houben

Elsa, Liège, Belgium, 2015

My work with Elsa last year was some of my favorite. I was very happy to shoot at her beautiful home this year. It does not surprise me at all she keeps landing not just modeling jobs but a number of acting roles. Elsa is incredibly bright and really needs almost no direction. She is something special and it always feels like an honor to work with her.

Homes: Former Potato Barns Converted By Houben & Van Mierlo Architecten
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Former Potato Barns Converted By Houben & Van Mierlo Architecten


Houben & Van Mierlo Architecten has transformed a pair of former barns in Amsterdam into residences that combine original features with nods to their industrial past.

The two neighbouring buildings are located in Amsterdam Noord – an upcoming neighbourhood to the north of the IJ river.

Eindhoven-based Houben & Van Mierlo Architecten was asked to create two modern homes – including one for photographers Maurice Scheltens and Liesbeth Abbenes, who requested a studio space in their property.

The buildings are both from different periods, and were constructed using different methods.

The first was erected around the time of the second world war using a hybrid construction, while the second dates from the 1960s and features a steel frame, wooden floors and a concrete facade.

Several extensions added during the intervening years were removed and the buildings were stripped back to their basic shells at the beginning of the renovation process.

The architects chose to maintain the resulting open-plan rooms. They adapted them to accommodate loft-like living and working spaces featuring high, exposed ceilings.

Materials introduced for structural, technical or aesthetic purposes are chosen to complement the industrial feel of the interiors.

Black steel columns and beams brace the walls and support upper storeys slotted in beneath the pitched roofs. Whitewashed brick walls and exposed venting add to the raw aesthetic.

The photographic studio created for Scheltens and Abbenes has double-height ceilings, plus clerestory windows providing natural light.

The dramatic space also features an exposed pitched roof and is overlooked by a window set in the wall of the master bedroom on the first floor.

Next to the studio, an office is housed in a single-storey flat-roofed volume between the two buildings. The other half of this structure contains a dining area connected to the open-plan kitchen and living room.

A corner between the lounge and dining space contains large glass surfaces, with integrated doors leading out onto a terrace and the garden beyond.

A guest room situated off the main living space features a tiled wash area and glazed doors that open onto a small patio.

Much of the furniture, lighting, hardware, paint finishes and wall tiles in the photographers’ home was provided by companies the duo has collaborated with, including Farrow & Ball, Scholten & Baijings and Muller Van Severen.

Source: Dezeen

Women of House Targaryen

Princess Jaehaera Targaryen was the daughter of Aegon II Targaryen and his sister-wife and Queen Helaena Targaryen, and the first wife and queen of her cousin Aegon III Targaryen. Jaehaera had a twin brother, Jaehaerys Targaryen, and a younger brother, Maelor Targaryen. The dragon Morghul was bound to her. She was born tiny and slow to grow. She is described as a sweet and simple girl at the time of the Dance of the Dragons.

Jaehaera was present in the Tower of the Hand when Blood slew her twin. Prince Jaehaerys. Prior to the boy’s death, as the queen prevaricated, Cheese warned her to make a choice soon, before Blood grew bored and raped Jaehaera. Following the deaths of her parents, brothers, and uncles in the Dance and the victory of the blacks, Jaehaera was married to her cousin King Aegon III Targaryen as part of the peace agreement. Since she was eight years old at the time of the marriage and Aegon was eleven, it was not consummated. Two years after her marriage, Jaehaera died when she reportedly threw herself from Maegor’s Holdfast and was impaled on the spikes of the dry moat below. She lived for a half hour in agony before her death. With her ended the line of the marriage of King Viserys I Targaryen and his second wife, Alicent Hightower.