house on the prairie

Happy 150th, Laura Ingalls Wilder! (2/07/1867 - 2/10/1957)

Great River Road - Little House In The Big Woods (A log cabin replica of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s birthsite.)
Series: Digital Photographs Relating to America’s Byways, ca. 1995 - ca. 2013Record Group 406: Records of the Federal Highway Administration, 1956 - 2008

The author of the Little House series was born 150 years ago on February 7, 1867 in the Big Woods region of Wisconsin.

The National Archives holds a number of Little House-related items, including the Homestead Proof of Almanzo Wilder, as well as the papers of Laura Ingalls Wilder and her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, at the Hoover Presidential Library.

Laura Ingalls Wilder, Herbert Hoover Presidential Library, The National Archives

You can also see how records in the National Archives back up what Laura wrote about one of her home towns in De Smet, Dakota Territory, Little Town in the National Archives (Winter 2003 Prologue).

Find more Laura Ingalls Wilder-related items in the @usnatarchives online Catalog.

These are the 100 best young adult books, according to Time. How many of these have you read?

  1. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
  2. Harry Potter (series) by J.K. Rowling
  3. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
  4. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
  5. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
  6. Holes by Louis Sachar
  7. Matilda by Roald Dahl
  8. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
  9. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norman Juster
  10. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  11. Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
  12. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  13. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor
  14. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  15. The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
  16. Monster by Walter Dean Myers
  17. The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman
  18. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank 
  19. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
  20. Looking for Alaska by John Green
  21. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time  by Mark Haddon
  22. Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  23. The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamilo
  24. Wonder by R.J. Palacio
  25. The Sword in the Stone by T.H. White
  26. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  27. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  28. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  29. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  30. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum
  31. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  32. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
  33. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll
  34. Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
  35. The Call of the Wild by Jack London
  36. A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  37. Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh
  38. The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
  39. Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Paterson
  40. A Series of Unfortunate Events (series) by Lemony Snicket  
  41. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
  42. The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
  43. Feed by M.T. Anderson
  44. The Alchemyst by Michael Scott
  45. The Princess Bride by William Goldman 
  46. Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary
  47. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  48. Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes
  49. The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin
  50. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
  51. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
  52. Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers
  53. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  54. A Northern Light by Jennifer Donnelly
  55. The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
  56. The Hunger Games (series) by Suzanne Collins
  57. For Freedom by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
  58. The Wall: Growing up Behind the Iron Curtain by Peter Sis
  59. A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness
  60. Percy Jackson and the Olympians (series) by Rick Riordan
  61. The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury
  62. A Wreath for Emmett Till by Marilyn Nelson
  63. Every Day by David Levithan
  64. Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley
  65. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  66. Blankets by Craig Thompson 
  67. Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo
  68. The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare
  69. Dangerous Angels by Francesca Lia Block
  70. Frindle by Andrew Clements
  71. Boxers and Saints by Gene Luen Yang
  72. The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
  73. City of the Beasts by Isabel Allende
  74. American Born Chinese by  Gene Luen Yang
  75. The Lost Conspiracy by Frances Hardinge
  76. Dogsbody by Diana Wynne Jones
  77. The Pigman by Paul Zindel
  78. Alabama Moon by Watt Key
  79. Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan
  80. The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
  81. Boy Proof by Cecil Castellucci
  82. Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers
  83. A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes
  84. The Tiger Rising by Kate Dicamillo
  85. When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead
  86. Saffy’s Angel by Hilary McKay
  87. The Grey King by Susan Cooper
  88. Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O'Brien
  89. The Thief Lord by Cornelia Funke
  90. The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Steward
  91. The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
  92. Sabriel by Garth Nix
  93. Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson
  94. Secret (series) by Pseudonymous Bosch
  95. The Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin
  96. Tales of Mystery and Imagination by Edgar Allan Poe
  97. Whale Talk by Chris Crutcher
  98. The Chronicles of Prydian (series) by Lloyd Alexander
  99. Danny, the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl
  100. Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

P.S. Want to make a little more progress on this list? You can get two free audiobooks here

I love children’s books, but I get that not everyone does. That said, I came across two August books in the mail pile that take a critical (and, yes, more grown-up) approach to kids lit. Was The Cat In The Hat Black? by Philip Nel explores at the hidden racism behind popular children’s books, and Wild Things by Bruce Handy provides context and analysis for childhood classics like Little House on the Prairie, The Giving Tree and Goodnight Moon.

If you ARE into picture books, Chelsea Marshall and Mary Dauterman just published a satirical one for adults called  What Are We Even Doing With Our Lives?

Had to include this interior image – because public radio and tote bags:

- Sydnee

Images: Oxford University Press,  Simon & Schuster, Dey Street Books.

8

“Recess was supposed to be the most fun, only Nellie Oleson wouldn’t ever let us play anything but ‘Ring Around a Rosie’. I didn’t want to, but Ma said  'do unto others’. I couldn’t help wondering when Nellie’s Ma would get around to telling her the same thing.”

anonymous asked:

Full, honest, and brutal opinion on FLW. Please?

HAHAHA! Sounds like you are not a fan.

In my opinion, Frank Lloyd Wright is a unique character in the history of architecture because he stands alone, he does not seem to belong to any major movement or ideal. He was a visionary seeking in his design that magical nexus where architecture and nature coexist in balance. I don’t count myself as one of those that consider him the greatest ever or a genius without equal but I do admire his tenacity and incredible ability to continually challenge himself and experiment with new and different design solutions. He could have coasted and done Prairie Style Houses all his life or copied Fallingwater twenty times, but he didn’t. All his projects were not successful, and some of the designs we love had major design flaws, but I admire the fact that he pushed the boundaries as he did. That is why I consider him one of the masters, he was a transitional architect with a wealth of projects, each unique and different. He created some projects that have become icons, rightly so, that continue to inspire architects a century after.

Keep reading