house-of-lords

fatimagic  asked:

why doesn’t theon carry the title of lord? i’m assuming it’s because he was a ward of the starks and therefore couldn’t inherit anything iron islands-related, but a) he’s not in their custody anymore, and b) sandor clegane is now technically the rightful heir to his house since he’s not in a king’s service. is this just a problem within show?

Theon isn’t called a lord because Theon isn’t a lord. The title “Lord” in ASOIAF is given only to the head of a lordly house. (As opposed to “m’lord”, which is used by smallfolk towards any male who looks noble, or “my lord”, which is used by courteous people for any male that looks noble but not knightly.) There are a few exceptions, such as kings (ex: “Lord of the Seven Kingdoms”) and honorary lordships (ex: Lord Varys), but in general heirs of houses and their brothers are not lords, only their fathers. And if they’re not knights (from youth or lack of ability/desire), these sons don’t have any title at all, which is confusing, thanks GRRM. (Especially since noble women and girls are all titled Lady, whether ruling ladies or daughters of the head of house or married to the head of house, even if their husband is a Ser. Except when they’re princesses. GRRM has very few titles in Westeros.)

Regarding Theon, (a) he is not the current head of House Greyjoy – that would be Euron; and (b) at the time Theon’s father Balon died, he had declared himself King of the Iron Islands, and thus Theon was a Prince. (Which would make Asha a princess, lol.) Even though captive, Theon is still a prince, in the eyes of many, including himself and Ramsay (albeit in a mocking way, “I send you each a piece of prince” for example). If Asha manages to use him to depose Euron (or if Euron dies otherwise and Theon succeeds him), Theon would be titled King, of course. For as long as he can keep it; that is, if House Greyjoy stops being kings of the Iron Islands (a Targaryen ruler would insist, most firmly), then he would be Lord Theon of House Greyjoy. Unless it’s Asha who’s somehow ruling Lady Greyjoy. (But she’d probably use Theon as a figurehead, given her experience at the kingsmoot.) We’ll have to see. But right now Theon’s either a prince, or nothing at all.

As for Sandor, House Clegane is not a lordly house, they’re landed knights, for whom the ruling title is “Ser”, not “Lord”. Since Sandor is not a knight, his title is… complicated. Not being in a king’s service has nothing to do with it (being a Kingsguard would be), there can be plenty of lords working for the king – however, Sandor is an outlaw and can’t claim his lands, which makes it more complicated. (Gregor being only mostly dead makes it even more complicated.) But if Sandor could claim his rights as the head of House Clegane, most likely he’d be Master, not Lord, and not Ser. See here for more.

Hope that helps!

13 reasons why playlist

I made a playlist for a few characters from 13 reasons why. Not all of them have 13 tracks, but I tried my best lol. Feel free to add on / edit, but give credit :))

Hannah:
Better than me - The brobecks
All of the drugs - The brobecks
Make me wanna die - the pretty reckless
The cold - exitmusic
Time to say goodbye - twenty one pilots
Breathe me - Sia
When the story ends (piano) - the fray
Nothing - the script
Unsteady - X Ambassadors
Goner - Twenty one pilots
You found me - The fray
I gave you all - Mumford and sons
Empty - the click five

Clay:
Get on the road - tired pony
Always on my mind - Elvis
If I could fly - one direction
Love you all along - La strada
All I want - kodaline
Turning page - sleeping at last
Angel - theory of a dead man
Johnny boy - twenty one pilots
I found - amber run
Talking to the moon - Bruno Mars
Six feet under - Billie Eilish
Hurts like hell - Fleurie
Terrible love - birdy

Jessica:
She’s so mean - matchbox twenty
Primadonna girl - marina and the diamonds
When you were young - the killers
You’re such a - Hailee Steinfeld
All the boys- panic! at the disco
Down - Jason walker
You don’t own me - Grace ft. G-eazy
When you’re gone - Avril Lavigne
Never say never - the fray
Photograph - ed Sheeran
Oceans - Seafret
Total eclipse of the heart - sleeping at last
Lovesick fool - the cab

Justin:
My life - billy joel
Gotta get away - the black keys
How could I have known - Keaton Henson
Six degrees of separation - the script
Not over you - Gavin DeGraw
If you’re gone - matchbox twenty
Breaking inside - shinedown
Jet black heart - 5 seconds of summer
Heartless - the fray
Look after you - the fray
Screen - twenty one pilots
Blue - troye sivan ft. Alex hope
Call me - shinedown

Alex:
Broken - Lund
Golden - fall out boy
Teenage dirt bag - Wheatus
What a catch, donnie - fall out boy
How’s it gonna be - third eye blind
Yellow - coldplay
Truce - twenty one pilots
Not about angels - birdy
This is gospel (piano) - panic! At the disco
Drown - bring me the horizon
Better than me - hinder
21 guns - Green day
The funeral - band of horses  

Tony:
Bulletproof heart - my chemical romance
Dirty little secret - the all American rejects
Take care - Beach house
Don’t dream it’s over - crowded house
Ends of the earth - lord Huron
The scientist - coldplay
Lullaby - nickelback
Build a home - the cinematic orchestra
Mercury - sleeping at last
How to save a life - the fray
Rewind - Paolo Nutini
Fake your death - my chemical romance
Heroes - David Bowie

Skye:
Same mistake - James Blunt
Don’t like you anymore - the brobecks
Ghosts that we knew - Mumford and sons
Sleeping pills - the brobecks
I’m not okay - my chemical romance
Taken by sleep - Tyler joseph
Cut the cord - shinedown
Semiautomatic - twenty one pilots

Tyler:
Mr. Brightside - the killers
Bully - shinedown
Gives you hell - the all American rejects
I will follow you - Tolouse
Reject - shinedown
Teenagers - my chemical romance

Jeff:
Saturn - sleeping at last
If I die young - the band perry
Far too young to die - panic! at the disco
Losing your memory - ryan star
Far away - nickelback

Courtney:
Kissed a girl - katy perry
Secret love song - little mix
You’ve got to hide your love - Brian Epstein

we think of sondheim as the musical theatre writer for the bourgeoisie and alw as writing the musicals for the people but consider: alw is way richer than sondheim, is a member of the house of lords, and when trump was asked his favorite musicals, he specifically named evita and phantom…

Chart Ruler & Life Purpose

Your life purpose is to [Ascendant/chart ruler] [house].

Examples:
Sagittarius Ascendant, Jupiter in 4th - your life purpose is to expand internally.
Taurus Ascendant, Venus in 8th - your life purpose is to accumulate secretly.
Cancer Ascendant, Moon in 11th - your life purpose is to nurture socially.

Leo Ascendant (sun): exist, shine, radiate, proceed, become, create
Cancer Ascendant: (moon): feel, shift, evoke, sense, nurture, understand
Gemini/Virgo Ascendant (Mercury): think, understand, reason, learn, teach
Taurus/Libra Ascendant (Venus): share, accumulate, negotiate, beautify, love
Aries Ascendant (Mars): initiate, challenge, conquer, survive, accomplish
Sagittarius Ascendant (Jupiter): mentor, experience, expand, inspire, discover
Capricorn Ascendant (Saturn): endure, earn, mature, evolve, strengthen
Aquarius Ascendant (Uranus): change, innovate, progress, rebel, defy
Pisces Ascendant (Neptune): transcend, absorb, enlighten, subsume, illude
Scorpio Ascendant (Pluto): transform, empower, destroy, control, recreate

Chart ruler in 1st: openly, directly, independently, fully, actively
Chart ruler in 2nd: securely, materially, satisfyingly, increasingly, selfishly
Chart ruler in 3rd: communicably, mentally, mutually, inclusively, resourcefully
Chart ruler in 4th: internally, psychologically, comfortably, familiarly, emotionally
Chart ruler in 5th: creatively, individually, personally, romantically, playfully
Chart ruler in 6th: routinely, collaboratively, dutifully, healthily, cleanly
Chart ruler in 7th: interpersonally, receptively, closely, committedly, admittedly
Chart ruler in 8th: secretly, controversially, intimately, radically, transformatively
Chart ruler in 9th: adventurously, fearlessly, philosophically, freely, wildly
Chart ruler in 10th: publicly, successfully, recognizably, powerfully, boldly
Chart ruler in 11th: experimentally, inventively, uniquely, socially, communally
Chart ruler in 12th: spiritually, unconsciously, intrinsically, painfully, karmically

*Supplementary to the chart ruler & in the same sense, you can also look at the ruling planet of the sign / house your North Node is in.

My 2016 In Reading

THE BOOKS I LOVED SO MUCH I WANTED TO SEW THEM INTO MY SKIN AKA MY FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi
Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson
Today I Am a Book by xTx
The Three Woes by Casey Hannan
A Bestiary by Lily Hoang
Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee
The Mothers by Brit Bennett
Commonwealth by Ann Patchett
The Red Car by Marcy Dermansky

THE BOOK THAT OPENED MY EYES AND MIND AND BROKE MY HEART WITH THE PAINFUL REALITY TOO MANY AMERICANS LIVE WITH

Evicted by Matthew Desmond

THE BOOK THAT WAS TOTAL TRASH AND I THINK THE WRITER HATES FAT PEOPLE WHICH IS FINE BECAUSE WE ALL HAVE OUR ISSUES BUT STILL, GIRL, WHAT….

Maestra by L.S. Hilton

THE COMING OF AGE PROSE POETRY THAT MOVED ME IMMEASURABLY

The Pocket Knife Bible by Anis Mojgani

THE BOOK THAT MADE ME THINK HILLARY CLINTON REALLY WAS GOING TO WIN THE PRESIDENCY

All the Single Ladies by Rebecca Traister

THE STRANGE BOOK ABOUT LONELINESS AND THE THINGS WE DO ONLINE THAT I HIGHLY RECOMMEND

Valletta78 by Erin Fitzgerald

THE POETRY BOOK I DIDN’T UNDERSTAND AT ALL THOUGH I COULD TELL THE POEMS WERE SUPER SMART

The House of Lords and Commons by Ishion Hutchinson

THE ACTION THRILLER THAT HAD LOTS OF HYPE BLURBS BUT WAS ONLY SO SO

The Second Life of Nick Mason by Scott Hamilton

THE RETELLING OF A CLASSIC THAT I REALLY ENJOYED, WHICH SURPRISED ME AND ALSO THE AUTHOR WROTE ONE OF MY FAVORITE BOOKS OF ALL TIME, AMERICAN WIFE

Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld

THE BOOK THAT MADE ME CRY BECAUSE IT HELD SO MUCH I COULD RELATE TO AND THEN MADE ME A LITTLE MAD

13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl by Mona Awad

EXCELLENT SMALL PRESS BOOKS YOU SHOULD CHECK OUT

Pink Museum by Caroline Crew
The Farmacist by Ashley Farmer
The Voyager Record by Anthony Michael Morena
Massive Cleansing Fire by Dave Housley

THE BOOK I READ TO LEARN HOW TO WRITE A COMIC BOOK SERIES EVEN THOUGH I WAS WRITING FOR THEIR MAJOR COMPETITOR

The DC Comics Guide to Writing Comics by Dennis O’Neil

THE COMIC BOOK I LOVED AND RECOMMEND OFTEN

Saga by Brian Vaughan

THE COMIC BOOK ISSUE I READ AND THOUGHT WAS NOT SO GOOD SO I HAVEN’T READ ANY OTHER ISSUES IN THE SERIES

Wonder Woman Rebirth #1

THE BOOK I WROTE AN INTRODUCTION FOR (OUT IN 2017! FROM BEACON PRESS!)

Like One of the Family by Alice Childress

THE BOOK I REVIEWED FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult

THE BOOK I WANTED TO LOVE THAT HAD GORGEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF WOMEN’S FRIENDSHIPS

Rich and Pretty by Rumaan Alam

THE BOOK ABOUT CHEFS AND THEIR TATTOOS WITH FASCINATING STORIES OF WHY PEOPLE PERMANENTLY INK THEIR SKIN

Knives and Ink by Isaac Fitzgerald and Wendy MacNaughton

THE BOOK I READ BECAUSE I SAW A PREVIEW FOR THE TV SHOW AND LEARNED IT WAS BASED ON A BOOK SO I STARTED WONDERING IF THE BOOK WAS GOOD

Queen of the South by Arturo Perez-Reverte

SOME VERY GOOD BOOKS YOU SHOULD CHECK OUT BECAUSE THE STORIES ARE WARM AND/OR INTELLIGENT AND/OR STRANGE AND/OR GRIPPING AND/OR INTENSE

Turner House by Angela Flournoy
LaRose by Louise Erdrich
The Wangs vs the World by Jade Chang
The Story of My Teeth by Valerie Luiselli
You Will Know Me by Megan Abbott

THE HEARTBREAKING BOOK ABOUT BEING GAY IN THE MIDDLE EAST DURING THESE TUMULTUOUS TIMES FROM A WRITER WITH A LOT OF POTENTIAL

Guapa by Saleem Haddad

GORGEOUS BOOKS OF POETRY I REALLY LOVED

Night Sky With Exit Wounds by Ocean Vuong
L’Heure Bleue by Elisa Gabbert
The New Testament by Jericho Brown
Look by Solmaz Sharif
There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé by Morgan Parker

THE EXCELLENT BOOK I CHOSE AS MY SELECTION FOR BOOK OF THE MONTH CLUB

The Veins of the Ocean by Patricia Engel

THE BOOK I READ BASICALLY TO IMPRESS A GIRL AND IT WAS A PRETTY GOOD BOOK ALSO AND I HOPE THE GIRL WAS IMPRESSED BY MY DEDICATION BECAUSE THE BOOK WAS VERY LONG

The Fireman by Joe Hill

THE BOOK WITH AN AMAZING TITLE,  SOME REALLY GOOD STORIES INCLUDING A RIFF ON ANTIQUES ROADSHOW AND ALSO SOME STORIES I LIKED LESS

American Housewife by Helen Ellis

THE BOOK THAT WAS EXCEPTIONALLY WRITTEN BUT I WANTED THE ACTUAL RAILROAD PART TO BE MORE FULLY REALIZED

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

FUN BOOKS THAT WERE FUN

The Assistants by Camille Perri
China Rich Girlfriend by Kevin Kwan

THE BOOK ABOUT BEING SINGLE TOWARD THE MIDDLE OF YOUR LIFE THAT PRETTY MUCH EVERYONE IS GOING TO LOVE WHEN IT COMES OUT

All Grown Up by Jami Attenberg

THE EXCELLENT SHORT STORY COLLECTIONS COMING OUT AROUND THE SAME TIME AS DIFFICULT WOMEN THAT MADE ME JEALOUS AND ALSO SCARED OF THE COMPETITION

Homesick for Another World by Ottessa Moshfegh
Always Happy Hour by Mary Miller

THE BOOK THAT WAS NOT MY CUP OF TEA BUT IT’S ME NOT THE BOOK

300 Arguments by Sarah Manguso

THE BOOKS I BLURBED (AND THEREFORE REALLY ENJOYED)

You’re the  Most Beautiful Thing That Happened by Arisa White
In the Not Quite Dark by Dana Johnson
I Almost Forgot About You by Terry McMillan
The Red Car by Marcy Dermansky
Feminist Baby by Loryn Brantz
Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy by Tressie McMillan Cottom
Bruja by Wendy C. Ortiz
Sing For Your Life by Daniel Bergner
Made for Love by Alissa Nutting

The Origins of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein”

In 1815, the eruption of Mount Tambora plunged parts of the world into darkness and marked a gloomy period that came to be known as The Year Without a Summer. So when Mary and Percy Shelley arrived at the House of Lord Byron on Lake Geneva, their vacation was mostly spent indoors. For amusement, Byron proposed a challenge to his literary companions: Who could write the most chilling ghost story? This sparked an idea in 18-year-old Mary. Over the next few months, she would craft the story of Frankenstein.

Popular depictions may evoke a green and groaning figure, but that’s not Mary Shelley’s monster. In fact, in the book, Frankenstein refers to the nameless monster’s maker, Dr. Victor Frankenstein. So tense is the struggle between creator and creature that the two have merged in our collective imagination.

The book traces Dr. Frankenstein’s futile quest to impart and sustain life. He constructs his monster part by part from dead matter and electrifies it into conscious being. Upon completing the experiment, however, he’s horrified at the result and flees. But time and space aren’t enough to banish the abandoned monster, and the plot turns on a chilling chase between the two.

Shelley subtitled her fireside ghost story, “The Modern Prometheus.” That’s in reference to the Greek myth of the Titan Prometheus who stole fire from the gods and gave it to humanity. This gave humanity knowledge and power, but for tampering with the status quo, Prometheus was chained to a rock and eaten by vultures for eternity. Prometheus enjoyed a resurgence in the literature of the Romantic Period during the 18th century. Mary was a prominent Romantic, and shared the movement’s appreciation for nature, emotion, and the purity of art. The Romantics used these mythical references to signal the purity of the Ancient World in contrast to modernity. They typically regarded science with suspicion, and “Frankenstein” is one of the first cautionary tales about artificial intelligence. For Shelley, the terror was not supernatural, but born in a lab.

In addition, gothic devices infuse the text. The gothic genre is characterized by unease, eerie settings, the grotesque, and the fear of oblivion - all elements that can be seen in “Frankenstein.” But this horror had roots in personal trauma, as well. The text is filled with references to Shelley’s own circumstances. Born in 1797, Mary was the child of William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft. Both were radical intellectual figures, and her mother’s book, “A Vindication of the Rights of Women,” is a key feminist text. Tragically, she died as a result of complications from Mary’s birth. Mary was haunted by her mother’s death, and later experienced her own problems with childbirth. She became pregnant following her elopement with Percy at 16, but that baby died shortly after birth. Out of four more pregnancies, only one of their children survived. Some critics have linked this tragedy to the themes explored in “Frankenstein.” Shelley depicts birth as both creative and destructive, and the monster becomes a disfigured mirror of the natural cycle of life. 

The monster, therefore, embodies Dr. Frankenstein’s corruption of nature in the quest for glory. This constitutes his fatal flaw, or hamartia. His god complex is most clear in the line, “Life and death appear to me ideal bounds which I should first break through and pour a torrent of light onto our dark world.” Although he accomplishes something awe-inspiring, he has played with fire at his own ethical expense. And that decision echoes throughout the novel, which is full of references to fire and imagery that contrasts light and dark. These moments suggest not only the spark of Prometheus’s fire, but the power of radical ideas to expose darker areas of life.

From the TED-Ed Lesson Everything you need to know to read “Frankenstein” - Iseult Gillespie

Animation by Silvia Prietov

  • how NOT to make the uk more democratic: this whole brexit referendum thing
  • how TO make the uk more democratic: we replace the House of Lords with the house of swords. every law, once it has passed through the House of Commons, will be decided by a bunch of fuckin 80yr old aristocrats coming at each other with fuckin swords. for big laws, the queen is there, she has a pocket knife and a fiery determination to succeed,

SLYTHERIN: “In place of the Dark Lord you will set up a Queen. And I shall not be dark, but beautiful and terrible as the Morning and the Night! Fair as the Sea and the Sun and the Snow upon the Mountain! Dreadful as the Storm and the Lightning! Stronger than the foundations of the earth. All shall love me and despair!” -JRR Tolkien (Galadriel: Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring)

CHILDHOOD IN ASTROLOGY

Okay so I understand that a lot of people use astrology to map their lives, which I personally love to do. Childhood environments and events are usually something that people look into a lot (so do I) and I think this can be a good thing because it helps you figure out where personal issues come from, which helps you control them. In the following post I’m going to outline some of the things that are useful to look at in the chart when mapping out childhood. 

Moon, Sun and Saturn Placements/Aspects: As you can imagine, looking at our parents influence in our lives can be a good place to start. The Moon of course represents the Mother, the Sun represents the Father and Saturn represents the authoritarian figure in the family which is usually stereotypes as the father but of course in modern society, things are different so Saturn represents the dominant parent/guardian.

The 4th House Cusp: The sign that is on our 4th House cusp or the IC, shows us a lot about our family situation/dynamic. It represents our childhood within the home and our relationships with our family as well as expectations we had to meet.

Planets/Aspects to the 4th House: Like the 4th House cusp, the planets that reside there (if any) can shows us some striking themes played out through the home while aspects will show you influences from other areas of the chart (your life)

The 3rd House Cusp: The sign on the 3rd House cusp is responsible for early childhood outside of the inner home, it shows you school, your relationship with your siblings and is also responsible for the amount of times you moved house (if any).

Planets/Aspects to the 3rd House: Again like the 4th House, planets here will show you the energy that prevailed in this time of your life and aspects will show you influences from other areas of the chart (your life)

3rd and 4th House Lords: For this you need to look at the sign on the cusps of these houses and then look for where their ruling sign is in your chart. This will show you what other areas of your life these houses have served. You can also do this the opposite way around if you have planets in these houses to see what other areas of your life these houses have served.

IC Persona Chart: For those of you who are quite confident with interpreting charts, the IC persona chart can give you a way more in depth look into your home life. It’s laid out like a normal chart but all the placements are interpreted as your home life/childhood’s personality.

*Bare in mind that your whole chart is a reflection of the person you grew up to be, these are just the main points to look at*