kept up with me for this long, you know that a recurring theme here is that this film takes several risks that are rather uncharacteristic of a children’s property. Sure, there are hints of silliness to try and match the youthful appeal of the original, but they also throw in more mature bits of humor, about things such as drug tests and jacking off a cow (no joke). Me personally, I welcome these jokes. If anything, this is much more of a film for the adults who grew up watching “Power Rangers,” rather than children. The maturity really shines through in the form of character development and chemistry.

I must say that if you are bringing a child to watch this, keep in mind there will be mild swearing, and several mature jokes.

A common criticism (ad nauseam, pretty much) is that this film is a forced collision between two different movies. Two thirds of the movie is essentially the origin story, which focuses mainly on character development. At the same time, this is the section that appeals to the audience the most, whether you’re fans of the original or not. No one comes into anything titled “Power Rangers” and expects to feel for the characters. But through one particular scene where all the characters develop a kinship, we develop a peculiar attachment to each of them. It was at this moment that I’m glad these people are the ones I’m spending five more movies with (Yup, that’s right).

But when it sticks to the original, it definitely sticks, and that’s where the last third of the movie comes in. If you’re looking for cool looking suits fighting monsters with martial arts and gymnastics, you will get it. If you’re looking for giant robot dinosaurs battling another giant monster, you will get it. And MOST OF ALL, if you want to, at least once, hear the iconic theme song, you will get it. In all it’s pure, epic goodness.

But this is where I have to defend my appreciation for this movie, because many people will come in accusing me of being “blinded by nostalgia.” Despite having these borrowed features from the original show, there is really nothing nostalgic about it. The action here is far better than most of the show’s episodes. There is no silliness to be had apart from what would be silly by realistic standards (as opposed to having two obligatory bully characters).

Even some elements taken from the show are vastly different. Case in point: Rita, who in this film is actually getting shit done by herself rather than sitting up in some moon tower yelling at everyone.

Even the formula of the show is broken up here. Back then, everything was so fast-paced to where every time a new series was brought in, the new team of Power Rangers would unrealistically form intimate familial connection and extraordinary abilities within 20 minutes. This film actually shows you that the Power Rangers had to train for this, both physically and mentally. They didn’t just have these abilities bestowed upon them as a result of the plot rushing it together. You see them work for it, which is something I really appreciated about it.

I had to bring that up because many of the people who didn’t like this film will be quick to see reactions like mine and guilt me for “nostalgia.” But that “tone difference” that they’re faulting this for is the reason why you can’t pin nostalgia on this. All that means is that everything I liked about this film has been on its own merits, maybe (at most) perpetuated by quick little homages to the original. 

I suppose before I wrap this up I should mention one more thing. Not really a problem, but more like something I wish happened: I wish they played the theme song more. It was wonderful hearing the iconic theme song, perfectly borrowed from the 1995 film, and at the height of its “Power Ranger-ness.” But I felt that if they really were gonna throw it in there, they should have totally owned it and at least left it playing for a bit longer. If not that, then at least make an instrumental cover to play in the background during the climax, rather than GODDAMN KANYE.

This is a film that has fans and critics alike split down the middle, but it’s pretty clear that everyone who hates it is hating it for the same two reasons: (1) It has a massive tone-clash towards the end, and (2) It caters way too much toward product promotion for Krispy Kreme donuts. I do agree with the latter, make no mistake. But when I hear people complain about this tone-clash, it reminds me of people who complained about the “slow parts” of every other superhero film, whether it’s “Captain America: Civil War,” or “Batman v Superman.” Apart from being a “Power Rangers” movie, this is also an origin story film. And for something as ridiculous as “Power Rangers,” it definitely requires a slow initiation process. To get us going on a six-movie deal, the creators will have to help casual viewers acclimate to the premise, because chances are the naysayers are the ones who skipped out on this franchise as children, and therefore missed their window of opportunity. Ironic how a movie based on a children’s property requires a mature level of patience from the audience.

As I said before, if you came into this wanting to see colored suits, martial arts, explosions and giant robots, you will get it. If you’re dragged into this film but appreciate elements like character development and chemistry, you will get that too. As someone who enjoys both, I actually would go so far as to say I loved this movie. I don’t care if I’m alone on this, but I can comfortably say that I loved the “Power Rangers” movie.

this isnt really a ‘bts’ submission and idkduwahdoah (my art is uglie sorry i made it in mspaint)

but your art is amazing and soft and i wanna hug it everyday !!

do you have drawing tips for

1. drawing the members (all mine look the same)

2. color palettes

3. drawing in general please help i must draw soft

OK so I’ll try to help you even if I am not that good!

1. I think the best way to draw the members (if its not a realistic style ofc) is to take physical characteristics and personality traits and to mix it. It can be really anything! Something that you like about their apprearance/personality. 

An example: For Jungkook I wanted him to look really innocent but also really funny. And irl Jungkook has really big eyes and lil bunny teeth so I mixed it and thats how I created Jungkook’s chara design! (big ass eyes, later I added the galaxy, then I removed the nose etc). The more you draw them the more you will add/remove things!

2. If by color palette you mean skin tone/ hair color it’s up to you! It’s almost impossible to get the right skin tone so don’t worry about this too much it won’t be perfect. You can just look pics of the members and see who has a darkest skin, a more peachy skin etc… I prefer to not whitewash them. I think that currently the YNWA live is the best way to see their skin tone w/ whitewash! Tbh I change my color palette pretty often. For the hair I don’t really mind, I just pick a random color who looks similar!

3. I KNOOOOW that people hate this answer but PRACTICE IS KEY. 

That’s the only thing that you can do, draw everyday or every two days but PRACTICE!!! 

And I’ll show you. Since I have this blog I almost draw everyday. Look how much I improved in a few months

7 months ago vs now

5 months ago vs now 

SO YEAH KEEP DRAWING♥♥♥

Iron Fist Isn’t Bad. People are just Racist.

I watched it and based on the media I was expecting it to be somewhat disappointing. However, I loved it. I loved it more than I did Daredevil. I thought the plot was fun and Finn Jones is a GIFT. How dare you racist (and yes I do mean racist) people attack the show and lie about it because Danny Rand is white. It does not deserve the hate it is getting. Racism is defined as discrimination based on someone’s skin color and I have seen nothing but hate for Finn Jones based on nothing but being a white guy who is playing a character from a comic book released in the 70s and in case you guys didn’t know, Danny Rand in the comic books is white. If we changed Luke Cage to be white that would be the exact same thing and I would be just as pissed if not more so. Danny being white allows for a very special dynamic between him and Luke Cage.

When you write hateful things about Iron Fist because they didn’t hire an actor that has an Asian background,  it isn’t progressive; you are putting distances between cultures again by covering up that history between Danny and Luke and what that relationship stood for.

Iron Fist and Power Man were written as a way to bridge the gaps between two cultures during a time where that relationship was considered a little more taboo. They are best friends (Luke actually names his daughter “Dany” after him) and race didn’t matter to them. Luke didn’t care that Danny was white and that meant something at that time. This relationship means more with Danny being white because it helped overcome a great deal of racial disagreements; it showed a black man and a white man could have that relationship that was entirely accepting and respectful of both cultures despite those cultures having a history of bad feelings.

 I’m not saying I don’t want other cultures to be represented; of course I do, I’m just saying I like that Marvel honors the comic book origins especially when it has that unique history. My message here is; don’t hate Iron Fist because he’s white. Watch the series and if you hate it that’s fine but actually look at the series and not just the skin color. 

  • what she says: i'm fine
  • what she really means: can you believe lana maria parrilla, a woman of color, single handedly carried an entire show called once upon a time and yet people are saying she ruined the show and that she deserves to be let go just how fucking stupid can you be to not realize that if it weren't for this woman the show wouldn't have even lasted long enough for you to have your hetero ships be more ungrateful i fucking dare you. lana parrilla deserves to let go of ouat because that show is wasting her exceptional talents and not the other way around also do not ever fucking insult lana parrilla in front of me, beside me, or behind my back or i will hunt you down for the rest of your miserable pathetic homophobic life
Gif Coloring Tutorial

So, I got asked by a few people how to color our gifs, and specially hard scenes, such as yellow scenes from Suicide Squad, they can be a pain to color, so here I’m gonna show how to do this kind of coloring:

Basically you’ll need

  • Knowledge on how to make gifs
  • Any version of Photoshop (mine is cs5)

Please note that this a very detailed tutorial so that everyone can do it, including screenshots, so everything is under the cut.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Hey, I was wondering if you wouldn't mind talking abt how you do your colouring atm?

Hi anon ^^

To be honest, I’ve been working with the same technique for years. Basically, I sketch, block the colors, work on a first series of details, do some color adjustments, add shadows, add highlights, add more details, rework the skin texture and…voilà roughly!

In order to show you my coloring process, I did what people have been asking me to do for a long long time, I took screen shots of my work as I was working (see gif below). As you can see, there are a lot of comes and goes, “yes…but no…but yes…but shit…that was better before”. Sometimes I’m not satisfied so I change a whole part of the drawing, like for instance the color of the sheets (from white to blue) or Bucky’s right hand (the first one was awful). I also use the “Liquify” and the “free transform” tools to fix things I’m not satisfied with (here: the eyes that were not centered properly). However, don’t get me wrong, I know where I’m going when it comes to colors, compositions, textures, etc…What I change are just minor adjustments. I also work on the hair at the end because for me, it’s the cherry at the top of the Sunday. When I can leave it as the last step, I do it. You see, for instance here, I used as a reference a picture of Sebastian Stan with short hair. I just drew the basic shape of the hair in black and drew the long hair and all the details when the art was almost done. (I started to draw long strands at the beginning, but finally no, I stepped back)

When it comes to the palette itself, sometimes I keep a palette close to the reference picture because I find it interesting or beautiful, sometimes I create my own palette and go wild when it comes to colors but at a moment or a another, I do some color adjustments. Choosing my palette comes rather naturally, it’s a question of habits too but I never strick to a restricted palette. I love it when it’s flamboyant and shinny. :)

Tools of the trade: Photoshop CS6. I use the Photoshop Default set and also the Mar-Ka brush set. Here is a gif that includes all the steps of a color artwork I did for this tut:

Voilà! I hope that now my way of coloring an artwork is less obscure. Thanks a lot anon ♥

So tired of some of these reviewers who think it would be cool if Clarke takes the flame so she can always have Lxa with her. And then in the next breath they wonder if Bellamy and Clarke will become romantically canon this season. First of all, I don’t believe Clarke will take the flame but do these reviewers not see how problematic it would be for Clarke to take the flame? IT IS NOT CLARKE’S TO TAKE. It is not hers to suddenly use to become the great divine leader of the grounders, who’s culture she is not born into. It isn’t even a choice Clarke should be in a position to make AT ALL. Clarke is not born to be “the true leader”, the only person capable of saving “savage” grounders from themselves. It’s like Octagon telling grounders about their own culture! Stop white saviors 2017! Then they go and say it would be good to see Clarke carry Lxa (in the flame) with her forever even if she moves on… with Bellamy. I’m.. I-. Wow. Yes, please do have the white girl become the leader of a people and culture she was never born into, to teach them, to save them from themselves, to show them the way of life and also please do make sure her future lover, a man of color, shares said girl with her dead former lover. How do you even look at this story and go “that would be so cool”? There’s nothing cool about Clarke becoming the commander. There’s nothing cool about Bellamy having to sit by the sidelines and share Clarke’s love with a dead person. There’s nothing cool about putting Clarke in the position of becoming a character like that. It just annoys me that people don’t seem to see any issues with this. This doesn’t mean it will happen or that speculations from reviewers are true, I still hope it won’t happen and that the writers don’t go there but the very fact that a lot of people seem to be OK with it if it does just baffles me.

8

The Expanse Season 1

“Either you commit to diversity, and it’s just a fact of how you do business, how you live, or you’re not diverse,” Franck says. “You can’t say ‘I know, we’ll be diverse, we’ll gift one black part.’ That sort of tokenism is not diversity. To be truly diverse, you have to start at the top. Our production company, one of the presidents is a black man. The president of our TV division is a woman. Our writer’s room is pretty close to fifty-fifty, men and women. It’s not like there were checkboxes, the attitude was just, ‘Let’s hire an interesting array of voices.’” That attitude extends to the script and the screen. “We’re not trying to champion anyone in particular,” Abraham says. “We’re telling a story, and in the course of the story, there are people who aren’t all white guys. What’s important is what the Zuni woman is doing, not that she’s a Zuni.”
- How SyFy’s The Expanse cast its multiracial future.

I’ve been grappling with how to challenge cynicism in a moment that requires all of us to show up differently.

On Saturday, I joined more than a million women in Washington, D.C., to register my opposition to the new regime. Participating in the Women’s March — if you count satellite protests around the country, the largest one-day mobilization in the history of the United States — was both symbolic and challenging.

Like many other black women, I was conflicted about participating. That a group of white women had drawn clear inspiration from the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, yet failed to acknowledge the historical precedent, rubbed me the wrong way. Here they go again, I thought, adopting the work of black people while erasing us.

I’d had enough before it even began. 53% of white women who voted in the 2016 presidential election did so for a man who aims to move society backward. Were white women now having buyer’s remorse? Where were all of these white people while our people are being killed in the streets, jobless, homeless, over incarcerated, under educated? Are you committed to freedom for everyone, or just yourselves?

For weeks, I sat on the sidelines. I saw debates on list-serves about whether or not to attend the march, the shade on social media directed at the “white women’s march.” Unconvinced that white women would ever fight for the rights of all of us, many decided to sit the march out.

Yet as time went on and the reality of the incoming Donald Trump administration sank in, something began to gnaw at me. Do I believe that a mass movement is necessary to transform power in this country? Do I believe that this mass movement must be multi-racial and multi-class? Do I believe that to build that mass movement, organizing beyond the choir is necessary? If I believe all of these things, how do we get there and what’s my role in making it happen?

I decided to challenge myself to be a part of something that isn’t perfect, that doesn’t articulate my values the way that I do and still show up, clear in my commitment, open and vulnerable to people who are new in their activism. I can be critical of white women and, at the same time, seek out and join with women, white and of color, who are awakening to the fact that all lives do not, in fact, matter, without compromising my dignity, my safety and radical politics.

In the end, I joined an estimated 1 million people who participated in the Washington, D.C. march and the estimated 3 million who marched around the world. I have participated in hundreds of demonstrations, but this was one of the first times where I didn’t know or know of most of the people there.

Sandwiched between other protesters like a sardine in a can, I spoke with demonstrators in the crowd who said this was their first time participating in a mass mobilization. I saw people for whom this wasn’t their first time at a demonstration, but who thought that the days of protesting for our rights was over. I asked them what brought them there. They said they wanted to stand up for all of us. They realized that they, too, were under attack. They wanted to live in a world where everyone was valued, safe and taken care of. They were in awe of just how many people were there, just like them, to oppose the values of President Donald Trump’s administration. They wanted to do something besides feel hopeless.

That evening, I participated in a town hall meeting that drew more than 700 people and had more than 1,100 on the waiting list. Those gathered were mostly white, though there were also people of color present. About half the room said that the Women’s March was the first time they’d participated in a mass mobilization. They were willing to learn about how change happens and how they could be involved. And that was just the beginning.

Checking my social media feed that evening, I read comment after comment dismissing the march — an experience that was transformative for hundreds of thousands of people. I wondered what would have happened if, instead of inviting people in, I’d told people to fuck off and go home. Would they come back? Did it matter if they didn’t?

Anger has an important place in transforming our political consciousness, and should be valued as such. The white lady with the pink, knitted “pussy” hat that came to the march was angry as hell when her future president talked about grabbing women by the pussy. Though she may have been sitting on the sidelines up until now, she decided that she was going to do something about it. Anger at the way America depends on immigrant labor yet forces undocumented immigrants to live in the shadows may lead them to join the movement. Black Americans mad as hell about the ways that this country strips us of our humanity might join the movement, even though they didn’t before.

I agree with Solange when she says, “I got a lot to be mad about, and I have a right to be mad.” But that anger is not enough. It is insufficient to build or take power. Anger will not change the fact that Republicans have taken control of all three branches of government and control both chambers of the legislature in 32 states. Anger will not stop vigilantes from terrorizing our communities, and anger will not change an economy that deems too many of us as disposable.

More than a moral question, it is a practical one. Can we build a movement of millions with the people who may not grasp our black, queer, feminist, intersectional, anti-capitalist, anti-imperialist ideology but know that we deserve a better life and who are willing to fight for it and win?

If there was ever a time to activate our organizer super powers, this is it. I’m not going to argue that black people or other people of color need to stop holding white people accountable. White people are not going anywhere, but neither are we if we don’t start to think and do differently.

Hundreds of thousands of people are trying to figure out what it means to join a movement. If we demonstrate that to be a part of a movement, you must believe that people cannot change, that transformation is not possible, that it’s more important to be right than to be connected and interdependent, we will not win.

If our movement is not serious about building power, then we are just engaged in a futile exercise of who can be the most radical.

This is a moment for all of us to remember who we were when we stepped into the movement — to remember the organizers who were patient with us, who disagreed with us and yet stayed connected, who smiled knowingly when our self-righteousness consumed us.

I remember who I was before I gave my life to the movement. Someone was patient with me. Someone saw that I had something to contribute. Someone stuck with me. Someone did the work to increase my commitment. Someone taught me how to be accountable. Someone opened my eyes to the root causes of the problems we face. Someone pushed me to call forward my vision for the future. Someone trained me to bring other people who are looking for a movement into one.

No one is safe from the transition this country is undergoing. While many of us have faced hate, ignorance and greed in our daily lives, the period that we have entered is unlike anything that any of us has ever seen before.

We can build a movement in the millions, across difference. We will need to build a movement across divides of class, race, gender, age, documentation, religion and disability. Building a movement requires reaching out beyond the people who agree with you. Simply said, we need each other, and we need leadership and strategy.

We can tell people a hundred times over that because they haven’t been here, they have no right to be here now. But I promise that the only place that will get us is nowhere.

— Alicia Garza, co-founder of #BlackLivesMatter. Our cynicism will not build a movement. Collaboration will.

follow @the-movemnt

Girlfriend Tag Questions - Lesbian Edition

Here are some questions to answer when filming a girlfriend tag video with you and your girlfriend (or fiancée, wife). Have fun!

1. When and where did you meet?
2. What did you first notice about each other?
3. Who first asked the other out?
4. Where was your first date?
5. Who said “I love you” first?
6. How did your first kiss happen? Who initiated it?
7. When is your anniversary?
8. When is your girlfriend’s birthday? Who is older?
9. When did you meet each other’s parents and what was that like?
10. What is a typical date night like for you and your girlfriend?
11. What made you realize you were in love with her?
12. Choose one word to describe your girlfriend. Why that word?
13. Were you friends before you became lovers?
14. Have either of you dated a girl before getting with your girlfriend?
15. Have you ever been mistaken for sisters?
16. Do you get more support or hate from others towards your relationship?
17. Have you faced any difficulties or prejudice because you are a same sex couple?
18. Do you do any PDA?
19. Does your girlfriend have any pets?
20. How do you usually spend your time together?
21. What is one thing your girlfriend does that you don’t like?
22. What is your girlfriend’s favorite food? Least favorite food?
23. How many people are in your girlfriend’s family?
24. What is your girlfriend’s favorite musical artist?
25. Do you have a couple song?
26. Do you have a couple name (i.e. Brangelina)?
27. What side of the bed do you sleep on?
28. Who is the better driver?
29. Who is the better cook?
30. Who is the better singer?
31. Who is the better dancer?
32. Can your girlfriend play any musical instruments?
33. What is your girlfriend’s favorite TV show?
34. What is your girlfriend’s favorite movie?
35. What do you and your girlfriend fight about the most?
36. How do you two get over a fight?
37. Who is your girlfriend’s #1 celebrity crush?
38. Does your girlfriend like and/or play any sports? If so, which ones?
39. What sports team(s) does your girlfriend root for?
40. What nationality(s) is your girlfriend?
41. What is your girlfriend’s eye color?
42. What is one thing about your girlfriend most people don’t know?
43. What are your pet names for each other?
44. What is the #1 item on your girlfriend’s bucket list?
45. Does your girlfriend have any quirky habits?
46. What is your girlfriend’s favorite animal?
47. Who squashes the bugs?
48. What is your girlfriend’s favorite color?
49. Who spends more when shopping?
50. Pass on one piece of relationship advice.

anonymous asked:

Do you know how to color skin tones? I'm going to start coloring my art but I've been scared to do anyone who's nonwhite because I'm not sure what appropriate skin tone is what

ah, not sure if I’m good at it, and I suck at explaining how I do things, but I can show u my color palette for skin tones

and here are some examples of how I use that palette of colors for various characters :0 hope it helps