I end up reading a lot of home living magazines while waiting in doctor’s offices and such, and based on the articles contained therein, I’ve come to the conclusion that there’s a chunk of the population for whom financial planning is basically performance art - and I don’t think they actually realise it.

Like, just today I spotted an article about a case study in creating affordable home-building solutions by assembling houses out of old shipping containers. I’m figuring, all right, sort of a low-income housing initiative, right?

What I actually ended up reading was a rambling story that starts with the owner borrowing fifty thousand dollars from her parents to pay for materials and permits, off-handedly mentions getting her architect stepfather to draw up the plans for her, continues with her three brothers - all of them experienced builders due to overseeing their own hobby renovation projects - taking a week off work to help her put the place together, and caps off with a funny anecdote about how come the first winter, all the plumbing froze, so she had to go live with her mom for a few months anyway.

Basically, she used her family connections to score an interest-free five-figure loan, access to rare expertise, and hundreds of hours of free skilled labour, and plowed it all into a cramped, ugly playhouse that’s only livable for part of the year.

The unfathomable part is, based on how how the article framed the whole thing, it’s clear that both the subject and the author honestly believe that they’ve discovered some sort of amazing money-saving life hack. They’re seriously convinced that this is the magic-bullet solution to the country’s affordable housing shortage, and not an expensive and impractical vanity project that ultimately failed to produce a house people can actually live in.

Just blows my mind. And this is the segment of the population that basically all of our politicians and business leaders are drawn from!

npr.org
When Residents Take Ownership, A Mobile Home Community Thrives
A neighborhood in Minnesota is proving that there's a potential solution to run-down mobile home parks: The residents banded together democratically and purchased their community.

Typically, the companies that own mobile home parks also own the infrastructure, and the less money they spend maintaining it, the more profit they can make. Housing specialists say that’s one of the main reasons why many manufactured home parks look worn down and scruffy — like Park Plaza did before they formed a co-op.

Many people love to blame the bad conditions in most trailer parks on some sort of pathology of the residents, but if you give the residents control and more power over their homes and cut out more landlords, things dramatically improve.

  • me: provide education, housing, food, and water for all, we have abundance of every one of these things
  • them: but what about money
  • me: MONEY ISNT REAL YOU FUCK.
  • them: but who will pay for it
  • me: We literally don't need to use that archaic system to distribute goods anymore, we're so efficient as a society we can fucking grow up and stop pretending we're those children who can't share
  • me: who were taught by adults in the first place not to share.

Hillary Clinton: “In fact, Donald was one of the people who rooted for the housing crisis. He said back in 2006, ‘Gee, I hope it does collapse cause then I can go in and makes some money.’ Well it did collapse.”

Donald Trump: “That’s called ‘business,’ by the way.

Hillary Clinton: “Nine million people lost their jobs. Five million people lost their homes. Thirteen trillion dollars in family wealth was wiped out.”

youtube

Jazz vocalist John Boutté feels he can no longer afford to live in his hometown of New Orleans. He’s not alone. Rising housing costs are pushing many musicians and service workers — the backbone of New Orleans’ tourism economy — further and further outside the city limits. This suburbanization of the working class poses more than an inconvenience: It’s fraying the culture of New Orleans and splintering the very neighborhoods that have nurtured the city’s music for decades.

Down Home In Treme With John Boutté And Shannon Powell