house on the prairie

Star Trek has a well-earned reputation as a progressive show. It took place in a utopian future in which all races came together on equal footing, and even featured TV’s first interracial kiss. That’s almost enough positive karma to make up for what The Next Generation did with “Code Of Honor.”

“Code Of Honor” was the fourth episode in the first season of TNG, and began with the crew of the Enterprise visiting the planet Ligon II, where they needed to pick up a vaccine from the native Ligonians. So far so good, but the Ligonians were not an exotic alien race, but a backwards, cartoonish depiction of African culture so offensive that Jonathan Frakes (Commander William Riker) referred to the episode as “a racist piece of shit.”

The Ligonians are entirely black, unlike most other multicultural civilizations seen in Star Trek. They dress in a mishmash of African attire like turbans, flowing vests, and, uh, MC Hammer pants. They also attack the Enterprise crew with poison-tipped weapons and live in a society dominated by ritual fights to the death and forced marriages. Captain Jean-Luc Picard describes them as “a few centuries behind” and something that modern man has “evolved” beyond. The first draft of the script almost certainly had a scene where the away team had to escape from a giant pot of water and vegetables.

6 Great TV Shows That Went Completely Insane For One Episode

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Favorite Pics of 2016

I was tagged by the lovely @pixelb0mb to post my favorite pics that I’ve taken throughout the year. 

pixelb0mb, thank you so much for tagging me! Going through my pics got me all geared up for a round of decorating tonight. :)

I’m tagging @simlishanddreams, @tinwhistletoo, @bsimth, @bustedpixels, @jools-simming, @simmingstuff, and @vicarious-sims.

How many of these have you read?

  1. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
  2. Harry Potter (series) by J.K. Rowling
  3. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
  4. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
  5. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
  6. Holes by Louis Sachar
  7. Matilda by Roald Dahl
  8. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
  9. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norman Juster
  10. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  11. Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
  12. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  13. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor
  14. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  15. The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
  16. Monster by Walter Dean Myers
  17. The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman
  18. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank 
  19. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
  20. Looking for Alaska by John Green
  21. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time  by Mark Haddon
  22. Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  23. The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamilo
  24. Wonder by R.J. Palacio
  25. The Sword in the Stone by T.H. White
  26. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  27. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  28. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  29. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  30. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum
  31. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  32. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
  33. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll
  34. Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
  35. The Call of the Wild by Jack London
  36. A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  37. Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh
  38. The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
  39. Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Paterson
  40. A Series of Unfortunate Events (series) by Lemony Snicket  
  41. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
  42. The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
  43. Feed by M.T. Anderson
  44. The Alchemyst by Michael Scott
  45. The Princess Bride by William Goldman 
  46. Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary
  47. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  48. Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes
  49. The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin
  50. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
  51. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
  52. Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers
  53. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  54. A Northern Light by Jennifer Donnelly
  55. The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
  56. The Hunger Games (series) by Suzanne Collins
  57. For Freedom by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
  58. The Wall: Growing up Behind the Iron Curtain by Peter Sis
  59. A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness
  60. Percy Jackson and the Olympians (series) by Rick Riordan
  61. The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury
  62. A Wreath for Emmett Till by Marilyn Nelson
  63. Every Day by David Levithan
  64. Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley
  65. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  66. Blankets by Craig Thompson 
  67. Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo
  68. The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare
  69. Dangerous Angels by Francesca Lia Block
  70. Frindle by Andrew Clements
  71. Boxers and Saints by Gene Luen Yang
  72. The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
  73. City of the Beasts by Isabel Allende
  74. American Born Chinese by  Gene Luen Yang
  75. The Lost Conspiracy by Frances Hardinge
  76. Dogsbody by Diana Wynne Jones
  77. The Pigman by Paul Zindel
  78. Alabama Moon by Watt Key
  79. Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan
  80. The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
  81. Boy Proof by Cecil Castellucci
  82. Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers
  83. A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes
  84. The Tiger Rising by Kate Dicamillo
  85. When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead
  86. Saffy’s Angel by Hilary McKay
  87. The Grey King by Susan Cooper
  88. Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O'Brien
  89. The Thief Lord by Cornelia Funke
  90. The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Steward
  91. The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
  92. Sabriel by Garth Nix
  93. Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson
  94. Secret (series) by Pseudonymous Bosch
  95. The Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin
  96. Tales of Mystery and Imagination by Edgar Allan Poe
  97. Whale Talk by Chris Crutcher
  98. The Chronicles of Prydian (series) by Lloyd Alexander
  99. Danny, the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl
  100. Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

P.S. Want to make a little more progress on this list? You can get two free audiobooks here

flickr

muncie 1888 1a by JDHRosewater
Via Flickr:
Muncie IN 1895 + or -

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literary witch heroines: laura ingalls wilder

abilities: communication with the prairie and woods, cooking and baking magic, spells and potions

laura can bottle magic. more specifically- she cans magic, she makes into jam, into pie, into dinner for ma and pa. the prairie and woods call to her, whisper to her, and she puts it into her spells. she loves the world, and the world loves her.

Old(er) Writers: It’s Never Too Late

Writing doesn’t have an age range. There is no too young or too old to start writing or get published. People of all ages have made an impact on the writing world. Here I have compiled a short list of writers whose debut book was written or published after they turned 50.

Richard Adams published Watership Down when he was 52 years of age. It became an immediate success and Adams won the two most prestigious children’s book awards in Britain. He became a full time author two years later after the publishing of his second book.

Laura Ingalls Wilder was 66 when her first novel, Little House in the Big Woods, was published by Harper & Brothers in 1932. She followed up the initial book’s success with seven more in the series prior to her death. The series has since sold over 60 million copies worldwide and has been translated into 30+ languages.

Anna Sewell started writing Black Beauty, her first and only novel, in 1871 The book was published in 1877 when she was 57 years old. Black Beauty has sold over 50 million copies, making it one of the best selling books of all time.

Frank McCourt won the Pulitzer Prize for his first book, Angela’s Ashes, a memoir he published at 66. He followed up his success with two more memoirs, ‘Tis and Teacher Man. His books sold over 10 million copies.

Millard Kaufman started writing novels after a long career as a screenwriter. He began his first novel, Bowl of Cherries, when he was 86 and published it four years later at age 90. His second novel was published posthumously.

Bryce Courtenay was 56 when his first novel, The Power of One, was published. He has gone on to write over a dozen more novels and is one of Australia’s best selling authors. He still writes today at age 79.

Donald Ray Pollock worked at a paper mill until he was 50 when he enrolled in Ohio State University’s English program and published a short story collection four years later. The Devil All the Time, his first novel, was published in 2011 when he was 57.

Nirad C. Chaudhuri was a political commentator in India and published his first book in 1951, An Autobiography of an Unknown Indian. He was 54. He continued on to write an additional ten books, the last published three years before his death when he was 99.

Mary Wesley was 57 when her first two children’s novels were published in 1969, but she didn’t achieve fame until she began writing novels for adults in 1983. She wrote and published a total of seven novels during her 70s. Her books have sold over 3 million copies.

Young Writers: It’s Never Too Early

That Fandom™: *reappears*

me, sitting on the wooden porch of my prairie house, rocking my chair slowly back and forth and watching the clouds darken as the teacup full of gin in my hand trembles: ma always said history was doomed to repeat itself